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Lawn Mower Injury

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1. Pediatric Lawn-Mower Injuries Presenting at a Level-I Trauma Center, 1995 to 2015: A Danger to Our Youngest Children. (PubMed)

Pediatric Lawn-Mower Injuries Presenting at a Level-I Trauma Center, 1995 to 2015: A Danger to Our Youngest Children. Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children 0 to 18 years of age in the U.S. An estimated 9,400 to 17,000 pediatric lawn-mower injuries occur each year. The aims of this study were to better define the epidemiology of lawn-mower injuries and to identify predictors of severe lawn-mower injuries to optimize public education and injury (...) prevention.All patients 0 to 18 years of age who presented to Children's Mercy Hospital (CMH), Kansas City, Missouri, during the period of 1995 to 2015 after sustaining a lawn-mower injury were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes. Demographic information and data regarding primary outcome measures (death, amputation, need for prosthesis, Injury Severity Score [ISS]) and secondary outcome measures were collected. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used

2018 The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume

2. Lawn mower injuries presenting to the emergency department: 2005 to 2015. (PubMed)

Lawn mower injuries presenting to the emergency department: 2005 to 2015. The objective of this study was to describe recent trends in the epidemiology of lawn mower injuries presenting to the Emergency Department in the United States using nationally representative data for all ages.Data for this retrospective analysis were obtained from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), for the years 2005-2015. We queried the system using all (...) product codes under "lawn mowers" in the NEISS Coding Manual. We examined body part injured, types of injuries, gender and age distribution, and disposition.There were an estimated 934,394 lawn mower injuries treated in U.S. ED's from 2005 to 2015, with an average of 84,944 injuries annually. The most commonly injured body parts were the hand/finger (22.3%), followed by the lower extremity (16.2%). The most common type of injury was laceration (23.1%), followed by sprain/strain (18.8%). The mean age

2018 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

3. Children treated for lawn mower-related injuries in US emergency departments, 1990-2014. (PubMed)

Children treated for lawn mower-related injuries in US emergency departments, 1990-2014. Investigate the epidemiology of lawn mower-related injuries to children in the US.A retrospective analysis was conducted of children younger than 18years of age treated in US emergency departments for a lawn mower-related injury from 1990 through 2014 using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.An estimated 212,258 children <18years of age received emergency treatment for lawn mower (...) contact with a hot surface than older patients. A projectile was associated with 49.8% of all injuries among patients injured as bystanders. Patients injured as passengers or bystanders were more likely (RR 3.77; 95% CI: 2.74-5.19) to be admitted to the hospital than lawnmower operators.Lawn mower-related injuries continue to be a cause of serious morbidity among children. Although the annual injury rate decreased significantly over the study period, the number of injuries is still substantial

2017 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

4. Occult lawn mower projectile injury presenting with hemoptysis (PubMed)

Occult lawn mower projectile injury presenting with hemoptysis We present the case of a 72-year-old man with hemoptysis after a thoracic projectile injury, which occurred while mowing the lawn. Chest radiograph followed by a computed tomography angiogram revealed a metallic foreign body in the right middle lobe of the lung. The patient underwent a right anterolateral thoracotomy where the object was successfully retrieved. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery.

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2017 Radiology Case Reports

5. Lawn Mower Injury

Lawn Mower Injury Lawn Mower Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Lawn Mower Injury Lawn Mower Injury Aka: Lawn (...) Mower Injury From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Injuries often occur in children Age under 5 years Bystander (60%) Riding mower passenger (15%) Operator of mower (25%) Age 8 to 14 years Operator of mower Lawn Mower Injury associated with significant morbidity Average hospitalization stay: 10 to 24 days Amputation required in 64% of cases Permanent in U.S.: 2000 children per year Most common sites of injury Distal upper extremity Distal lower extremity III. Management: General Immediate vigorous

2018 FP Notebook

6. Lawn Mower Injury

Lawn Mower Injury Lawn Mower Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Lawn Mower Injury Lawn Mower Injury Aka: Lawn (...) Mower Injury From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Injuries often occur in children Age under 5 years Bystander (60%) Riding mower passenger (15%) Operator of mower (25%) Age 8 to 14 years Operator of mower Lawn Mower Injury associated with significant morbidity Average hospitalization stay: 10 to 24 days Amputation required in 64% of cases Permanent in U.S.: 2000 children per year Most common sites of injury Distal upper extremity Distal lower extremity III. Management: General Immediate vigorous

2015 FP Notebook

7. Letter: Lawn mower injuries. (PubMed)

Letter: Lawn mower injuries. 4425806 1975 01 22 2008 11 20 0007-1447 3 5932 1974 Sep 14 British medical journal Br Med J Letter: Lawn mower injuries. 687 Thompson R G RG Harper I A IA eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 0 Tetanus Toxoid AIM IM Accidents, Home Adult Amputation Gangrene etiology Humans Male Tetanus etiology Tetanus Toxoid administration & dosage Toes injuries Wound Infection therapy 1974 9 14 1974 9 14 0 1 1974 9 14 0 0 ppublish 4425806 PMC1611656

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1974 British medical journal

8. Letter: Lawn mower injuries. (PubMed)

Letter: Lawn mower injuries. 4152941 1974 11 06 2018 11 13 0007-1447 3 5923 1974 Jul 13 British medical journal Br Med J Letter: Lawn mower injuries. 113 Hulme J R JR Askew A R AR eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 AIM IM Accidents, Home Adult Child Foot Injuries Humans Wounds and Injuries 1974 7 13 1974 7 13 0 1 1974 7 13 0 0 ppublish 4152941 PMC1611085 Injury. 1974 Feb;5(3):217-20 4151272 Arch Ophthalmol. 1960 Sep;64:385-7 13797158

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1974 British medical journal

9. Unintentional Childhood Injuries

No off-road vehicles or lawn mower use <16 years old Use protective gear for activities helmets Protective gear in , snow boarding Protective gear in skateboarding and Adolescents Prevent injuries Wear s always No instant messaging (texting) or other distracting activity while driving (parents should model this) Risks: Speeding, tailgating, instant messaging and nighttime driving V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search (...) Unintentional Childhood Injuries Unintentional Childhood Injuries Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Unintentional

2018 FP Notebook

10. Unintentional Childhood Injuries

No off-road vehicles or lawn mower use <16 years old Use protective gear for activities helmets Protective gear in , snow boarding Protective gear in skateboarding and Adolescents Prevent injuries Wear s always No instant messaging (texting) or other distracting activity while driving (parents should model this) Risks: Speeding, tailgating, instant messaging and nighttime driving V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search (...) Unintentional Childhood Injuries Unintentional Childhood Injuries Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Unintentional

2015 FP Notebook

11. Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline

, logging, painters High Injury Chronic overuse with high force and repetitive overhead motion Shipyard welders and plate workers, fish processing workers, machine operators, ground workers (e.g. pushing a lawn mower), and carpenters. Medium Injury or occupational disease Moderate lifting Grocery checkers Low Injury or occupational disease There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the existence of “overuse syndrome”, i.e. an injury to one extremity causing the contralateral extremity (...) Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline Washington State Department of Labor and Industries Medical Treatment Guideline for Shoulder Diagnosis and Treatment –updated May 2018 Medical Treatment Guideline for Shoulder Diagnosis and Treatment Table of Contents I. Review Criteria for Shoulder Surgery 3 II. Introduction 12 III. Establishing Work-relatedness 12 A. Shoulder conditions as industrial injuries: 12 B. Shoulder conditions as occupational diseases: 13 IV. Making the Diagnosis

2018 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

12. Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline

be paid for this (use billing code 1055M). Additional billing information is available in the Attending Doctor’s Handbook. 9 Table 1: Exposure and Risk Exposure Examples of types of jobs Risk Type of shoulder claim Sudden trauma or fall on an outstretched arm Construction workers, logging, painters High Injury Chronic overuse with high force and repetitive overhead motion Shipyard welders and plate workers, fish processing workers, machine operators, ground workers (e.g. pushing a lawn mower (...) Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline 1 Hyperlink update September 2016 Shoulder Conditions Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Review Criteria for Shoulder Surgery II. Introduction III. Establishing Work-Relatedness A. Shoulder Conditions as Industrial Injuries B. Shoulder Conditions as Occupational Diseases IV. Making the Diagnosis A. History and Clinical Exam B. Diagnostic Imaging V. Treatment A. Conservative Treatment B. Surgical Treatment VI. Specific

2013 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

13. Wind Turbines and Health

120 Pneumatic Chipper (at 5 ft) 10 Rock-n-Roll Band 110 5 Textile Loom Power Lawn Mower (at operator’s ear) 2 100 Newspaper Press 1 90 Milling Machine (at 4 ft) 0.5 Diesel Truck 40 mph (at 50 ft) Garbage Disposal (at 3 ft) 0.2 80 0.1 Vacuum Cleaner 70 0.05 Passenger Car 50 mph (at 50 ft) Air Conditioning Window Unit (at 25 ft) 0.02 60 Conversation (at 3 ft) 0.01 50 Wind Turbine at 350 m 0.005 0.002 40 Quiet Room 0.001 30 0.0005 Soft Whisper (5 ft) 0.0002 20 Rustling Leaves 0.0001 10 Human (...) but are not likely to cause epileptic seizures at normal operational speeds of 18 to 45 rpm. • Ice Throw and Structural Failure. Risk of injury can be minimized with setbacks of 200 to 500 m, warning signs and/or gated access, and by implementing shutdown procedures during conditions that cause ice to form. Introduction Wind turbines are large towers with rotating blades that use wind to generate electricity (Figure 1). A wind farm is a collection of wind turbines. As of December 2012, wind farms produced 6500

2013 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

14. A miracle in the intensive care unit

Jeff fall to the ground as the lawn mower ran down the yard by itself. A neighbor ran over and looked at Jeff. He was lifeless, lips were blue, cyanotic, he was barely breathing, slow gasping breaths, his radial pulse was thready. And the neighbor reached out of his pocket, and called 911 on his cell phone. Jeff stopped breathing; his heart stopped. His neighbor started CPR immediately, fast and hard compressions on Jeff’s chest. Hoping that this was just a temporary nightmare. But Jeff never came (...) the body to 32 to 34 degrees Celsius. Since Jeff didn’t regain consciousness after his cardiac arrest, there was concern that Jeff had anoxic injury to his brain, easily caused during a cardiac arrest. Jeff, if he survived this, could end up in a vegetative state. Bridget and Sam, shuffled in the waiting room, came to visit Jeff in the ICU during visiting hours. As they walked through that ICU, they saw patient after patient, lifeless, on ventilators, hooked up, IVs, millions of IV drips, chest tubes

2016 KevinMD blog

15. Foot Infections (Follow-up)

and edema must be resolved prior to reconstruction. Lawn mower injuries Upward of 60,000 lawn mower injuries occur annually in the United States, most of them involving the lower extremities. Injuries can range from simple lacerations to more severe fractures and amputations. Because the setting for these injuries is inherently dirty, a wide variety of pathogens will be present. The combination of pathogens and severity of injury leads to a prolonged and expensive treatment course with an estimated (...) to suspect. Infections are the primary cause of instability and nonunion in open fractures. It has been estimated that 70% of open fractures are contaminated at the time of injury. [ ] Open fractures in the foot are often observed in persons with crush injuries, individuals involved in motor vehicle and pedestrian accidents, and persons with lawn mower–type injuries. Gustilo et al developed the following classification system for open fractures and demonstrated that the incidence of infection

2014 eMedicine Surgery

16. Foot Infections (Diagnosis)

and edema must be resolved prior to reconstruction. Lawn mower injuries Upward of 60,000 lawn mower injuries occur annually in the United States, most of them involving the lower extremities. Injuries can range from simple lacerations to more severe fractures and amputations. Because the setting for these injuries is inherently dirty, a wide variety of pathogens will be present. The combination of pathogens and severity of injury leads to a prolonged and expensive treatment course with an estimated (...) to suspect. Infections are the primary cause of instability and nonunion in open fractures. It has been estimated that 70% of open fractures are contaminated at the time of injury. [ ] Open fractures in the foot are often observed in persons with crush injuries, individuals involved in motor vehicle and pedestrian accidents, and persons with lawn mower–type injuries. Gustilo et al developed the following classification system for open fractures and demonstrated that the incidence of infection

2014 eMedicine Surgery

17. Hymenoptera Stings (Diagnosis)

systemic release of mast cells and basophil mediators. [ ] , vasodilation, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, and are prominent symptoms of the reaction. Respiratory arrest may result in refractory cases. Previous Next: Etiology Hymenoptera are social creatures that typically sting to protect their colony, nest, or hive. Most stings are incited by proximity to the colony. Noisy or vigorous activity (eg, lawn mowers, weed eaters), bright or dark colors, and perfumes also may incite stings. When a colony (...) occasionally when toxins directly stimulate mast cells. In addition to immunologic mechanisms, some injury occurs from direct toxicity. While the vast majority of stings cause only minor problems, stings cause a significant number of deaths. Western paper wasp (Mischocyttarus flavitarsis) building a nest. By Sanjay Acharya (self-made at Sunnyvale, California, USA). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Yellow jacket. By Richard Bartz, Munich aka Makro Freak (Own work). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Fire ants. US

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Hymenoptera Stings (Treatment)

, they should adhere to the following suggestions: Avoid using perfumes or hygiene products that include perfumes, as these may attract flying Hymenoptera. Avoid wearing bright colors. Avoid known hive or nest locations. Do not use noisy equipment such as lawn mowers, edgers, or blowers within 50 yards of beehives or 150 yards of Africanized bee colonies. Do not flail arms when confronted by bees or wasps because smashing one often incites others to sting. Following severe reactions, individuals should (...) , Caimmi S, Gallen C, Demoly P. Severe anaphylaxis to bee venom immunotherapy: efficacy of pretreatment and concurrent treatment with omalizumab. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol . 2009. 19(3):225-9. . Hernandez M, Gonzalez S, Galindo G, Iaz A, Rodriguez P. University Hospital, et al. Reactions to hymenoptera sting in adult patients: experience in a clinical allergy/immunology service in Monterrey Mexico. World Allergy Organization Journal . 2007/11. S216-S217. Pegula S, Kato A. Fatal injuries

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Hymenoptera Stings (Overview)

systemic release of mast cells and basophil mediators. [ ] , vasodilation, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, and are prominent symptoms of the reaction. Respiratory arrest may result in refractory cases. Previous Next: Etiology Hymenoptera are social creatures that typically sting to protect their colony, nest, or hive. Most stings are incited by proximity to the colony. Noisy or vigorous activity (eg, lawn mowers, weed eaters), bright or dark colors, and perfumes also may incite stings. When a colony (...) occasionally when toxins directly stimulate mast cells. In addition to immunologic mechanisms, some injury occurs from direct toxicity. While the vast majority of stings cause only minor problems, stings cause a significant number of deaths. Western paper wasp (Mischocyttarus flavitarsis) building a nest. By Sanjay Acharya (self-made at Sunnyvale, California, USA). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Yellow jacket. By Richard Bartz, Munich aka Makro Freak (Own work). Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. Fire ants. US

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Hymenoptera Stings (Follow-up)

, they should adhere to the following suggestions: Avoid using perfumes or hygiene products that include perfumes, as these may attract flying Hymenoptera. Avoid wearing bright colors. Avoid known hive or nest locations. Do not use noisy equipment such as lawn mowers, edgers, or blowers within 50 yards of beehives or 150 yards of Africanized bee colonies. Do not flail arms when confronted by bees or wasps because smashing one often incites others to sting. Following severe reactions, individuals should (...) , Caimmi S, Gallen C, Demoly P. Severe anaphylaxis to bee venom immunotherapy: efficacy of pretreatment and concurrent treatment with omalizumab. J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol . 2009. 19(3):225-9. . Hernandez M, Gonzalez S, Galindo G, Iaz A, Rodriguez P. University Hospital, et al. Reactions to hymenoptera sting in adult patients: experience in a clinical allergy/immunology service in Monterrey Mexico. World Allergy Organization Journal . 2007/11. S216-S217. Pegula S, Kato A. Fatal injuries

2014 eMedicine.com

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