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Lactose Breath Hydrogen Test

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21. Semiquantitative assessment of breath hydrogen testing. (PubMed)

Semiquantitative assessment of breath hydrogen testing. A major use of breath hydrogen testing is to assess absorptive capacity for sugars to assist dietary design for management of gut symptoms. Qualitative reporting takes no account of the vigor of hydrogen response and provides little insight into degrees of malabsorption. This study aimed to describe a semiquantitative reporting method and to compare results with those reported qualitatively.In consecutive Caucasian patients with Crohn's (...) disease (n = 87), ulcerative colitis (59), functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) (162), and healthy controls (76), area under the curve was calculated for lactulose (15 g). This was compared with that for lactose (50 g) and fructose (35 g). Degree of malabsorption was categorized into arbitrary groups.Semiquantitative results for ≥ 30% (designated "convincing") malabsorption was most similar to those using a qualitative cutoff value of 20 ppm, but in 38% and 21% of patients, the classification

2013 Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology

22. Effects of A2 Milk on Gastrointestinal Function in Non-lactose Milk Intolerance

and 56 days ] Diagnostic of lactose intolerance by breath hydrogen concentration following ingestion of 25g lactose in 250 mL water [ Time Frame: screening visit, 14 days, 42 days and 56 days ] Diagnostic of lactose intolerance by breath methane concentration following ingestion of 25g lactose in 250 mL water [ Time Frame: screening visit, 14 days, 42 days and 56 days ] Self-reported change in gut transit time [ Time Frame: 14 days, 42 days and 56 days ] Monitoring of changes in psychological (...) Effects of A2 Milk on Gastrointestinal Function in Non-lactose Milk Intolerance Effects of A2 Milk on Gastrointestinal Function in Non-lactose Milk Intolerance - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2017 Clinical Trials

23. Predictors of response to a low-FODMAP diet in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and lactose or fructose intolerance. (PubMed)

mechanisms.Fructose and lactose breath tests were performed in FGID patients to determine intolerance (positive symptom score) and malabsorption (increased hydrogen or methane concentrations). Patients with fructose or lactose intolerance consumed a low-FODMAP diet and global adequate symptom relief was assessed after 6-8 weeks and correlated with pre-diet clinical symptoms and breath test results.A total of 81% of 584 patients completing the low-FODMAP diet achieved adequate relief, without significant (...) differences between FGID subgroups or types of intolerance. Univariate analysis yielded predictive factors in fructose intolerance (chronic diarrhoea and pruritus, peak methane concentrations and fullness during breath tests) and lactose intolerance (peak hydrogen and methane concentrations and flatulence during breath tests). Using multivariate analysis, symptom relief was independently and positively predicted in fructose intolerance by chronic diarrhoea [odds ratio (95% confidence intervals): 2.62

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2017 Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

24. Prevalence, cause and diagnosis of lactose intolerance in children aged 1-5 years: a systematic review of 1995-2015 literature.

between 0-17.9%. Prevalence of secondary LI was 0-19%. Hydrogen breath test was the most common method used to diagnose LI. None of the included studies reported age of onset of primary LI.There is limited recent evidence on the prevalence of LI in this age group. The low number of studies and wide range of methodologies used to diagnose LI means that comparison and interpretation, particularly of geographical trends, is compromised. Current understanding appears to rely on data generated in the 1960 (...) Prevalence, cause and diagnosis of lactose intolerance in children aged 1-5 years: a systematic review of 1995-2015 literature. To assess the prevalence, etiology, diagnosis of primary and secondary lactose intolerance (LI), including age of onset, among children 1-5 years of age. Suspected/perceived lactose intolerance can lead to dietary restrictions which may increase risk of future health issues.MEDLINE, CAB Abstract, and Embase were searched for articles published from January 1995-June

2017 Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition

25. Prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: data from a tertiary center in southern China (PubMed)

of this study was to investigate the prevalence of LI in IBS-D patients and asymptomatic healthy controls.Lactose malabsorption (LM) was diagnosed by a lactose hydrogen breath test (HBT) and was defined by peak breath H2 excretion over the baseline level of ≥ 20 ppm. LI-related symptoms were monitored for 8 h following lactose administration. LI was defined in LM patients with positive symptoms during the observation time. Patients with IBS-D were additionally asked if they were intolerant to milk.A total (...) Prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: data from a tertiary center in southern China Symptoms associated with lactose intolerance (LI) and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) are almost the same. These disease entities are difficult to differentiate clinically. In practice, differential diagnosis depends on self-reported patient milk intolerance. However, there is limited data on the prevalence of LI in China. The aim

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2017 Journal of health, population, and nutrition

26. Country, regional, and global estimates for lactose malabsorption in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

, and to assess the variation between different testing methods.Studies reporting on prevalence of lactose malabsorption and lactase persistence were identified by searching MEDLINE and Embase from database inception to Nov 2, 2016. We evaluated studies presenting lactose malabsorption or lactase persistence prevalence data in adults and children aged 10 years or older, including cross-sectional and prospective studies, using genotyping, hydrogen breath tests, lactose tolerance tests, and other testing (...) articles were included (primary sources); data for 144 additional study populations from 59 articles were obtained from review articles, because full-text primary articles could not be obtained (secondary sources). Of the 450 study populations included, 231 were assessed by genotyping, 83 by hydrogen breath tests, 101 by lactose tolerance tests, and 35 by other methods or methods that were not described sufficiently. The studies included 62 910 participants from 89 countries (covering 84

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2017 The lancet. Gastroenterology & hepatology

27. Breath testing for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: maximizing test accuracy. (PubMed)

providing greater testing accuracy. Lactose, fructose, and sorbitol should not be used as substrates in the assessment of suspected SIBO. The measurement of methane in addition to hydrogen can increase the sensitivity of breath testing for SIBO. Diagnostic accuracy of hydrogen breath testing in SIBO can be maximized by careful patient selection for testing, proper test preparation, and standardization of test performance as well as test interpretation. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published (...) for the diagnosis of SIBO. The current gold standard, small-bowel aspiration and quantitative culture, is limited by its high cost, invasive nature, lack of standardization, sampling error, and need for dedicated infrastructure. Although not without shortcomings, hydrogen breath testing provides the simplest noninvasive and widely available diagnostic modality for suspected SIBO. Carbohydrates such as lactulose and glucose are the most widely used substrates in hydrogen breath testing, with glucose arguably

2014 Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

28. Chronic norovirus infection as a risk factor for secondary lactose maldigestion in renal transplant recipients: a prospective parallel cohort pilot study. (PubMed)

be implicated.Adult renal transplant recipients who had symptomatic chronic norovirus infection with diarrhea were asked to participate in this prospective parallel cohort study. Renal transplant recipients with otherwise unexplainable chronic diarrhea but absent infection served as control group. In both groups, a lactose hydrogen breath test and a lactose tolerance test were performed after exclusion of primary LM by a negative lactase gene test.Of approximately 800 patients in the cohort of renal transplant (...) recipients at our institution, 15 subjects were included in the present study. Of these, 7 had chronic symptomatic norovirus infection with diarrhea (noro group), and 8 had diarrhea in the absence of norovirus (control group). Lactose hydrogen breath test and lactose tolerance test were positive in all 7 patients (100%) in the noro group, whereas only 1 (12.5%) of 8 patients in the control group had a positive test. Thus, secondary LM was highly prevalent in the noro compared with the control group

2016 Transplantation

29. ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF EXOGENOUS LACTASE IN TABLETS FOR PATIENTS DIAGNOSED WITH LACTOSE INTOLERANCE DUE TO PRIMARY HYPOLACTASIA. (PubMed)

with proven effectiveness in patients with lactose intolerance.Multicentre, randomized, parallel group, single-blind, comparative non-inferiority study. One hundred twenty-nine (129) adult lactose intolerance patients with hydrogen breath test results consistent with a diagnosis of hypolactasia were randomly assigned to receive the experimental product (Perlatte(r) - Eurofarma Laboratórios S.A.) or the reference product (Lactaid(r) - McNeilNutritionals, USA) orally (one tablet, three times per day) for 42 (...) consecutive days.Data from 128 patients who actually received the studied treatments were analysed (66 were treated with the experimental product and 62 with the reference product). The two groups presented with similar baseline clinical and demographic data. Mean exhaled hydrogen concentration tested at 90 minutes after the last treatment (Day 42) was significantly lower in the experimental product treated group (17±18 ppm versus 34±47 ppm) in the per protocol population. The difference between the means

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2016 Arquivos de gastroenterologia Controlled trial quality: predicted high

30. Lactose Intolerance and Health

in the colon. Lactose malabsorption can be diagnosed by having individuals ingest a standard dose of lactose after fasting and finding elevated levels of breath hydrogen, which is produced by bacterial fermentation of undigested lactose in the colon. Other diagnostic tools include measuring the lactase activity in an intestinal biopsy sample or genetic testing for the common polymorphism that is linked to lactase nonpersistence. The demonstration of lactose malabsorption does not necessarily indicate (...) frequent across all ethnic groups than is lactose malabsorption determined by breath hydrogen tests or lactase nonpersistence determined by biopsy or genetic testing. Second, lactose intolerance, lactose malabsorption, and lactase nonpersistence vary across racial and ethnic groups with the lowest reported occurrence in European Americans and higher although variable occurrence in African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans. The systematic evidence review notes

2010 NIH Consensus Statements

31. Fructose Breath-testing in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

by (Responsible Party): C. Wilder-Smith, Brain-Gut Research Group Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Background: Breath testing for food intolerances is becoming routine in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Both FGID and saccharide intolerances (FODMAPs: fermentable oligo-, di-, polysaccharide and polyols, e.g. lactose, fructose, sorbitol) are common (>10% of any given population) and often respond to dietary modification. The breath tests are based (...) studied as underlying causes for intolerance symptoms in fructose intolerant patients with FGID. Aim: To investigate the psychological component and the short-term metabolic effects of fructose breath testing in patients referred for evaluation of FGID using placebo. Additionally, to assess baseline predictors for a positive breath test result. Methods: Fructose intolerance (defined by a positive symptom index) and malabsorption (defined by increased breath hydrogen/methane concentrations

2015 Clinical Trials

32. Phase IV noninferiority controlled randomized trial to evaluate the impact on diagnostic thinking and patient management and the test-retest reproducibility of the Gaxilose test for hypolactasia diagnosis. (PubMed)

Phase IV noninferiority controlled randomized trial to evaluate the impact on diagnostic thinking and patient management and the test-retest reproducibility of the Gaxilose test for hypolactasia diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of the Gaxilose test (GT) for hypolactasia diagnosis has already been proved. The objectives of this clinical trial were to demonstrate the noninferiority of the GT compared to the hydrogen breath test (HBT) on the impact on diagnostic thinking and patient management (...) , to evaluate the GT reproducibility with urine accumulated from 0 to 4 hours and from 0 to 5 hours and to assess test safety.We conducted a randomized, parallel, noninferiority clinical trial. Patients with clinical symptoms suggestive of lactose intolerance were screened for inclusion and randomly assigned to the GT arm or the HBT arm of the study. The impact on diagnostic thinking and patient management was analyzed with pretest and posttest questionnaires in which the investigators indicated

2018 Medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

33. Fructose and lactose intolerance and malabsorption testing: the relationship with symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (PubMed)

and the outcome of dietary intervention.Fructose and lactose intolerance (defined by positive symptom index) and malabsorption (defined by increased hydrogen/methane) were determined in 1372 FGID patients in a single centre using breath testing. Results were correlated with clinical symptoms in different FGID Rome III subgroups. The effectiveness of a targeted saccharide-reduced diet was assessed after 6-8 weeks.Intolerance prevalence across all FGIDs was 60% to fructose, 51% to lactose and 33% to both (...) , irrespective of malabsorption.Fructose and lactose intolerances are common in FGID and associated with increased non-GI symptoms, but not with specific FGID subtypes. Symptoms experienced during breath testing, but not malabsorption, correlate with FGID symptoms. Effective symptom relief with dietary adaptation is not associated with malabsorption. Mechanisms relating to the generation of GI and non-GI symptoms due to lactose and fructose in FGID need to be explored further.© 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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2013 Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

34. Association of lactose sensitivity with inflammatory bowel disease - demonstrated by analysis of genetic polymorphism, breath gases and symptoms. (PubMed)

Association of lactose sensitivity with inflammatory bowel disease - demonstrated by analysis of genetic polymorphism, breath gases and symptoms. Sensitivity to lactose has been reported in Crohn's disease, but its true role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. The genetic marker CC₁₃₉₁₀, on chromosome2, with measurement of breath hydrogen and methane, and gut and systemic symptoms, are now the most comprehensive tests for evaluating sensitivity to lactose.To investigate (...) , for the first time, the prevalence of lactose sensitivity in IBD, using the most comprehensive tests for diagnosing this condition.Prevalence of CC₁₃₉₁₀ genotype was investigated using RT-PCR in 165 patients (Crohn's disease = 70, ulcerative colitis = 95), and 30 healthy volunteers. Genotype was correlated with breath hydrogen and methane up to 6 h after 50 g of oral lactose, all symptoms being recorded for up to 48 h. Critically, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were selected with no record

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2011 Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

35. Lactose and fructose malabsorption in children with recurrent abdominal pain: results of double-blinded testing. (PubMed)

Lactose and fructose malabsorption in children with recurrent abdominal pain: results of double-blinded testing. To investigate malabsorption of lactose and fructose as causes of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP).In 220 children (128 girls, mean age 8,8 [4.1-16.0] years) with RAP, hydrogen breath tests (H(2) BT; abnormal if ΔH(2) > 30 ppm) were performed with lactose and fructose. Disappearance of RAP with elimination, recurrence with provocation and disappearance with re-elimination, followed (...) by a 6-month pain-free follow-up, were considered indicative of a causal relation with RAP. For definite proof, a double-blinded placebo-controlled (DBPC) provocation was performed.Malabsorption of lactose was found in 57 of 210, of fructose in 79 of 121 patients. Pain disappeared upon elimination in 24/38 patients with lactose malabsorption, and in 32/49 with fructose malabsorption. Open provocation with lactose and fructose was positive in 7/23 and 13/31 patients. DBPC provocation in 6/7 and 8/13

2012 Acta paediatrica Controlled trial quality: uncertain

36. Evaluation of LacTEST for the Diagnosis of Hypolactasia in Adults and Elderly Patients Presenting With Clinical Symptoms of Lactose Intolerance

diagnostic test performed. Drug: gaxilose After gaxilose administration, urine collection, cuantification (firstly from 0 to 4 hours, and total urine from 0 to 5 hours), and xilose cuantification afterwards. Other Name: LacTEST Active Comparator: Hydrogen Breath Test 25 to 50 g of lactose po, once, per diagnostic test performed. Dietary Supplement: lactose After lactose administration, expired hydrogen measurement at pre-specified intervals. Other Name: Hydrogen Breath Test (HBT) Outcome Measures Go (...) with Diabetes Mellitus. Patients who are participating or have participated in any clinical trial within the 3 months previous to their inclusion in the study. Patients who are drug abuse consumers. Patients under treatment with antibiotics, sulphamides and antiparasitics, who cannot suspend the treatments 7 days prior to the performance of the hydrogen breath test. Patients with any recognized and already existing disorder that might interfere with the any of the lactose intolerance diagnosis tests

2015 Clinical Trials

37. β-galactosidase Producing Probiotic Strains to Improve Lactose Digestion

: each subject will be administered 3 products out of 4 (positive control, probiotic Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus, probiotic Bifidobacterium (B.) longum, negative control) in a random order on 3 different days separated by a washout period of at least one week, and maximum 2 weeks between each challenge. The total sample size is 42 enrolled subjects/37 completed Patients will be males and females aged between 20 and 65 years with positive hydrogen breath test. Study Design Go to Layout table (...) lactose + probiotic S. thermophilus Active Comparator: Positive control with B. longum UHT milk containing 18 g total lactose+ B. longum Other: Probiotic B. longum 200ml milk containing 18g lactose + probiotic B. longum Placebo Comparator: Negative control Lactose free milk Other: Negative control 200 ml of UHT Lactose free milk Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Lactose malabsorption as represented by the increase of exhaled hydrogen compared to baseline measured by the hydrogen Breath

2015 Clinical Trials

38. Acid Lactase in Combination With Yoghurt Bacteria for Improvement of Lactose Digestion in Lactose Malabsorbers

Placebo Comparator: Placebo Dietary Supplement: Placebo Capsules containing di-calcium-phosphate Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Increase in hydrogen concentration in the breath (H2-exhalation breath test) [ Time Frame: Every 20 minutes for 4 hours ] Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study (...) Acid Lactase in Combination With Yoghurt Bacteria for Improvement of Lactose Digestion in Lactose Malabsorbers Acid Lactase in Combination With Yoghurt Bacteria for Improvement of Lactose Digestion in Lactose Malabsorbers - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved

2012 Clinical Trials

39. Tests for lactose malabsorption in adults. (PubMed)

Tests for lactose malabsorption in adults. 1139216 1975 10 11 2018 11 13 0007-1447 2 5973 1975 Jun 28 British medical journal Br Med J Tests for lactose malabsorption in adults. 751 Metz G G Blendis L M LM Jenkins D J DJ eng Letter England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 7YNJ3PO35Z Hydrogen J2B2A4N98G Lactose AIM IM Adult Breath Tests Chromatography, Gas Humans Hydrogen analysis Intestinal Absorption Lactose metabolism Malabsorption Syndromes diagnosis 1975 6 28 1975 6 28 0 1 1975 6 28 0 0 ppublish

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1975 British medical journal

40. Fructose and Lactose Intolerance and Malabsorption in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

will be investigated using metabolomic analysis of plasma and urine by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS). Methods: Fructose and lactose intolerance (defined by positive symptom index) and malabsorption (defined by increased hydrogen/methane) will be determined in successive male and female FGID patients in a single center using breath-testing. Symptoms will be recorded using standardised questionnaires and the Rome III criteria. The prevalence of the intolerances in the different FGID (...) are common (>10% of any given population). Dietary modification based on intolerance diagnostics could provide an effective treatment for FGID, which are otherwise difficult to treat. Aim: To investigate the prevalence and interrelationships of fructose and lactose intolerance (symptom induction) and malabsorption (breath test gas production) and their association with clinical GI as well as non-GI symptoms in FGID and the outcome of standard dietary intervention. Mechanisms related to symptom genesis

2014 Clinical Trials

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