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1. Excess mortality and life expectancy of individuals with type 1 diabetes: a rapid review

Excess mortality and life expectancy of individuals with type 1 diabetes: a rapid review 2019 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 314 EXCESS MORTALITY AND LIFE EXPECTANCY OF INDIVIDUALS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: A RAPID REVIEW 2019 www.kce.fgov.be KCE REPORT 314 HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH EXCESS MORTALITY AND LIFE EXPECTANCY OF INDIVIDUALS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: A RAPID REVIEW PETER LOUWAGIE, CHRIS DE LAET, DOMINIQUE ROBERFROID COLOPHON Title: Excess mortality and life expectancy of individuals with type 1 (...) : Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Life expectancy; Mortality; Survival NLM Classification: WK810 Language: English Format: Adobe® PDF™ (A4) Legal depot: D/2019/10.273/37 ISSN: 2466-6459 Copyright: KCE reports are published under a “by/nc/nd” Creative Commons Licence http://kce.fgov.be/content/about-copyrights-for-kce-publications. How to refer to this document? Louwagie P, De Laet C, Roberfroid D. Excess mortality and life expectancy of individuals with type 1 diabetes: a rapid review. Health Services

2019 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

2. Investigating the Effect of Self-Care Training on Life Expectancy and Quality of Life in Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer under Radiotherapy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Investigating the Effect of Self-Care Training on Life Expectancy and Quality of Life in Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer under Radiotherapy. A huge amount of the efforts made by health teams is dedicated to caring for cancer patients. This study has aimed to investigate the effect of self-care training on life expectancy and quality of life (QOL) in patients with gastrointestinal cancer who were under radiotherapy.In this clinical trial, 50 patients were selected using the block (...) randomization method. The intervention was performed at Ayatollah Khansari Hospital in Arak, Iran. The patients in the intervention group received three sessions of face-to-face training. The data collection tools included Schneider's Life Expectancy Questionnaire and EORTC QOLQ-C30. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 23.In the control group, 16 were male (64%) and 9 female (36%), and in the intervention group, 14 were male (56%) and 11 were female (44%). Before the intervention, the two groups were

2019 Asia-Pacific journal of oncology nursing Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Stalling life expectancy in the UK

Stalling life expectancy in the UK Stalling life expectancy in the UK | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply Stalling life expectancy in the UK This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Authors The stalling of improvements in life expectancy in the UK since 2011, highlighted again in the most , has prompted much comment and speculation (...) about the causes. Longevity is the ultimate measure of health, and the flatlining of life expectancy after decades of steady improvement has unsurprisingly led to calls for action. The Department of Health and Social Care has belatedly commissioned a review by Public Health England (PHE). The negative effect of post-2008 'austerity' on health, social care, and other public spending is cited as a potential cause in studies examining temporal associations between mortality trends and markers of NHS

2018 The King's Fund

4. What is happening to life expectancy in the UK?

What is happening to life expectancy in the UK? What is happening to life expectancy in the UK? | The King's Fund Main navigation Health and care services Leadership, systems and organisations Patients, people and society Policy, finance and performance Search term Apply What is happening to life expectancy in the UK? This content relates to the following topics: Share this content Authors 2010 marked a turning point in long-term mortality trends in the UK, with improvements tailing off after (...) decades of steady decline. In this piece Veena Raleigh looks at how overall life expectancy has changed over time, along with considerations such as the difference in life expectancy between males and females, geographical inequalities, how the UK compares with other countries, and possible factors in the more recent slowdown in mortality improvements in the UK. How has life expectancy changed over time? Mortality rates in England and Wales have , leading to a long-term rise in life expectancy

2018 The King's Fund

5. The Influence of Universal Health Coverage on Life Expectancy at Birth (LEAB) and Healthy Life Expectancy (HALE): A Multi-Country Cross-Sectional Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Influence of Universal Health Coverage on Life Expectancy at Birth (LEAB) and Healthy Life Expectancy (HALE): A Multi-Country Cross-Sectional Study Background: There are substantial differences in long term health outcomes across countries, particularly in terms of both life expectancy at birth (LEAB) and healthy life expectancy (HALE). Socio-economic status, disease prevention approaches, life style and health financing systems all influence long-term health goals such as life expectancy (...) . Within this context, universal health coverage (UHC) is expected to influence life expectancy as a comprehensive health policy. The aim of the study is to investigate this relationship between Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and life expectancy. Method: A multi-country cross-sectional study was performed drawing on different sources of data (World Health Organization, UNDP-Education and World Bank) from 193 UN member countries, applying administrative record linkage theory. Descriptive statistics, t

2018 Frontiers in pharmacology

6. Forecasting life expectancy, years of life lost, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 250 causes of death: reference and alternative scenarios for 2016-40 for 195 countries and territories. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Forecasting life expectancy, years of life lost, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 250 causes of death: reference and alternative scenarios for 2016-40 for 195 countries and territories. Understanding potential trajectories in health and drivers of health is crucial to guiding long-term investments and policy implementation. Past work on forecasting has provided an incomplete landscape of future health scenarios, highlighting a need for a more robust modelling platform from which (...) policy options and potential health trajectories can be assessed. This study provides a novel approach to modelling life expectancy, all-cause mortality and cause of death forecasts -and alternative future scenarios-for 250 causes of death from 2016 to 2040 in 195 countries and territories.We modelled 250 causes and cause groups organised by the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) hierarchical cause structure, using GBD 2016 estimates from 1990-2016, to generate

2018 Lancet

7. Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 359 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 359 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. How long one lives, how many years of life are spent in good and poor health, and how the population's state of health and leading causes of disability change over time all have implications for policy, planning, and provision of services. We (...) comparatively assessed the patterns and trends of healthy life expectancy (HALE), which quantifies the number of years of life expected to be lived in good health, and the complementary measure of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), a composite measure of disease burden capturing both premature mortality and prevalence and severity of ill health, for 359 diseases and injuries for 195 countries and territories over the past 28 years.We used data for age-specific mortality rates, years of life lost (YLLs

2018 Lancet

8. Minimal difference in survival between radical prostatectomy and observation in men with modest life expectancy

Minimal difference in survival between radical prostatectomy and observation in men with modest life expectancy Minimal difference in survival between radical prostatectomy and observation in men with modest life expectancy | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Minimal difference in survival between radical prostatectomy and observation in men with modest life expectancy Article Text Commentary: Surgery Minimal difference

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

9. Association of Household Income With Life Expectancy and Cause-Specific Mortality in Norway, 2005-2015. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of Household Income With Life Expectancy and Cause-Specific Mortality in Norway, 2005-2015. Examining causes of death and making comparisons across countries may increase understanding of the income-related differences in life expectancy.To describe income-related differences in life expectancy and causes of death in Norway and to compare those differences with US estimates.A registry-based study including all Norwegian residents aged at least 40 years from 2005 to 2015.Household (...) income adjusted for household size.Life expectancy at 40 years of age and cause-specific mortality.In total, 3 041 828 persons contributed 25 805 277 person-years and 441 768 deaths during the study period (mean [SD] age, 59.3 years [13.6]; mean [SD] number of household members per person, 2.5 [1.3]). Life expectancy was highest for women with income in the top 1% (86.4 years [95% CI, 85.7-87.1]) which was 8.4 years (95% CI, 7.2-9.6) longer than women with income in the lowest 1%. Men with the lowest

2019 JAMA

10. Contribution of specific diseases and injuries to changes in health adjusted life expectancy in 187 countries from 1990 to 2013: retrospective observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Contribution of specific diseases and injuries to changes in health adjusted life expectancy in 187 countries from 1990 to 2013: retrospective observational study. To quantify and compare the contribution of 306 diseases and injuries to the changes in health adjusted life expectancy at birth (HALE0) between 1990 and 2013.Retrospective demographic analysis based on aggregated data and using life table technique, Sullivan method, and decomposition method for differences in health expectancy.The (...) years in life expectancy lived with disability at birth. Only 44 (27%) of 163 causes at level 3 in the GBD cause hierarchy influenced changes in HALE0, mainly or only through disability.Between 1990 and 2013, the globe made achievements in not only promoting population health as a whole but reducing health inequality between countries. This study pinpoints the priority diseases and injuries for altering the declining health trend in 11 countries, for curbing the epidemic of non-communicable diseases

2019 BMJ

11. Decomposition of age- and cause-specific adult mortality contributions to the gender gap in life expectancy from census and survey data in Zambia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Decomposition of age- and cause-specific adult mortality contributions to the gender gap in life expectancy from census and survey data in Zambia In the context of high adult mortality and an immense impact on the health burden of Zambia, a decomposition analysis of age- and cause-specific mortality in age group 15-59 was performed to determine the contributions to the gap in life expectancy at birth between males and females. Previous studies on decomposition have examined income groups (...) , ethnicity, and regional differences' contributions to gaps in life expectancy, but not the adult mortality age group 15-59. These studies focus on developed countries and few on developing countries. Arriaga's decomposition method was applied to 2010 census and 2010-2012 sample vital registration with verbal autopsy survey (SAVVY) data to decompose contributions of age- and cause-specific adult mortality to the gap in life expectancy at birth between males and females. The decomposition analysis

2018 SSM - population health

12. How Do Older Adults Consider Age, Life Expectancy, Quality of Life, and Physician Recommendation When Making Cancer Screening Decisions? Results from a National Survey Using a Discrete Choice Experiment. (Abstract)

How Do Older Adults Consider Age, Life Expectancy, Quality of Life, and Physician Recommendation When Making Cancer Screening Decisions? Results from a National Survey Using a Discrete Choice Experiment. Background. Older adults with limited life expectancy frequently receive cancer screening, although on average, harms outweigh benefits. We examined the influence of life expectancy on older adults' cancer screening decisions relative to three other factors. Methods. Adults aged 65+ years (N (...) = 1272) were recruited from a national online survey panel. Using a discrete choice experiment, we systematically varied a hypothetical patient's life expectancy, age, quality of life, and physician's recommendation and asked whether the participant would choose screening. Participants were randomized to questions about colonoscopy or prostate-specific antigen/mammography screenings. Logistic regression produced preference weights that quantified the relative influence of the 4 factors on screening

2019 Medical Decision Making

13. Stillbirths: how should its rate be reported, its disability-adjusted-life-years (DALY), and stillbirths adjusted life expectancy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Stillbirths: how should its rate be reported, its disability-adjusted-life-years (DALY), and stillbirths adjusted life expectancy. A 2016 study standardized the definition of stillbirths. It estimated the rate as a proportion of total births. A 2015 paper addressed the problem of disability-adjusted life-years (DALY) for stillbirths. There has been no adjustment of life expectancy at birth to account for stillbirths.We follow mathematical and computational methods, use algebra to derive (...) relationships, and large databases. We express the rate as a proportion of live births and use this rate to adjust life expectancy at birth for stillbirths. We then use the difference between the traditional life expectancy and stillbirths adjusted life expectancy (SALE) to obtain DALY for stillbirths for 194 countries, the Millennium Development Goal regions, and income groups. We show defining stillbirths' rate as a proportion of live births enhances stillbirths' importance, especially in poorer countries

2019 Medical Informatics and Decision Making

14. Upsurge of Homicides and Its Impact on Life Expectancy and Life Span Inequality in Mexico, 2005-2015. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Upsurge of Homicides and Its Impact on Life Expectancy and Life Span Inequality in Mexico, 2005-2015. To quantify the effect of the upsurge of violence on life expectancy and life span inequality in Mexico after 2005.We calculated age- and cause-specific contributions to changes in life expectancy and life span inequality conditional on surviving to age 15 years between 1995 and 2015. We analyzed homicides, medically amenable conditions, diabetes, ischemic heart diseases, and traffic accidents (...) by state and sex.Male life expectancy at age 15 years increased by more than twice in 1995 to 2005 (1.17 years) than in 2005 to 2015 (0.55 years). Life span inequality decreased by more than half a year for males in 1995 to 2005, whereas in 2005 to 2015 the reduction was about 4 times smaller. Homicides for those aged between 15 and 49 years had the largest effect in slowing down male life expectancy and life span inequality. Between 2005 and 2015, three states in the north experienced life expectancy

2019 American Journal of Public Health

15. Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 333 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 333 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Measurement of changes in health across locations is useful to compare and contrast changing epidemiological patterns against health system performance and identify specific needs for resource allocation in research, policy development, and programme (...) decision making. Using the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016, we drew from two widely used summary measures to monitor such changes in population health: disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE). We used these measures to track trends and benchmark progress compared with expected trends on the basis of the Socio-demographic Index (SDI).We used results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 for all-cause

2017 Lancet

16. Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis–Attributable Years of Potential Life Lost to Life Expectancy and Potential Life Lost Before Age 65 Years — United States, 1999–2016 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis–Attributable Years of Potential Life Lost to Life Expectancy and Potential Life Lost Before Age 65 Years — United States, 1999–2016 Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a preventable occupational lung disease caused by inhaling coal mine dust that can lead to premature* death (1,2). To assess trends in premature mortality attributed to CWP (3), CDC analyzed underlying† causes of death data from 1999 to 2016, the most recent years for which complete data (...) are available. Years of potential life lost to life expectancy (YPLL) and years of potential life lost before age 65 years (YPLL65)§ were calculated (4). During 1999-2016, a total of 38,358 YPLL (mean per decedent = 8.8 years) and 2,707 YPLL65 (mean per decedent = 7.3 years) were attributed to CWP. The CWP-attributable YPLL decreased from 3,300 in 1999 to 1,813 in 2007 (p<0.05). No significant change in YPLL occurred after 2007. During 1996-2016, however, the mean YPLL per decedent significantly increased

2018 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

17. Evaluating compression or expansion of morbidity in Canada: trends in life expectancy and health-adjusted life expectancy from 1994 to 2010 Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluating compression or expansion of morbidity in Canada: trends in life expectancy and health-adjusted life expectancy from 1994 to 2010 The objective of this study was to investigate whether morbidity in Canada, at the national and provincial levels, is compressing or expanding by tracking trends in life expectancy (LE) and health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE) from 1994 to 2010. "Compression" refers to a decrease in the proportion of life spent in an unhealthy state over time. It happens (...) (NL) and Prince Edward Island (PEI).Our study did not detect a clear overall trend in compression or expansion of morbidity from 1994 to 2010 at the national level in Canada. However, our results suggested an expansion of morbidity in NL and PEI. Our study indicates the importance of continued tracking of the secular trends of life expectancy and HALE in Canada in order to verify the presence of compression or expansion of morbidity. Further study should be undertaken to understand what is driving

2017 Health promotion and chronic disease prevention in Canada : research, policy and practice

18. Factors Associated With Subjective Life Expectancy: Comparison With Actuarial Life Expectancy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Factors Associated With Subjective Life Expectancy: Comparison With Actuarial Life Expectancy Subjective life expectancy (SLE) has been found to show a significant association with mortality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the major factors affecting SLE. We also examined whether any differences existed between SLE and actuarial life expectancy (LE) in Korea.A cross-sectional survey of 1000 individuals in Korea aged 20-59 was conducted. Participants were asked about SLE via a self (...) sample) had an expected LE 1.59 years longer than that of men. The socioeconomic factors of household income and housing arrangements were related to SLE. Among the health behaviors, smoking status, alcohol status, and physical activity were associated with SLE. Among the psychosocial factors, stress, self-rated health, and social connectedness were related to SLE. SLE had a positive correlation with actuarial estimates (r=0.61, p<0.001). Gender, household income, history of smoking, and distress

2017 Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

19. The setting of the rising sun? A recent comparative history of life expectancy trends in Japan and Australia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The setting of the rising sun? A recent comparative history of life expectancy trends in Japan and Australia. Adult male and female mortality declines in Japan have been slower than in most high-income countries since the early 1990s. This study compares Japan's recent life expectancy trends with the more favourable trends in Australia, measures the contribution of age groups and causes of death to differences in these trends, and places the findings in the context of the countries' risk factor (...) transitions.The study utilises data on deaths by age, sex and cause in Australia and Japan from 1950-2016 from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A decomposition method measures the contributions of various ages and causes to the male and female life expectancy gap and changes over four distinct phases during this period. Mortality differences by cohort are also assessed.Japan's two-year male life expectancy advantage over Australia in the 1980s closed in the following 20 years. The trend was driven by ages

2019 PLoS ONE

20. Results from an online survey of adults with cystic fibrosis: Accessing and using life expectancy information. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Results from an online survey of adults with cystic fibrosis: Accessing and using life expectancy information. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the one of the most common inherited diseases. It affects around 10,000 people in the UK, and the median survival age is 47. Recent developments making use of longitudinal patient registry data are producing more detailed and relevant information about predicted life expectancy in CF based on current age and clinical measurements. The objective of this study (...) was toconduct an online survey of adults with CF living in the UK using a web-based questionnaire to investigate: (i) if and how they access information on life expectancy; (ii) what they use it for; (iii) if they want more personalised information on life expectancy or the time until other milestones. The survey was advertised through the Cystic Fibrosis Trust using social media. There were 85 respondents, covering men (39%) and women (61%) aged 16-65. 75% had received information on life expectancy either

2019 PLoS ONE

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