How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

39,934 results for

Learning Disabilities

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Patient education aimed at adults with intellectual disabilities and simultaneous diabetes for self-care of diabetes

Patient education aimed at adults with intellectual disabilities and simultaneous diabetes for self-care of diabetes Patient education aimed at adults with intellectual disabilities and simultaneous diabetes for self-care of diabetes We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Patient education aimed at adults with intellectual disabilities (...) and simultaneous diabetes for self-care of diabetes Share: Reading time approx. 6 minutes Diabetes is a condition that requires lifelong adaptation to healthy living habits and, as needed, to medication. Diabetes is more common in people with intellectual disabilities than in the rest of the population. For people with intellectual disabilities and diabetes to have a good quality of life, they need, like other patient groups with diabetes, education and support for self-care. For this purpose, a patient

2020 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

2. Screening for glucose intolerance and development of a lifestyle education programme for prevention of type 2 diabetes in a population with intellectual disabilities: the STOP Diabetes research project Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for glucose intolerance and development of a lifestyle education programme for prevention of type 2 diabetes in a population with intellectual disabilities: the STOP Diabetes research project Screening for glucose intolerance and development of a lifestyle education programme for prevention of type 2 diabetes in a population with intellectual disabilities: the STOP Diabetes research project Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again (...) of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK 3 School of Health & Related Research, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK 4 Leicester Diabetes Centre, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK 5 Learning Disabilities Service, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, Leicester, UK 6 Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK * Corresponding author Email: {{metadata.Journal}} Volume: {{metadata.Volume}}, Issue: {{metadata.Issue}}, Published

2017 NIHR HTA programme

3. The perception and experiences of Physical Education Teachers and Learning Support Educators when teaching physical activity and sports with students with Intellectual Disability an integrative review

The perception and experiences of Physical Education Teachers and Learning Support Educators when teaching physical activity and sports with students with Intellectual Disability an integrative review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2020 PROSPERO

4. What are the most effective practices (for example, communication and training) to enable health, social care and education professionals to meet the combined health, social care and education needs of disabled children and young people with severe comple

What are the most effective practices (for example, communication and training) to enable health, social care and education professionals to meet the combined health, social care and education needs of disabled children and young people with severe comple Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied

2020 PROSPERO

5. How can health care workers help young people not in employment education or training (NEETs) transition into work?

in children’s and adult services in their area and develop new partnerships and services to support young adults with life-limiting conditions - details of area contacts are available here" (31). Several areas in England provide transition services to help young people into work, education or training. Brighton and Hove have a transition forum which reports into children's services and the Learning Disability Partnership Board. Northumberland Care Trust, which provides adult social care services (...) How can health care workers help young people not in employment education or training (NEETs) transition into work? Knowledge & Library Services (KLS) Evidence Briefing How can health care workers help young people not in employment, education or training (NEETs) transition into work? Caroline De Brún 15 th February 2018 How can health care workers help young people not in employment, education or training (NEETs) transition into work? KLS Evidence Briefing 15 th February 2018 Question

2018 Public Health England - Evidence Briefings

6. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability

, speech and language therapists, educational staff, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, physicians, paediatricians, and pharmacists. Additionally: Referral to a clinical psychologist may be necessary if the person requires assessment for purposes such as accessing benefits, determining mental capacity, and/or determining fitness to plead within the criminal justice system. Note: this can be a direct referral or may be made via the community learning disability service/team depending on urgency (...) Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability Scenario: Suspected learning disability | Management | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Suspected learning disability Learning disabilities: Scenario: Suspected learning disability Last revised in October 2018 Scenario: Suspected learning disability From age 1 month onwards. How should I manage a person with a suspected learning disability? Note: Where a learning disability is suspected assess

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability?

Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability? Diagnosis | Diagnosis | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Diagnosis Learning disabilities: When should I suspect a learning disability? Last revised in October 2018 When should I suspect a learning disability? Where a learning disability is suspected, assess the person's t o make decisions throughout assessment, care, and treatment on a decision-by-decision basis. In practice, most people with learning (...) disabilities seen in primary care will have already received a specialist diagnosis. This may be based on neurodevelopmental assessment, and/or on a pre-existing condition for which some degree of learning disability is a component (such as Down's syndrome). In rare cases, children or adults may present in primary care with a suspected learning disability. In such cases: Take a history, bearing in mind the person's communication needs and level of understanding. Wherever possible/appropriate, speak

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability

Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Scenario: Confirmed learning disability | Management | Learning disabilities | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Learning disabilities: Scenario: Confirmed learning disability Last revised in October 2018 Scenario: Confirmed learning disability From age 1 month onwards. How should I manage a person with a confirmed learning disability? Note: When managing a person with a learning disability (...) , evaluate their to make decisions throughout assessment, care, and treatment on a decision-by-decision basis, and be mindful of their . Primary care practitioners should regularly review the communication needs of people with learning disabilities as they grow older to find out if they have changed. People with a confirmed learning disability are likely to receive care via a local multidisciplinary learning disability support service/team, who (depending on local availability) may be involved

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Challenging behaviour and learning disabilities: prevention and interventions for people with learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges

with the criminal justice system. It is relatively common for people with a learning disability to develop behaviour that challenges, and more common for people with more severe disability. Prevalence rates are around 5–15% in educational, health or social care services for people with a learning disability. Rates are higher in teenagers and people in their early 20s, and in particular settings (for example, 30–40% in hospital settings). People with a learning disability who also have communication difficulties (...) of the extent and severity of the behaviour that challenges provide skills training and emotional support, or information about these, to help them take part in and support interventions for the person with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges. Early identification of the emergence of behaviour that challenges Everyone involved in caring for and supporting children, young people and adults with a learning disability (including family members and carers) should understand the risk of behaviour

2015 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

10. Interactive Learning Environments for the Educational Improvement of Students With Disabilities in Special Schools Full Text available with Trip Pro

Interactive Learning Environments for the Educational Improvement of Students With Disabilities in Special Schools Providing an inclusive and quality education for all contributes toward the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. High-quality learning environments based on what works in education benefit all students and can be particularly beneficial for children with disabilities. This article contributes to advance knowledge to enhance the quality of education of students (...) with disabilities that are educated in special schools. This research analyses in which ways, if any, interactive learning environments can be developed in special schools and create better learning opportunities for children with disabilities. A case study was conducted with students with disabilities (N = 36) and teaching staff in a special school, involving interviews and focus groups. We argue that rethinking the learning context by introducing instruction models based on interaction benefit children

2018 Frontiers in psychology

11. Engaging persons with disabilities as community teachers for experiential learning in occupational therapy education Full Text available with Trip Pro

Engaging persons with disabilities as community teachers for experiential learning in occupational therapy education Cultivating empathy towards persons with disabilities has been highlighted as an essential graduate attribute in the occupational therapy profession.With the aim to developing a more holistic understanding of disability, this project seeks to translate an experiential learning activity developed in Canada to the local Singaporean context. Small groups of two to three students (...) of the learning activity.Findings: Comparison of pre- and post-scores using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests of all three subscales of the Multidimensional Attitudes Scale Towards Persons with Disabilities yielded significant improvements. The average score for Affect improved from 42.94 to 32.08, z = -5.43, P <  .001; for Cognition improved from 26.12 to 21.41, z = -4.20, P <  .001; for Behaviour improved from 23.78 to 20.65, z= -4.44, P <  .001. Effect sizes ranged from medium to large. Thematic analysis of focus

2018 Hong Kong journal of Occupational Therapy : HKJOT

12. Interactive Apps Promote Learning of Basic Mathematics in Children With Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Full Text available with Trip Pro

Interactive Apps Promote Learning of Basic Mathematics in Children With Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Interactive apps delivered on touch-screen tablets can be effective at supporting the acquisition of basic skills in mainstream primary school children. This technology may also be beneficial for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) as it can promote high levels of engagement with the learning task and an inclusive learning environment. However, few (...) to the national curriculum. To assess learning gains, rate of progress (minutes per topic) for each pupil was determined by calculating the average time taken to complete a topic. Progress rate was then correlated with teacher ratings of extent of disability and independent ratings of pupil engagement with the apps. Results showed SEND pupils could interact with the apps and all pupils passed at least one topic. Average progress rate for SEND pupils was twice as long as mainstream peers. Stepwise regression

2018 Frontiers in psychology

13. Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities

in the person's daily life. 1.6.9 Social care providers should work in partnership with healthcare providers to share knowledge about the person and to develop expertise for end of life care. Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities (NG96) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 27 of 381.6.10 Provide training, information and support for family members and carers, for example, in medication (...) , including older people's services, adult learning disability services, employment, education and criminal justice services People with learning disabilities, their families, carers and advocates Care and support of people growing older with learning disabilities (NG96) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 38Conte Context xt People with learning disabilities are now living significantly longer

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

14. Learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges: service design and delivery

with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges Providers of related services, including housing, education, employment and criminal justice services Practitioners working with children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges in other services or settings, including education, housing, voluntary and community services, employment and criminal justice services Children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges (...) on the principle that children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges should have the support they need to live where and how they want. It will help local areas shift their focus towards prevention and early intervention, enabling children, young people and adults to live in their communities, and increasing support for families and carers. This should reduce the need for people to move away from their home or community for care, education or treatment. The guideline

2018 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

15. A Successful Standardized Academic Inter-professional Post-licensure Education Program Exists to Train MSK Professionals to Become Advanced Practitioners in Arthritis Care: Lessons Learned from the ACPAC Program. (Abstract)

A Successful Standardized Academic Inter-professional Post-licensure Education Program Exists to Train MSK Professionals to Become Advanced Practitioners in Arthritis Care: Lessons Learned from the ACPAC Program. We read with interest the article in the most recent issue of Arthritis Care & Research "Core Curriculum to Facilitate the Expansion of a Rheumatology Practice to Include Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants" by Benjamin J. Smith et al., Vol 70(5) May 2018: pp 672-678. We can (...) all agree that rapid access to rheumatology care has become increasingly important as early aggressive treatment with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and/or biologic agents can prevent irreversible joint damage and long-term disability in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). We were surprised, however, that reference to the efforts and successes of an already existing curricular-based and rigorously evaluated inter-professional, post-licensure education program- the Advanced

2018 Arthritis care & research

16. Obesity, weight management and people with learning disabilities

Obesity, weight management and people with learning disabilities Obesity, weight management and people with learning disabilities - GOV.UK Tell us whether you accept cookies We use about how you use GOV.UK. We use this information to make the website work as well as possible and improve government services. Accept all cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance and support Guidance Obesity, weight management and people with learning disabilities Guidance (...) to help health and social care professionals and family members support people with learning disabilities to lose weight. Published 8 May 2016 Last updated 11 September 2020 — From: Documents Ref: PHE publications gateway number 2016205 . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Ref: PHE publications gateway number 2016205 HTML Details This guidance gives advice about specific aspects of weight management for people with learning disabilities

2020 Public Health England

17. Covid-19: Management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both

response in hospitals. We may also need to work outside our specific areas of training and expertise and the General Medical Council (GMC) has already indicated its support for this in the exceptional circumstances we may face: www.gmc-uk.org/news/news-archive/how-we-will-continue-to-regulate-in-light-of- novel-coronavirus As a clinician working in other fields you may have had limited clinical contact with people with a learning disability or people with autism, however in 2018/19 at least 41 (...) Covid-19: Management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both Publications approval reference: 001559 NHS England and NHS Improvement Speciality guides for patient management during the coronavirus pandemic Clinical guide for front line staff to support the management of patients with a learning disability, autism or both during the coronavirus pandemic – relevant to all clinical specialities 24 March 2020 Version 1 “…and there are no more surgeons, urologists, orthopaedists, we

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

18. What are the most effective ways that health, social care and education services can work together to support disabled children and young people with severe complex needs to participate in and benefit from education and social activities?

What are the most effective ways that health, social care and education services can work together to support disabled children and young people with severe complex needs to participate in and benefit from education and social activities? Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission

2020 PROSPERO

19. Learning disabilities: Tai Chi, Wii Fit and rope skipping exercise interventions are particularly effective in improving balance for young people with intellectual disabilities

Learning disabilities: Tai Chi, Wii Fit and rope skipping exercise interventions are particularly effective in improving balance for young people with intellectual disabilities Tai Chi, Wii Fit and rope skipping exercise interventions are particularly effective in improving balance for young people with intellectual disabilities | Evidence-Based Nursing Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Tai Chi, Wii Fit and rope skipping exercise interventions are particularly effective in improving balance for young people with intellectual disabilities Article Text Commentary Learning disabilities Tai Chi, Wii Fit and rope skipping exercise interventions are particularly

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

20. The effect of disability awareness educational program of university students in the department of physical therapy on reducing prejudices against people with disabilities and increasing positive attitudes toward people with disabilities Full Text available with Trip Pro

The effect of disability awareness educational program of university students in the department of physical therapy on reducing prejudices against people with disabilities and increasing positive attitudes toward people with disabilities [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of disability awareness educational program of university students in the department of physical therapy on reducing prejudice against people with disabilities and increasing positive attitudes (...) toward people with disabilities. [Participants and Methods] Students who participated in the disability awareness educational program were selected as experiment group and 15 students who did not take program were selected as control group. [Results] First, in the comparisons between the control and experimental group, there was no difference in the overall prejudice on people with disabilities and positive attitudes toward people with disabilities before the disability awareness educational program

2018 Journal of physical therapy science Controlled trial quality: uncertain

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>