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321. WOOD TAR OILS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE (PEDICULUS HUMANUS) ON HAIR-CLAD AREAS Full Text available with Trip Pro

WOOD TAR OILS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE (PEDICULUS HUMANUS) ON HAIR-CLAD AREAS 20770485 2011 03 31 2011 03 31 0007-1447 2 3177 1921 Nov 19 British medical journal Br Med J WOOD TAR OILS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE (PEDICULUS HUMANUS) ON HAIR-CLAD AREAS. 853 Bacot A A eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1921 11 19 0 0 1921 11 19 0 1 ppublish 20770485 PMC2339347

1921 British medical journal

322. THE UNRELIABILITY OF SULPHUR FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE IN CLOTHING Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE UNRELIABILITY OF SULPHUR FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE IN CLOTHING 20769237 2011 03 31 2011 03 31 0007-1447 2 3017 1918 Oct 26 British medical journal Br Med J THE UNRELIABILITY OF SULPHUR FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE IN CLOTHING. 464 Bacot A A eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1918 10 26 0 0 1918 10 26 0 1 ppublish 20769237 PMC2341955

1918 British medical journal

323. INSECTS AND WAR: LICE Full Text available with Trip Pro

INSECTS AND WAR: LICE 20767301 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 2 2803 1914 Sep 19 British medical journal Br Med J INSECTS AND WAR: LICE. 497-9 Shipley A E AE eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1914 9 19 0 0 1914 9 19 0 1 ppublish 20767301 PMC2299779

1914 British medical journal

324. THE USE OF INSECTICIDES AGAINST LICE Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE USE OF INSECTICIDES AGAINST LICE 20768308 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 2 2909 1916 Sep 30 British medical journal Br Med J THE USE OF INSECTICIDES AGAINST LICE. 447-50 Bacot A A eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1916 9 30 0 0 1916 9 30 0 1 ppublish 20768308 PMC2354800

1916 British medical journal

325. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN Full Text available with Trip Pro

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN 20767691 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 1 2842 1915 Jun 19 British medical journal Br Med J AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN. 1038-41 Kinloch J P JP eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1915 6 19 0 0 1915 6 19 0 1 ppublish 20767691 PMC2302500

1915 British medical journal

326. THE TEMPERATURE NECESSARY FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE AND THEIR EGGS Full Text available with Trip Pro

THE TEMPERATURE NECESSARY FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE AND THEIR EGGS 20767995 2011 03 29 2011 03 29 0007-1447 1 2874 1916 Jan 29 British medical journal Br Med J THE TEMPERATURE NECESSARY FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF LICE AND THEIR EGGS. 167 Bacot A W AW eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1916 1 29 0 0 1916 1 29 0 1 ppublish 20767995 PMC2346943

1916 British medical journal

327. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN Full Text available with Trip Pro

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN 20768160 2011 03 29 2018 11 13 0007-1447 1 2892 1916 Jun 03 British medical journal Br Med J AN INVESTIGATION OF THE BEST METHODS OF DESTROYING LICE AND OTHER BODY VERMIN. 789-93 Kinloch J P JP eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 2010 8 27 6 0 1916 6 3 0 0 1916 6 3 0 1 ppublish 20768160 PMC2349069 Br Med J. 1915 Jun 19;1(2842):1038-41 20767691

1916 British medical journal

328. STUDIES ON TYPHUS FEVER : III. STUDIES OF LICE AND BEDBUGS (CIMEX LECTULARIUS) WITH MEXICAN TYPHUS FEVER VIRUS Full Text available with Trip Pro

STUDIES ON TYPHUS FEVER : III. STUDIES OF LICE AND BEDBUGS (CIMEX LECTULARIUS) WITH MEXICAN TYPHUS FEVER VIRUS Our experiments have shown that the Mooser bodies or Rickettsiae derived from guinea pigs with Mexican typhus fever can survive in bedbugs after intra-coelomic injection for 10 days, remaining capable of infection. We have also succeeded in similarly infecting bedbugs by allowing them to feed on benzolized rats in whose blood Rickettsiae had been shown to be present. Injection

1930 The Journal of experimental medicine

329. Gene Splicing in Lice and the Challenge of Clothing

& Scientific Policy Post navigation in A terrific article recently published in , “Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice,” provides a compelling example of maximizing genome information – adaptation of the louse Pediculus humanus to the new habitat created when our ancestors invented clothing. HEAD VS BODY LICE Many parents encounter when their children are sent home from school with instructions to get rid of the horrible rice-krispie-like eggs (“nits”) clinging to their scalp hairs. A good washing won’t (...) do it. Medication and clunky combs do very little alone. The sooner the poor parent realizes that meticulous nit-picking is the only solution, the sooner the nightmare ends. But consider the louse’s point of view. Nitpicking isn’t easy Lice live on us so that they can drink our blood, with a little help from bacteria that provide the B vitamins needed to extract maximal nutrients from their meals. Head lice lay their eggs on our hair shafts, gluing them in place. These are the much more common

2015 PLOS Blogs Network

330. Oral ivermectin versus malathion lotion for difficult-to-treat head lice. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Oral ivermectin versus malathion lotion for difficult-to-treat head lice. Head-lice infestation is prevalent worldwide, especially in children 3 to 11 years old. Topical insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids and malathion) used as a lotion, applied twice at an interval of 7 to 11 days, are typically used for treatment. Resistance of lice to insecticides, particularly pyrethroids, results in treatment failure. The efficacy of alternative agents is controversial.We conducted a multicenter, cluster (...) sites. The primary end point was the absence of head lice on day 15.A total of 812 patients from 376 households were randomly assigned to receive either ivermectin or malathion. In the intention-to-treat population, 95.2% of patients receiving ivermectin were lice-free on day 15, as compared with 85.0% of those receiving malathion (absolute difference, 10.2 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6 to 15.7; P<0.001). In the per-protocol population, 97.1% of patients in the ivermectin

2010 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

331. Lice

humanus corpus , Phthirus pubis Infestation , Head Lice , Phthirus pubis , Body Louse Infestation , Pediculus Capitis Infestation , Body Lice , Genital Lice From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Head and Body Lice are interchangeable Head Lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) Female lays eggs at base of hair Egg adheres as hair grows Transmitted by fomites or head to head contact Body Lice (Pediculus humanus corpus) Live in seams of clothing or bedding which they briefly leave only to feed on human host (...) capitis (diagnosis) , pediculosis capitis , Pediculus capitis infestation , Nits - head lice , Head pediculosis , Head-louse infestation , Infestation (by);lice;head , nits , pediculus capitis , head louse , head lice infestation , Head louse infestation (disorder) , Pediculus capitis (organism) , Pediculosis capitis , Head lice , Lice infested hair , Lousy hair , Nit infested hair , Nits , Head lice infestation , Head louse infestation , Pediculosis capitis (disorder) , Pediculus humanus capitis

2015 FP Notebook

332. Common sense guidelines for children with lice

lice cannot live off of a warm body for very long. Consider washing items that have recently (within 2 days) come in contact with a child’s head, like hat or hair accessories, but exhaustive and widespread cleaning and vacuuming efforts are not needed. Widespread use of chemical sprays in the house is dangerous and unnecessary. Most importantly, as the AAP says, it doesn’t make any sense to exclude children with lice or nits from school. That doesn’t decrease transmission, and it doesn’t prevent (...) , an itchy scalp. Here’s what parents should keep in mind when they suspect their child has lice: Lice are not difficult to diagnose. They run around the scalp. Look. If they’re there, you’ll see them. You can also “catch” them on a comb. Lice are not little fluffy bits of fuzz or little flakes of nothing. Lice eggs (nits) look like sesame seeds, and they’re literally glued to individual hairs, down near the scalp. The live ones, ones that will hatch, are within ½ inch of the scalp. Any nits further out

2015 KevinMD blog

333. Lice

are transmitted by close contact; body lice are transmitted in cramped, crowded conditions; and pubic lice are transmitted by sexual contact. Symptoms, signs, diagnosis, and treatment differ by location of infestation. Lice are wingless, blood-sucking insects that infest the head ( Pediculus humanus var. capitis ), body ( P. humanus var. corporis ), or pubis ( Phthirus pubis ). The 3 kinds of lice differ substantially in morphology and clinical features (see Figure: ). Head lice and pubic lice live directly (...) (eg, military barracks) and in people of low socioeconomic status. Transmission is by sharing of contaminated clothing and bedding. Body lice are main vectors of , , and . Body Louse (Pediculus humanus var. corporis) Image courtesy of the World Health Organization and the Public Health Image Library of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Body lice cause pruritus; signs are small red puncta caused by bites, usually associated with linear scratch marks, urticaria, or superficial

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

334. Physiological consequences of the salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) on juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha): implications for wild salmon ecology and management, and for salmon aquaculture Full Text available with Trip Pro

Physiological consequences of the salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) on juvenile pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha): implications for wild salmon ecology and management, and for salmon aquaculture Pink salmon, Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, are the most abundant wild salmon species and are thought of as an indicator of ecosystem health. The salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, is endemic to pink salmon habitat but these ectoparasites have been implicated in reducing local pink salmon (...) populations in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia. This allegation arose largely because juvenile pink salmon migrate past commercial open net salmon farms, which are known to incubate the salmon louse. Juvenile pink salmon are thought to be especially sensitive to this ectoparasite because they enter the sea at such a small size (approx. 0.2 g). Here, we describe how 'no effect' thresholds for salmon louse sublethal impacts on juvenile pink salmon were determined using physiological principles

2012 Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

335. Correlation between body size and fecundity in fish louse Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Correlation between body size and fecundity in fish louse Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura) The life history traits like fecundity and body size are useful predictors of life history strategies of organisms. The information on these aspects provided necessary input for control measures for ectoparasites. In view of this, the variations in the life history traits of the fish louse Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna (1951) were assessed using age as an explanatory factor

2012 Journal of Parasitic Diseases: Official Organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology

336. Human louse-transmitted infectious diseases. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Human louse-transmitted infectious diseases. Several of the infectious diseases associated with human lice are life-threatening, including epidemic typhus, relapsing fever, and trench fever, which are caused by Rickettsia prowazekii, Borrelia recurrentis, and Bartonella quintana, respectively. Although these diseases have been known for several centuries, they remain a major public health concern in populations living in poor-hygiene conditions because of war, social disruption, severe poverty (...) , or gaps in public health management. Poor-hygiene conditions favour a higher prevalence of body lice, which are the main vectors for these diseases. Trench fever has been reported in both developing and developed countries in populations living in poor conditions, such as homeless individuals. In contrast, outbreaks of epidemic typhus and epidemic relapsing fever have occurred in jails and refugee camps in developing countries. However, reports of a significantly high seroprevalence for epidemic

2012 Clinical Microbiology and Infection

337. Head lice prevalence among households in Norway: importance of spatial variables and individual and household characteristics Full Text available with Trip Pro

Head lice prevalence among households in Norway: importance of spatial variables and individual and household characteristics Head lice prevalence varies greatly between and within countries, and more knowledge is needed to approach causes of this variation. In the present study, we investigated head lice prevalence among elementary school students and their households in relation to individual and household characteristics as well as spatial variables. The investigation included households (...) , which suggested that interactions between children in the same school are important for head lice transmission. Previous occurrence of head lice in homes also increased the risk of present infestation. Prevalence of previous infestations was higher in households with more children and in more densely populated municipalities, indicating that the density of hosts or groups of hosts influences transmission rates. These results demonstrate that information of hosts' spatial distribution as well

2011 Parasitology

338. Head lice Full Text available with Trip Pro

Head lice Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group.We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other

2011 BMJ Clinical Evidence

339. An Efficacy and Safety Study of Ha44 Gel Administered Topically for the Treatment of Head Lice Infestation

: January 19, 2015 Last Update Posted : January 19, 2015 Sponsor: Hatchtech Pty Ltd Information provided by (Responsible Party): Hatchtech Pty Ltd Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Phase 2 study to assess the safety and effectiveness of a product to treat children and adults with head lice Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Pediculosis Drug: Group A - Low-Dose Ha44 0.37% w/w Drug: Group B - High Dose Ha44 Gel 0.74% w/w Drug: Group C - Placebo Phase 2 Study Design Go (...) of at least 33 pounds Has an active head lice infestation at Day 0. An active infection is defined as at least 3 live lice for the index subject and at least 1 live louse for the other household members Belong to a household of no more than 6 members, except where additional household members are < 2 years of age Belong to a household with an eligible index subject between 2 and 12 years of age with active lice infestation Female subjects must be: of non-childbearing potential (no history of menstrual

2011 Clinical Trials

340. Efficacy of the LouseBuster, a new medical device for treating head lice (Anoplura:Pediculidae). (Abstract)

Efficacy of the LouseBuster, a new medical device for treating head lice (Anoplura:Pediculidae). Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer) occur worldwide and infest millions of children and adults every year. Head lice infestations, which are known as pediculosis capitis, are psychologically stressful, physically irritating, and are one of the leading causes of K-6 school absence. The prevalence of head lice in many countries is increasing rapidly because of resistance to chemicals (...) used in many head lice treatments. We tested the efficacy of an alternative method for controlling head lice, the LouseBuster, a custom-built medical device designed to kill head lice and their eggs using controlled, heated air. A total of 56 infested subjects was treated with the LouseBuster, and the efficacy of the treatment was evaluated by comparing the viability of lice and eggs on randomly assigned pre- and posttreatment sides of each subject's scalp. We evaluate treatment efficacy

2011 Journal of medical entomology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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