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Laser Skin Procedure

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3461. Can you give guidance how to differentiate between a clinically indicated minor ops skin procedure and one that is regarded as a cosmetic procedure? Patients are often keen to have lesions removed sta

Can you give guidance how to differentiate between a clinically indicated minor ops skin procedure and one that is regarded as a cosmetic procedure? Patients are often keen to have lesions removed sta Can you give guidance how to differentiate between a clinically indicated minor ops skin procedure and one that is regarded as a cosmetic procedure? Patients are often keen to have lesions removed stating they are nuisance or catching on clothes. - Trip Database or use your Google+ account (...) questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Can you give guidance how to differentiate between a clinically indicated minor ops skin procedure and one that is regarded as a cosmetic procedure? Patients are often keen to have lesions removed stating they are nuisance or catching on clothes. The NHS Modernisation Agency has published guidance for commissioners of plastic surgery services which states: “Cosmetic Surgery (surgery undertaken exclusively to improve appearance) will usually

2006 TRIP Answers

3462. Measurement Skin Temperature During Pulsed Laser Exposure

localized heating in the epidermis, which may, if not controlled, produce permanent complications such as hypertrophic scarring or dyspigmentation. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Port-Wine Stain Procedure: cooling spray during laser treatment Phase 2 Detailed Description: The researchers want to establish a correlation between non-invasive skin temperature measurements and the minimum laser energy during skin laser treatment using cryogen spray cooling. This study would eliminate (...) (CSC) Plus Laser Treatment. 3.Contact Cooling Plus Laser Treatment. Study Start Date : July 2002 Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2010 Actual Study Completion Date : March 2010 Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: cooling spray cooling spray during laser treatment Procedure: cooling spray during laser treatment skin temperature measurement Other Name: laser treatment Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : skin temperature during laser treatment

2007 Clinical Trials

3463. Molecular Mechanisms of Helium-Neon Laser on Melanocyte Regeneration in Skin Equivalent Vitiligo Model

Molecular Mechanisms of Helium-Neon Laser on Melanocyte Regeneration in Skin Equivalent Vitiligo Model Molecular Mechanisms of Helium-Neon Laser on Melanocyte Regeneration in Skin Equivalent Vitiligo Model - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Molecular Mechanisms of Helium-Neon Laser on Melanocyte Regeneration in Skin Equivalent Vitiligo Model The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00172939 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified March 2005 by National Taiwan University Hospital

2005 Clinical Trials

3464. S-Caineâ„¢ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Pulsed Dye Laser (PDL) Therapy in Adults

S-Caineâ„¢ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Pulsed Dye Laser (PDL) Therapy in Adults S-Caine™ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Pulsed Dye Laser (PDL) Therapy in Adults - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove (...) one or more studies before adding more. S-Caine™ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Pulsed Dye Laser (PDL) Therapy in Adults The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00110773 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : May 13, 2005 Last Update Posted : June 5, 2012 Sponsor

2005 Clinical Trials

3465. S-Caineâ„¢ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Non-Ablative Facial Laser Resurfacing in Adults

the right treatment area and then from the left treatment area. Following removal of the study drugs, the investigator or physician subinvestigator evaluated each study drug application site for erythema, edema, blanching or other skin reactions. The right treatment area was evaluated first, followed by the left treatment area. After the skin evaluations, the laser procedure was performed on the right treatment area, followed by patient and investigator efficacy evaluations for the right treatment area (...) S-Caineâ„¢ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Non-Ablative Facial Laser Resurfacing in Adults S-Caine™ Peel (Skin Numbing Cream) to Treat Pain During Non-Ablative Facial Laser Resurfacing in Adults - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100

2005 Clinical Trials

3466. Evaluation of the Candela 1064nm:Nd:YAG Laser for Skin Tightening

and measurements will be taken using consistent procedures at each visit by viewing the baseline photograph and using landmarks such as freckles and birthmarks. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 22 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Evaluation of the Candela 1064nm:Nd:YAG Laser for Skin Tightening Study Start Date (...) Evaluation of the Candela 1064nm:Nd:YAG Laser for Skin Tightening Evaluation of the Candela 1064nm:Nd:YAG Laser for Skin Tightening - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Evaluation of the Candela

2007 Clinical Trials

3467. Low Fluence 1064nm Laser Hair Reduction for Pseudofolliculitis Barbae in Skin Types IV, V, VI

Low Fluence 1064nm Laser Hair Reduction for Pseudofolliculitis Barbae in Skin Types IV, V, VI Low Fluence 1064nm Laser Hair Reduction for Pseudofolliculitis Barbae in Skin Types IV, V, VI - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. Low Fluence 1064nm Laser Hair Reduction for Pseudofolliculitis Barbae in Skin Types IV, V, VI The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00402129 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : November 22, 2006 Last Update Posted : November 22, 2006 Sponsor

2006 Clinical Trials

3468. Intraoral hair removal on skin graft using Nd:YAG laser. (PubMed)

Intraoral hair removal on skin graft using Nd:YAG laser. This case report is a demonstration of the efficacy of laser hair removal on a graft site intraorally. A Polaris Long Pulse Nd:YAG laser was used for the procedures.

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2007 British Dental Journal

3469. Erbium:YAG laser-assisted preparation of a combined dermal/full thickness sandwich skin graft. (PubMed)

Erbium:YAG laser-assisted preparation of a combined dermal/full thickness sandwich skin graft. Skin grafting is a common procedure to close defects after tumor resection. However, delicate areas such as the heel or the sole of the foot can be closed with a specially designed graft as described in this article.To describe a surgical technique by means of erbium:YAG laser-assisted preparation of a combined dermal/full-thickness sandwich skin graft that facilitates the closure of defects (...) , especially at mechanically stressed anatomic sites.Tumor defects on the sole of the foot of 28 patients were closed with a new dermal/full-thickness sandwich skin graft. To obtain this special graft, half of a full-thickness skin graft twice the size of the wound defect was deepithelialized with an erbium:YAG laser. After complete defatting of the transplant, the deepithelialized part was folded beneath the full-thickness part (upside down) resulting in a sandwich graft, enabling contact of the papillary

2006 Dermatologic Surgery

3470. 1,450 nm long-pulsed diode laser for nonablative skin rejuvenation. (PubMed)

1,450 nm long-pulsed diode laser for nonablative skin rejuvenation. There has been growing patient demand for laser technology to treat rhytids and to refine skin texture without the associated lifestyle hindrance common to ablative cutaneous procedures. Nonablative laser systems have been developed to meet this need and, in many instances, have replaced ablative lasers as the preferred treatment modality.To review long-pulsed diode laser technology in the treatment of a variety of cutaneous (...) disorders.All publications involving 1,450 nm long-pulsed diode laser technology were reviewed and discussed.The latest generation of nonablative lasers, in the midinfrared electromagnetic spectrum, selectively targets and heats dermal tissue to stimulate collagen remodeling while sparing the epidermis.Demonstrating efficacy in the treatment of a wide range of cutaneous disorders, including facial rhytids, acne vulgaris, and atrophic scars, the 1,450 nm diode laser is a useful addition to the nonablative

2005 Dermatologic Surgery

3471. Nonablative 1450-nm diode laser in the treatment of facial atrophic acne scars in type IV to V Asian skin: a prospective clinical study. (PubMed)

completed 6 treatments (17.3% vs 5.0%). Main side effects were mild to moderate pain during the procedure, transient erythema, and hyperpigmentation which occurred in 39% of treated patients.The nonablative 1450 nm diode laser may be effective in achieving mild to moderate gradual clinical improvement in the treatment of facial atrophic acne scars. The procedure is associated with minimal downtime and is safe for use in darker skin types IV and V. (...) Nonablative 1450-nm diode laser in the treatment of facial atrophic acne scars in type IV to V Asian skin: a prospective clinical study. There is presently little published data on the clinical effectiveness of nonablative lasers in the treatment of atrophic acne scars and the safety of their use in patients with darker skin types.This study aims to determine the clinical effectiveness and safety of the nonablative 1450 nm diode laser with cryogen cooling spray in the treatment of facial

2004 Dermatologic Surgery

3472. Efficacy of the flashlamp-pumped pulsed-dye laser in nonsurgical delay of skin flaps. (PubMed)

Efficacy of the flashlamp-pumped pulsed-dye laser in nonsurgical delay of skin flaps. The purpose of this article was to determine the effectiveness of laser delay by use of the flashlamp-pumped pulsed-dye laser operating at a wavelength of 585 nm; to elucidate the comparable or dissimilar macroscopic, microscopic, and hemodynamic changes between laser and surgical delay methods; and to clarify the possible mechanisms underlying the delay effect of laser.A standardized caudally based random (...) dorsal rat flap model was used in this study: Acute random skin flaps served as control subjects (group 1). Surgical delay was employed by incision of lateral longitudinal borders both without (group 2) and with (group 3) undermining, and laser delay methods were performed by laser irradiation of both lateral longitudinal borders (group 4) and the entire surface (group 5) of the proposed flap. Evaluation was done by histologic examination, India ink injection, laser Doppler perfusion imaging

2003 Dermatologic Surgery

3473. Evaluation of the role of exogenous estrogen in postoperative progress after laser skin resurfacing. (PubMed)

Evaluation of the role of exogenous estrogen in postoperative progress after laser skin resurfacing. Recent studies indicate that exogenous estrogens may promote wound healing. Many laser skin resurfacing (LSR) patients use hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or oral contraceptive pills (OCPs).To evaluate the effect of exogenous estrogen on LSR postoperative healing.This is a retrospective case control study of 44 female patients who underwent combination CO2/Er:YAG full-face LSR. Sixteen (...) postmenopausal patients using oral HRT during procedure and follow-up were compared with 16 controls. Six premenopausal patients on estrogen-containing OCPs during the procedure and follow-up were compared with six controls. Case and control groups were matched by age, skin type, and treatment technique. Premenopausal and postmenopausal groups were compared. The variables evaluated included erythema, swelling, crusting, purpura, pain, pruritus, reepithelialization, complications, and patient assessment

2003 Dermatologic Surgery

3474. Single-pass carbon dioxide versus multiple-pass Er:YAG laser skin resurfacing: a comparison of postoperative wound healing and side-effect rates. (PubMed)

Single-pass carbon dioxide versus multiple-pass Er:YAG laser skin resurfacing: a comparison of postoperative wound healing and side-effect rates. Ablative laser skin resurfacing with carbon dioxide (CO2) and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) lasers has been popularized in recent years and their side effects individually reported. No prior study, however, has directly compared the relative healing times and complications rates between the two different systems.To evaluate and compare (...) postoperative wound healing and short- and long-term side effects of single-pass CO2 and multiple-pass, long-pulsed Er:YAG laser skin resurfacing for the treatment of facial photodamage and atrophic scars.A retrospective chart review and analysis of sequential clinical photographs were performed in 100 consecutive patients who underwent laser skin resurfacing with single-pass CO2 (Ultrapulse 5000; Coherent, Palo Alto, CA, N=50) or multiple-pass, long-pulsed Er:YAG laser resurfacing (Contour; Sciton, Palo

2003 Dermatologic Surgery

3475. Single-pass carbon dioxide laser skin resurfacing combined with cold-air cooling: efficacy and patient satisfaction of a prospective side-by-side study. (PubMed)

Single-pass carbon dioxide laser skin resurfacing combined with cold-air cooling: efficacy and patient satisfaction of a prospective side-by-side study. Ablative skin resurfacing with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and erbium:YAG lasers is still considered the gold standard for treating rhytides, photodamage, and acne scars. However, the prolonged downtime and undesired concomitant effects that are involved have sent dermatologists looking for less invasive nonablative laser techniques to rejuvenate (...) skin.To combine cold-air cooling with single-pass CO(2) laser skin resurfacing to generate as much benefit as possible while minimizing the spectrum of adverse effects.The efficacy of single-pass CO(2) laser skin resurfacing on perioral and periorbital wrinkles was examined prospectively during a 6-month follow-up period. In a side-by-side comparison, the influence of simultaneous cold-air cooling on concomitant effects, pain tolerance, therapeutic success, and patient satisfaction was also studied

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2004 Archives of Dermatology

3476. A prospective survey of patient experiences after laser skin resurfacing: results from 2 1/2 years of follow-up. (PubMed)

A prospective survey of patient experiences after laser skin resurfacing: results from 2 1/2 years of follow-up. Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) is a common cosmetic surgical procedure, yet there are no prospective long-term studies on patients' perceptions of their procedure.To prospectively document patients' subjective experiences after LSR.Twenty-seven consecutive patients who underwent combination carbon dioxide/erbium:YAG full-face laser resurfacing for acne scarring or photodamage were (...) surveyed at postoperative days 1 and 3, within 1 week, at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 30 months and asked standardized questions.Referral-based academic practice.One day after LSR, 10 patients (37%) were concerned about the outcome, and 3 (11%) considered it a "terrible" experience. At 2.7 days after the procedure, 23 patients (85%) would recommend LSR, and after 3.7 days, 24 (89%) would have the procedure again. At 3 months, the patients' mean rating of appearance was 2.3 (0-3 scale), and all 27

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2003 Archives of Dermatology

3477. Effect of carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on epidermal p53 immunostaining in photodamaged skin. (PubMed)

, the posttreatment repopulation of the epidermis with p53-negative keratinocytes should theoretically decrease the risk of malignant progression. Further study of laser resurfacing as a prophylactic procedure in patients at high risk for skin cancer development appears warranted. (...) Effect of carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on epidermal p53 immunostaining in photodamaged skin. To quantitatively examine changes in p53 tumor suppressor gene immunostaining after carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing of photodamaged skin to assess the potential value of this treatment in reducing the risk of progression to cutaneous carcinoma.Serial in vivo immunohistochemical analyses after laser therapy.Academic referral center, Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann

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2004 Archives of Dermatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3478. Split treatment of photodamaged skin with KTP 532 nm laser with 10 mm handpiece versus IPL: a cheek-to-cheek comparison. (PubMed)

Split treatment of photodamaged skin with KTP 532 nm laser with 10 mm handpiece versus IPL: a cheek-to-cheek comparison. The treatment of photodamaged skin with potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) has been reported in several studies. Each device has strengths and weaknesses; however, patient and device variability have made it difficult to ascertain the optimal device for photorejuvenation. The objective of this study was to obtain a head-to-head comparison (...) of IPL and KTP laser for photorejuvenation. Each patient received one KTP laser treatment on one side of the face and one IPL treatment on the other side.Seventeen patients with skin types I-IV were accepted into the study based on existence of dyschromias (pigmented and vascular) and/or discrete telangiectases. After performance of test spots on each patient to determine optimal settings for both devices, patients were treated with both devices in a split face manner. Evaluations and photographs

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2006 Lasers in surgery and medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3479. What is current best practice for the treatment of painful keloid scars in adult caucasian male, and what is the role of laser in this? If one uses laser to treat what is best practice procedure for a

What is current best practice for the treatment of painful keloid scars in adult caucasian male, and what is the role of laser in this? If one uses laser to treat what is best practice procedure for a What is current best practice for the treatment of painful keloid scars in adult caucasian male, and what is the role of laser in this? If one uses laser to treat what is best practice procedure for after-care? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Turning Research Into Practice ALL (...) @tripdatabase.com What is current best practice for the treatment of painful keloid scars in adult caucasian male, and what is the role of laser in this? If one uses laser to treat what is best practice procedure for after-care? ATTRACT has only found one guideline giving advice on the management of keloid scars (1) published in 2002. The abstract is reproduced below, full text is available to those with an Athens password. “ Many techniques for management of hypertrophic scars and keloids have been proven

2007 TRIP Answers

3480. Reticulate erythema following diode laser-assisted hair removal: a new side effect of a common procedure. (PubMed)

Reticulate erythema following diode laser-assisted hair removal: a new side effect of a common procedure. The popularity of laser-assisted hair removal has grown rapidly since April 3, 1995 when the Food and Drug Administration approved the introduction of the first hair removal laser system. Lasers with wavelengths in the red and infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum are most often used for hair removal because they effectively target melanin in the hair follicle and can potentially (...) penetrate to the appropriate depth of the dermis. Despite all efforts to protect the skin from damage, photoepilation may result in clinically significant adverse reactions. The most common and known side effects of laser hair removal include transient erythema, perifollicular edema, pain, folliculitis, hyper-pigmentation, hypopigmentation, crusting, purpura, erosions and scarring. The present report describes the appearance of a reticulate erythema after diode laser treatment for hair removal

2004 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

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