How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,575 results for

Lice

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1561. Controlled study of malathion and d-phenothrin lotions for Pediculus humanus var capitis-infested schoolchildren. (Abstract)

then did a randomised controlled trial in which the lotions were administered to 193 P humanus capitis-infested schoolchildren (malathion, 95; d-phenothrin, 98). Success rate was defined as the absence of both live lice and viable nits. Before treatment, live lice were collected and subjected to a pediculicidal test. Pharmacological tests showed 100% killing of the rabbit-grown nits and lice after exposure to both pediculicides. On day 1 of the controlled trial, the success rate was 92 (...) Controlled study of malathion and d-phenothrin lotions for Pediculus humanus var capitis-infested schoolchildren. Anecdotal reports have suggested that reduced efficacy of pediculicides against Pediculus humanus capitis could be related to resistance to treatments. Ovicidal and pediculicidal activities of 0.5% malathion and 0.3% d-phenothrin lotions were tested in an experimental model of P humanus capitis grown on rabbits to ensure that the two treatments were pharmacologically equipotent. We

1995 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1562. The efficacy of permethrin lotion in pediculosis capitis. (Abstract)

The efficacy of permethrin lotion in pediculosis capitis. A clinical trial of the pyrethroid permethrin in 1% lotion was performed on 20 children. Ten were treated for 10 minutes and 10 for 2 hours. All lice washed off the heads of children treated for 2 hours were dead immediately after treatment. Twenty-four percent of the lice removed from one child treated for 10 minutes were still alive 2 hours later. The ovicidal effect was similar in both groups, with egg mortality 88% and 90% following

1985 International journal of dermatology

1563. 1% permethrin cream rinse vs 1% lindane shampoo in treating pediculosis capitis. (Abstract)

1% permethrin cream rinse vs 1% lindane shampoo in treating pediculosis capitis. The therapeutic efficacy and tolerance of a single application of 1% permethrin cream rinse, applied for ten minutes, and a single application of 1% lindane shampoo applied, as recommended by the manufacturer, for four minutes, against the head louse Pediculus humanus var capitis were compared in a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Of 573 patients enrolled at eight centers, 559 were assessable (...) for tolerance and 508 for efficacy. Of the 257 patients treated with 1% permethrin cream rinse, 99% were lice free at 14 days; of the 251 patients treated with 1% lindane shampoo, 85% were lice free at 14 days. The difference is statistically significant. For both treatments, adverse experiences were infrequent, mild, and usually difficult to distinguish from the symptoms of head lice infestation. A single ten-minute application of 1% permethrin cream rinse was well tolerated, highly effective

1986 American journal of diseases of children (1960) Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1564. Insecticides in pediculosis capitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Insecticides in pediculosis capitis. 2923477 1989 04 14 2018 11 13 1468-2044 64 1 1989 Jan Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Insecticides in pediculosis capitis. 69-70 Maunder J W JW Medical Entomology Centre at the University of Cambridge, England. eng Journal Article England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 0 Insecticides AIM IM Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Child Drug Administration Schedule Humans Insecticides administration & dosage Lice Infestations drug therapy Scalp 1989 1

1989 Archives of Disease in Childhood

1565. Review of common therapeutic options in the United States for the treatment of pediculosis capitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review of common therapeutic options in the United States for the treatment of pediculosis capitis. Numerous therapies are available in both over-the-counter and prescription formulations for the treatment of head lice infestation. We summarize treatment recommendations from published literature and from a recent meta-analysis from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews that describe the efficacy, safety, and resistance patterns of monotherapies available in the United States. If treatment

2003 Clinical Infectious Diseases

1566. The prevalence of pediculosis capitis in schoolchildren in Mersin, Turkey. (Abstract)

The prevalence of pediculosis capitis in schoolchildren in Mersin, Turkey. Pediculosis capitis is an endemic parasitosis affecting many countries of the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of head lice infestation in Mersin, Turkey.A total of 5318 elementary schoolchildren, aged 8-16 years, were examined for the presence of Pediculus capitis. If any evidence of head lice was detected, such as live or dead eggs, or nits, the child was considered to be infected (...) , d.f. = 1, P = 0.000). Children aged 8-9 years exhibited a significantly lower prevalence rate than those aged 10-11 years and those aged 12 years and above. The following variables were found to be statistically significantly related to pediculosis capitis: sex, age, father's education level, and pet ownership (cat or dog).Our results show that the prevalence of pediculosis capitis is not very high in Mersin, Turkey, and is observed in all schools regardless of the socio-economic and personal

2003 International Journal of Dermatology

1567. Transmission potential of the human head louse, Pediculus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae). (Abstract)

Transmission potential of the human head louse, Pediculus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae). Millions of people are infested by head lice every year. However, louse transfer between hosts is not well-understood. Our goals were to determine: (1) which stages were most likely to disperse and why, (2) the likelihood of fomites transmission, and (3) if host blood gender affects louse development.Various life stages of lice at differing densities were permitted to cross over a 15-cm hair bridge placed (...) between two artificial blood-feeding arenas. Louse transfer caused by hot air movements, combing, toweling, and passive transfer to fabric was investigated. The ability of lice to oviposit on different foreign substrates and the hatching potential of eggs intermittently incubated for 8 h/night on a host were likewise investigated. Louse in vitro development following feeding on human female or male donor blood was compared.Adult lice were the most likely to disperse. Neither population density nor

2005 International Journal of Dermatology

1568. Clinical efficacy of treatment for head lice. Counting head lice by visual inspection flaws trials' results. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clinical efficacy of treatment for head lice. Counting head lice by visual inspection flaws trials' results. 7496302 1996 01 18 2018 11 13 0959-8138 311 7016 1995 Nov 18 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Clinical efficacy of treatment for head lice. Counting head lice by visual inspection flaws trials' results. 1369; author reply 1369-70 Stallbaumer M M Ibarra J J eng Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1995 Sep 2;311(7005):604-8 7545045 Clinical Trials as Topic Humans Lice

1995 BMJ : British Medical Journal

1569. Permethrin 1% creme rinse for the treatment of Pediculus humanus var capitis infestation. (Abstract)

Permethrin 1% creme rinse for the treatment of Pediculus humanus var capitis infestation. Permethrin 1% creme rinse (NIX) was tested as a treatment for Pediculus humanus var capitis (head lice) in a placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized study. As a positive control, a third arm of the study included nonrandomized, but investigator-blinded, treatment with 1% lindane shampoo (Kwell). At 14 days after treatment, 97% of patients treated with permethrin were free of lice compared to 6 (...) % of placebo-treated patients (P less than 0.001) and 43% of the lindane-treated group. Permethrin was 70% ovicidal compared to 14% for placebo (P less than 0.001) and 45% for lindane. No adverse experiences were noted during this study. Permethrin 1% demonstrated high pediculicidal and ovicidal activities, which in combination with its low mammalian toxicity, residual activity, and cosmetic properties, make it an excellent treatment for pediculosis capitis.

1986 Pediatric dermatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1570. Prevalence and treatment of Pediculus humanus capitis with 1% permethrin and 0.4% d-phenothrin in Turkey. (Abstract)

Prevalence and treatment of Pediculus humanus capitis with 1% permethrin and 0.4% d-phenothrin in Turkey. Pediculosis humanus capitis (head lice) is an important public health problem among school children. In our study, 20,612 schoolchildren (10,367 boys, 10,245 girls) were examined for Pediculus humanus capitis in 36 elementary schools between December 1996 and February 1998 in Ankara, Turkey. The prevalence of pediculosis capitis infestation was found to be 3.4% (701/20,612). Of these, 382 (...) students were treated with application of 1% permethrin cream rinse, and 184 students with 0.4% d-phenothrin shampoo. On day 14 of the controlled trial, the success rates were 93.7% in the 1% permethrin cream rinse group and 75.5% in the 0.4% d-phenothrin shampoo group. The 1% permethrin cream rinse was also significantly more active in pediculicidal efficacy when compared to the 0.4% d-phenothrin shampoo (p<0.001). As a result, these findings demonstrate that pediculosis capitis still remains

2003 Acta medica (Hradec Králové) / Universitas Carolina, Facultas Medica Hradec Králové Controlled trial quality: uncertain

1571. Head lice: scientific assessment of the nit sheath with clinical ramifications and therapeutic options. (Abstract)

Head lice: scientific assessment of the nit sheath with clinical ramifications and therapeutic options. Head lice, like many insects, produce a protective coating for their newly laid eggs that is essential to the survival of the species. Knowledge of the composition of the sheath, which is the glue by which the egg is attached to human hair, and the nit laying process could lead to production of agents that could be used to attack louse infestations by interfering with the normally protected (...) environment of nymph development within the egg. The physical removal of nits has become an important part of treatment of head louse infestations given the "no-nit" policy in schools. Biochemical analysis has revealed that the nit sheath of the head louse is composed of 4 bands of protein, possibly cross-linked to aliphatic components with a tertiary structure of beta sheeting. Nature has protected the louse by making the nit sheath similar in composition to the hair; thereby, agents designed to unravel

2005 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

1572. Head louse infestations: the "no nit" policy and its consequences. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Head louse infestations: the "no nit" policy and its consequences. Health authorities in the USA, Canada and Australia recommend a "no nit" policy, i.e. the immediate dismissal of all children who have head lice, eggs and/or nits on their hair from school, camp or child-care settings. These children would be readmitted to the institution only when all head lice, eggs and nits have been removed. The "no nit" policy assumes that all nits seen when examining the scalp are viable and therefore (...) the infested individual should be treated for lice, and all nits must be removed from the scalp. However, it has been repeatedly shown that only a small number of children who have nits on their scalp are also infested with living lice. Accordingly, in the USA alone 4-8 million children are treated unnecessarily for head lice annually, which amounts to 64% of all lice treatments. In addition, 12-24 million school days are lost annually. The annual economic loss owing to missed workdays by parents who have

2006 International Journal of Dermatology

1573. A comparison of botanical and synthetic substances commonly used to prevent head lice (Pediculus humanus var. capitis) infestation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A comparison of botanical and synthetic substances commonly used to prevent head lice (Pediculus humanus var. capitis) infestation. Pediculosis, caused by head lice (Pediculidae: Pediculus humanus var. capitis), is experiencing a global resurgence, with the prevalence in primary schools averaging as high as 40% in some areas regardless of socioeconomic factors. Control efforts using chemical treatments are becoming increasingly ineffective, with insecticide resistance recorded in several (...) countries. Prevention using repellents and oils would be useful if they limited transmission. Many commercially available substances reputedly have effective repellent qualities, but remain untested.This study tested the preventative efficacy of N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) against several commercially available botanicals to clarify their value as transmission inhibitors, irritants, repellents, and antifeedants.The transfer of head lice to treated hairs was limited by the slippery nature

2007 International Journal of Dermatology

1574. Quantification of blood intake of the head louse: Pediculus humanus capitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Quantification of blood intake of the head louse: Pediculus humanus capitis. Although head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, are globally prevalent blood-sucking ectoparasites, the amount of blood imbibed by head lice has not been determined. This study investigated this parameter, as regular loss of a small quantity of blood may lead to an iron deficiency and anaemia. Adult female lice (66), adult males (46), and nymphs (152) were weighed before and after feeding in groups of 17-109 lice (...) . The average amounts of blood imbibed at a single feed were: adult female louse (0.0001579 ml), adult male (0.0000657 ml) and nymph (0.0000387 ml). Assuming three feeds per day by an average infection of 30 lice (10 females, 10 males, and 10 nymphs), the average child with active pediculosis would loose 0.008 ml of blood per day. This amount of blood loss is of no clinical significance even in iron-deficient children. The most heavily infected child observed with 2657 lice could be expected to loose 0.7 ml

2006 International Journal of Dermatology

1575. Pediculosis capitis (head lice) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pediculosis capitis (head lice) 4042056 1985 11 19 2018 11 13 0820-3946 133 8 1985 Oct 15 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne CMAJ Pediculosis capitis (head lice). Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society. 741-2 eng Journal Article Canada CMAJ 9711805 0820-3946 AIM IM Child Female Humans Lice Infestations diagnosis therapy Male 1985 10 15 1985 10 15 0 1 1985 10 15 0 0 ppublish 4042056 PMC1346460 JAMA. 1976

1985 Canadian Medical Association Journal

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>