How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

240 results for

Lactose Breath Hydrogen Test

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

161. Diarrhea in Children

evaluation Sometimes hydrogen breath test Sometimes test for reducing substances in stool (to check for carbohydrates) and stool pH ( 6.0 indicates carbohydrates in stool) Cow's milk protein intolerance (milk protein allergy) Vomiting Diarrhea or constipation Hematochezia Anal fissures Failure to thrive Symptom resolution when cow's milk protein is eliminated Sometimes endoscopy or colonoscopy Excessive juice intake History of excessive juice or sugary drink intake (4–6 oz/day) Clinical evaluation (...) ) or reptiles ( Salmonella ) History of eating undercooked food ( Salmonella ) Recent ( 2 mo) antibiotic use ( C. difficile ) Day care center outbreak Stool culture Fecal leukocytes If patients appear ill, CBC, renal function tests, and blood culture If patient has recently been given antibiotics, stool testing for C. difficile toxin or food poisoning Allergy: Urticarial rash, lip swelling, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing within minutes to several hours after eating Poisoning

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

162. Helicobacter pylori

, producing labelled that can be detected in the breath). It is not known which non-invasive test is more accurate for diagnosing a H. pylori infection, and the clinical significance of the levels obtained with these tests are not clear. Some drugs can affect H. pylori urease activity and give with the urea-based tests. An endoscopic biopsy is an invasive means to test for H. pylori infection. Low-level infections can be missed by biopsy, so multiple samples are recommended. The most accurate method (...) with a number of disorders of the . Testing for H. pylori is not routinely recommended. Testing is recommended if or low-grade gastric is present, after resection of early , for first-degree relatives with gastric cancer, and in certain cases of . Several methods of testing exist, including invasive and noninvasive testing methods. Noninvasive tests for H. pylori infection may be suitable and include tests, stool s, or the (in which the patient drinks —or -labelled , which the bacterium metabolizes

2012 Wikipedia

163. Irritable bowel syndrome

treatment has been ineffective. SIBO therapy [ ] Statistically significant reduction in IBS symptoms occurs following antibiotic therapy for . However, recent research has shown that the lactulose hydrogen breath test does not actually measure SIBO, and that SIBO is unlikely to be the cause of IBS. Psychological therapies [ ] There is low quality evidence from studies with poor methodological quality that psychological therapies can be effective in the treatment of IBS; however there are no significant (...) bowel disease, and malignancies) (to exclude fructose and lactose malabsorption) Misdiagnosis [ ] People with IBS are at increased risk of being given inappropriate surgeries such as , , and due to being misdiagnosed as other medical conditions. Some common examples of misdiagnosis include , coeliac disease, , (non- ). The American College of Gastroenterology recommends all people with symptoms of IBS be tested for coeliac disease. is also sometimes missed in people with diarrhea-predominant IBS

2012 Wikipedia

164. Flatulence

activated charcoal (unknown oral dose) reduced hydrogen sulfide levels by 71%. In combination with yucca schidigera, and zinc acetate, this was increased to an 86% reduction in hydrogen sulfide, although flatus volume and number was unchanged. An early study reported activated charcoal (unknown oral dose) prevented a large increase in the number of flatus events and increased breath hydrogen concentrations that normally occur following a gas-producing meal. Garments & external devices In 1998, Chester (...) , in normal subjects, even very high rates of gas infusion into the small intestine (30 ml/min) are tolerated without complaints of pain or bloating and harmlessly passed as flatus per rectum. Secondly, studies aiming to quantify the total volume of gas produced by patients with irritable bowel syndrome (some including gas emitted from the mouth by eructation) have consistently failed to demonstrate increased volumes compared to healthy subjects. The proportion of hydrogen produced may be increased

2012 Wikipedia

165. Biochemistry

carbohydrates are sugars. There are more carbohydrates on Earth than any other known type of biomolecule; they are used to store energy and , as well as play important roles in cell to and . The simplest type of carbohydrate is a , which among other properties contains carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, mostly in a ratio of 1:2:1 (generalized formula C n H 2 n O n , where n is at least 3). (C 6 H 12 O 6 ) is one of the most important carbohydrates; others include (C 6 H 12 O 6 ), the sugar commonly associated (...) is released. The reverse reaction in which the glycosidic bond of a disaccharide is broken into two monosaccharides is termed . The best-known disaccharide is or ordinary , which consists of a molecule and a molecule joined together. Another important disaccharide is found in milk, consisting of a glucose molecule and a molecule. Lactose may be hydrolysed by , and deficiency in this enzyme results in . When a few (around three to six) monosaccharides are joined, it is called an ( oligo- meaning "few

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2012 Wikipedia

166. Investigation of Alanine in Fructose Intolerance: A Dose Ranging Study

with unexplained GI symptoms is thought to be between 11-50%, when assessed with breath tests following administration of 25 grams of fructose in a 10% solution. Restriction of dietary fructose has been shown to improve symptoms in these patients to an extent. Currently, there are no therapeutic agents that improve intestinal fructose absorption and thereby decrease symptoms. Studies in the pediatric population have shown that fructose absorption in the small intestine is increased in the presence of glucose (...) or amino acids, especially alanine. Objective: The investigators' objective is to assess whether co-administration of an oral solution of L-alanine facilitates fructose absorption and decreases gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms associated with fructose malabsorption in subjects undergoing standard fructose breath test when compared to placebo. Methods and analysis: The investigators propose a randomized, double-blind study in 40 subjects with known fructose intolerance. After an overnight fast, each

2009 Clinical Trials

167. Non-Invasive Measurement of Gastrointestinal (GI) Motility in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

or at your home). Before eating or drinking anything a baseline measurement will be taken by breathing into the hydrogen meter. This will be just normal breathing. You will then drink a test meal consisting of 250 ml (approximately 1 cup) of a lactose (type of sugar) free supplement (For example Ensure) that has 20 grams of Lactulose added. If you have a peg tube then the supplement will be given through the tube. After 10 minutes you will again be asked to breath into the machine to measure the hydrogen (...) instrument that measures hydrogen gas in your breath. Data collection will start after you sign this consent form. The only procedures that would be above and beyond routine care are indicated below: In order to prepare for the study you will be asked to be off all medications that affects the GI motility for 24 hours. You will also be asked to fast overnight (starting midnight) the day before the test. After fasting overnight, the test will be performed in the morning (at the Neurology Outpatient Clinic

2008 Clinical Trials

168. Beneficial effects of oral tilactase on patients with hypolactasia. (PubMed)

levels (P < 0.005) than intolerants. After tilactase ingestion, integrated H(2) levels were decreased by 75% (low dose) and 87% (standard dose) in malabsorbers, and by 74% (low dose) and 88% (standard dose) in intolerants. In the latter group, total symptom score were decreased by 76% (low dose) and by 88% (standard dose) (P < 0.0001).A single oral administration of tilactase is highly effective in decreasing symptoms and hydrogen excretion of hypolactasia assessed by lactose H(2)-breath test (...) Beneficial effects of oral tilactase on patients with hypolactasia. A lactose-free diet is commonly prescribed to subjects with hypolactasia. We tested the effectiveness of a single ingestion of tilactase (a beta-D-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae) in adults with hypolactasia, previously assessed by lactose H(2)-breath test.After measurement of orocecal transit time (OCTT, by lactulose H(2)-breath test) and lactose H(2)-breath testing plus placebo, a total of 134 subjects were positive

2008 European journal of clinical investigation

169. Effect of Fructose on Colonic Microflora

in water twice a day Dietary Supplement: Fructose powder 30g in 250ml water twice a day No Intervention: No Intervention Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Statistically significant reduction in total sum breath hydrogen upon a 50g fructose challenge test. [ Time Frame: intervention for 2 weeks per participant ] Secondary Outcome Measures : A log 1 change in fecal bifidobacteria or lactobacilli species. [ Time Frame: stools retested 2 weeks apart ] Eligibility Criteria Go to Information (...) is achieved in both cases by short term regular consumption of the targeted sugar which is not digested by the host. The clinical definition of CA includes a measured change in breath hydrogen, reduction of clinical symptoms (Bloat, gas, cramps and at times diarrhea) and an associated increase of bacterial lactase(β-galactosidase. The putative mechanism is through bacterial action which results in enhanced metabolism or expanded bacterial population of specific genus and species of bacteria. The act of CA

2008 Clinical Trials

170. Correlation between symptoms developed after the oral ingestion of 50g lactose and results of hydrogen breath testing for lactose intolerance. (PubMed)

Correlation between symptoms developed after the oral ingestion of 50g lactose and results of hydrogen breath testing for lactose intolerance. Lactase deficiency is a common condition responsible for various abdominal symptoms. Lactose hydrogen breath test is currently the gold standard in diagnosing lactose intolerance.To assess sensitivity and specificity of symptoms developed after oral lactose challenge.Intensity of nausea, abdominal pain, borborygmi, bloating and diarrhoea was recorded (...) every 15 min up to 3 h after ingestion of 50 g lactose in patients with positive (i.e. breath H2-concentration > or =20 p.p.m. above baseline) and negative lactose hydrogen breath test.Between July 1999 and December 2005, 1127 patients (72% females) underwent lactose hydrogen breath test. A positive result was found in 376 (33%). Sensitivity of individual symptoms ranged from 39% (diarrhoea) to 70% (bloating) while specificity ranged from 69% (bloating) to 90% (diarrhoea). A positive lactose

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2008 Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

171. Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms. (PubMed)

Low-dose lactose in drugs neither increases breath hydrogen excretion nor causes gastrointestinal symptoms. Despite the reported tolerance to a low dose of lactose, many lactose malabsorbers follow a rigorous lactose-free diet also avoiding lactose-containing drugs. Up to now, only a few case reports have described the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms in lactose malabsorbers following the ingestion of these drugs. It has been suggested that capsules/tablets contain no more than 400 mg (...) of lactose.To evaluate breath H(2) excretion and intolerance symptoms after ingestion of a capsule containing 400 mg of lactose or placebo through a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, controlled study.Seventy-seven lactose maldigesters with intolerance underwent two H2 breath tests with both 400 mg of lactose and 400 mg of placebo. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurring in the 8 h following the ingestion of different substrates were evaluated by a visual-analogue scale.Ingestion of 400 mg of lactose did

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2008 Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

172. Flatulence and Wind

dioxide, hydrogen and methane are responsible for the main volume of intestinal gas and sulfur-containing gases for malodour. [ ] The volume and composition of gas depends both on diet and on colonic flora. [ , ] Peope with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are likely to produce a greater volume of gas than people who do not have IBS. IBS is also associated with a positive lactulose breath test (a test that assesses the amount of fermented gas generated by bacteria in the bowel) and an increase in gas (...) syndrome): [ ] FBC. ESR or CRP. Antibody testing for coeliac disease. Breath tests may be used to assess intestinal flora and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, usually in the context of research studies. [ ] Management Belching Explanation of normal physiology and reassurance may be sufficient. Investigate/treat and symptoms if relevant. [ ] Speech therapy or behavioural therapy may be used. [ , ] Flatulence Note that most of the research and literature on this topic relates to patients diagnosed

2008 Mentor

173. Chronic Diarrhoea in Adults

hydrogen breath test, jejunal aspirate and culture. Pancreatic: CT scan of pancreas. Faecal elastase or chymotrypsin. Further structural tests: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. History or findings suggestive of colonic or terminal ileal disease. Flexible sigmoidoscopy if aged under 45 years (the diagnostic yield is not different to colonoscopy in this group). If aged over 45 years, colonoscopy is preferred to barium enema. Terminal ileum (...) , tropical sprue, amyloid, intestinal lymphangiectasia. Bile acid malabsorption - eg, Crohn's disease affecting the terminal ileum, after ileal resection, cholecystectomy, coeliac disease, bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. Disaccharidase deficiency. Lactose intolerance. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth. Mesenteric ischaemia. Radiation enteritis. Lymphoma. Pancreatic: Chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic carcinoma. Cystic fibrosis. Endocrine: Hyperthyroidism. Diabetes mellitus (and other

2008 Mentor

174. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

. CRP. Coeliac screen. CA 125 for women with symptoms which could be ovarian cancer [ ] . Faecal calprotectin for those with symptoms which could be IBD [ ] . The following tests are NOT required to confirm IBS in those who meet the diagnostic criteria: TFTs. Ultrasound. Colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy/barium enema. Faecal occult blood. Faecal ova and parasite tests. Hydrogen breath tests. Referral criteria Refer patients in the event of diagnostic uncertainty, alarm symptoms, or severe resistant symptoms (...) in causing symptoms of IBS. Foods high in FODMAPs, such as apples, cherries, peaches, nectarines, artificial sweeteners, most lactose-containing foods, legumes, and many green vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and peas) may have fermentation and osmotic effects, increasing symptoms. Diets low in FODMAPs have therefore been advocated in helping symptoms. There is evidence to support this approach [ , , ] . Up to 86% of people with IBS are said to report an improvement in symptoms

2008 Mentor

175. breath tests in gastroenterology

breath tests in gastroenterology breath tests in gastroenterology - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search breath tests in gastroenterology Breath tests may be used to assess: malabsorption of specific carbohydrates e.g. lactose hydrogen breath test small intestine bacterial overgrowth e.g. glucose, 14C-xylose and 14C-glycocholate hydrogen breath tests fat absorption e.g. 14C-triolein breath test Isotopes are best

2010 GP Notebook

176. Statement on persistent diarrhea in the returned traveller

breath test can confirm a suspicion of lactose tolerance if the diagnosis is suspected and the clinical response to milk avoidance is inconclusive.) Specific therapy should be given using published guidelines ( or other sources) if likely pathogenic microorganisms are identified. A II Indications for GI endoscopy Among patients with persistent and substantial symptoms, GI endoscopy may contribute to management in the following circumstances. If sustained or progressive weight loss is a prominent (...) Stool examination for fecal leukocytes, lactoferrin, or even occult blood can also be helpful in identifying subjects with colitis of all etiologies . A II A complete blood count may be helpful if it reveals anemia, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, or eosinophilia. While the results are awaited, advise the patient to avoid all dairy or lactose-containing products; a trial period of 3 to 5 days is often diagnostic (C III). Clinical improvement may avoid the need for further investigations. (A hydrogen

2006 CPG Infobase

177. hydrogen breath test

. The test is most commonly used to diagnose lactose intolerance but may be used to detect rarer conditions such as hyposucrasia, and glucose-galactose malabsorption. Patients should avoid high roughage foods the evening before the test in an attempt to achieve a low basal breath hydrogen. Following an overnight fast, brushing the teeth will help eliminate oral fermentation of the substrate during the test. A basal sample is taken. Fifty grams of substrate in 200 ml of water are then swallowed. End (...) hydrogen breath test hydrogen breath test - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search hydrogen breath test The breath hydrogen test may be used to diagnose the malabsorption of specific carbohydrates. Sugars malabsorbed in the small bowel are metabolised by colonic bacteria with the production of hydrogen. The hydrogen diffuses rapidly across the colonic mucosa into the blood and can be measured in the breath

2010 GP Notebook

178. lactose breath test

lactose breath test lactose breath test - General Practice Notebook This site is intended for healthcare professionals General Practice Notebook | Medical search lactose breath test The breath hydrogen test may be used to diagnose the malabsorption of specific carbohydrates. Sugars malabsorbed in the small bowel are metabolised by colonic bacteria with the production of hydrogen. The hydrogen diffuses rapidly across the colonic mucosa into the blood and can be measured in the breath. The test (...) is most commonly used to diagnose lactose intolerance but may be used to detect rarer conditions such as hyposucrasia, and glucose-galactose malabsorption. Patients should avoid high roughage foods the evening before the test in an attempt to achieve a low basal breath hydrogen. Following an overnight fast, brushing the teeth will help eliminate oral fermentation of the substrate during the test. A basal sample is taken. Fifty grams of substrate in 200 ml of water are then swallowed. End-expiratory

2010 GP Notebook

179. Lactose Intolerance

a fast, and noting the rise in blood glucose, rather like a glucose tolerance test. A positive test is reproduction of symptoms and rise in serum glucose by <1.11 mmol/L, 60-120 minutes after ingestion. However, this rather higher dose than is presented in a normal meal has been criticised as representing an atypical situation. This has now been superseded by breath hydrogen tests. Breath hydrogen test - if carbohydrate is unabsorbed in the gut, it is fermented by bacteria in the large intestine (...) hydrogen during large bowel fermentation. Antibiotics may produce false negative results. For diagnosis of lactose intolerance, 0.5-1.0 g/kg to a maximum of 12-25 g of lactose is given and an increase greater than 20 ppm of hydrogen is diagnostic. Genetic tests are available but so far cannot cover all the genetic mutations that exist within different populations. If difficulty remains, a small intestinal mucosal biopsy can be obtained by endoscopy for direct assay of lactase activity as well

2008 Mentor

180. Circadin (melatonin)

in clinical efficacy section. The new dossier includes all the data that were submitted in the first MAA and additional data extracted from the new studies performed during 2003-2005. ©EMEA 2007 4/52 1. Quality aspects Introduction Circadin is presented in the form of prolonged-release tablets containing 2 mg of melatonin for oral administration. The excipients used in the formulation of Circadin are ammonio methacrylate copolymer Type B, calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate, lactose monohydrate (...) established. A single-dose, two-way crossover comparative pharmacokinetic and food interaction study together with the corresponding in vitro dissolution study, were performed to establish an in vitro-in vivo correlation. The data showed linear correlation (level A), confirming that the proposed dissolution test may be considered a reliable marker for the in vivo performance. • Adventitious Agents Lactose monohydrate was of animal origin. A declaration from the lactose supplier was provided stating

2007 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>