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Lactose Breath Hydrogen Test

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221. [Influence of live flora on lactose digestion in male adult lactose-malabsorbers after dairy products intake]. (PubMed)

[Influence of live flora on lactose digestion in male adult lactose-malabsorbers after dairy products intake]. To evaluate the effect of live flora on lactose absorption in male adult lactose-malabsorbers.After giving consents, 45 health male adult volunteers were challenged with 20 g lactose in 200 ml water in the morning without breakfast. The expired samples of breath were collected at every 30 min point in 3 hours. 24 persons were chosen as subjects (lactose-malabsorbers) when their expired (...) H2 of any time point was 30 micromol/mol more than the baseline, and divided into 3 groups randomly. The test dairy were yogurt (Y) and heat-treated yogurt (HY), and acidified gelled milk (M), all containing 20 g lactose. The study was double blind, randomized and 3 x 3 latin square design. Three group subjects ingested the 3 different dairy products in 3 different days. The washout time was 7 days. After drinking each dairy in the morning without breakfast, the expired samples at every 30 min

2004 Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

222. Lactose malabsorption in Greek adults: correlation of small bowel transit time with the severity of lactose intolerance. (PubMed)

breath hydrogen concentration was inversely related to small bowel transit time (r = 0.63, 6 = 6.854, p less than 0.001) and the severity of symptoms decreased with increasing small bowel transit time. Lactose malabsorbers with diarrhoea during the lactose tolerance test had a small bowel transit time of 51 +/- 22 minutes (x +/- SD; n = 90) which was significantly shorter than the small bowel transit time of patients with colicky pain, flatulence, and abdominal distension (74 +/- 30, n = 53; p less (...) Lactose malabsorption in Greek adults: correlation of small bowel transit time with the severity of lactose intolerance. Using breath hydrogen analysis after 139 mmol (50 g) oral lactose load, we investigated the prevalence of lactose malabsorption in 200 Greek adults and examined the relationship between symptoms and small bowel transit time. One hundred and fifty subjects had increased breath hydrogen concentrations (greater than 20 ppm) after the lactose load. In these individuals peak

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1982 Gut

223. How much lactose is low lactose? (PubMed)

How much lactose is low lactose? To test the hypothesis that complete elimination of lactose is not necessary to ensure tolerance by lactose maldigesters.Double-blind, randomized protocol in which challenge doses of 0, 2, 6, 12, and 20 g lactose in water were fed to subjects after a 12-hour fast.13 healthy, free-living adults who were lactose maldigesters.Breath hydrogen production (a measure of maldigestion) and symptom response to each challenge dose.Analysis of variance was done to determine (...) overall differences in mean hydrogen gas production (peak and sum of hours 1 through 8). Friedman's test was used to determine overall differences in the mean ranks for each symptom. Fisher's least significant difference test was used for multiple comparisons for hydrogen and symptom and data.Hydrogen production after consumption of the 0- and 2-g lactose doses was not significantly different. Hydrogen production increased with the 6-g dose. Intensity of abdominal pain increased when the dose

1996 Journal of the American Dietetic Association Controlled trial quality: uncertain

224. Digestion and tolerance of lactose from yoghurt and different semi-solid fermented dairy products containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacteria in lactose maldigesters--is bacterial lactase important? (PubMed)

Digestion and tolerance of lactose from yoghurt and different semi-solid fermented dairy products containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacteria in lactose maldigesters--is bacterial lactase important? To compare the digestibility and tolerance of lactose from three semi-solid fermented dairy products with the same amount of lactose but different lactase contents and bacterial cultures in lactase deficient adults.Measurement of breath hydrogen (H2) concentration and of clinical (...) symptoms after consumption of the test meals.Metabolic ward for healthy volunteers, INSERM U290, Hôpital St. Lazare, Paris.Fifteen lactase-deficient healthy adult volunteers (20-45 y) started the study. One subject became a non-H2-producer during the study; therefore the results of 14 subjects are presented.Each subject consumed, on four different days and in random order, after a 12 h fast, three semisolid test meals containing 18 g of lactose, and a 10 g dose of lactulose which allowed calculation

1996 European journal of clinical nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

225. Effects of milk viscosity on gastric emptying and lactose intolerance in lactose maldigesters. (PubMed)

obtained by adding varying proportions of rice starch and maltodextrin to a basic milk formula. A combined [13C]glycine-hydrogen breath test was used to measure gastric emptying and lactose digestion simultaneously. Participants reported their gastrointestinal symptoms by using a four-grade scale. Mean (+/- SEM) gastric-emptying half times were 78 +/- 5.7 min for low-viscosity milk (30 mPa.s), 86 +/- 5.0 min for moderate-viscosity milk (80 mPa.s), and 78 +/- 4.5 min for high-viscosity milk (1.9.10(3 (...) ) mPa.s). Mean orocecal transit times (180 +/- 24, 163 +/- 23, and 180 +/- 24 min, respectively) were not significantly different. There were no milk-dependent differences in breath-hydrogen excretion or in the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms. The milks were well tolerated; > 50% of the subjects reported nondisturbing symptoms or none. We conclude that gastric emptying, orocecal transit time, and lactose digestion and tolerance were not affected by altering milk viscosity. This may have been due

1997 The American journal of clinical nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

226. Breath hydrogen excretion in infants with colic. (PubMed)

Breath hydrogen excretion in infants with colic. 2317079 1990 04 16 2018 11 13 1468-2044 65 2 1990 Feb Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Breath hydrogen excretion in infants with colic. 248 Miller J J JJ Brand J C JC McVeagh P P eng Comment Letter England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 7YNJ3PO35Z Hydrogen J2B2A4N98G Lactose AIM IM Arch Dis Child. 1989 Aug;64(8):1208 2782941 Breath Tests Colic metabolism Humans Hydrogen analysis Infant Lactose metabolism 1990 2 1 1990 2 1 0 1

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1990 Archives of Disease in Childhood

227. Inulin is an ideal substrate for a hydrogen breath test to measure the orocaecal transit time. (PubMed)

Inulin is an ideal substrate for a hydrogen breath test to measure the orocaecal transit time. A better substrate is needed for a hydrogen breath test to measure the orocaecal transit time. The currently used substrate, lactulose, accelerates the orocaecal transit time by increasing the osmolality of the gut contents. The recently developed lactose 13C-ureide breath test is reliable, but a hydrogen breath test is preferred, as it allows the simultaneous investigation of the digestion (...) ; interquartile range, 300-383 min) and lactose 13C-ureide (353 min; interquartile range, 285-375 min) (r=0.85; P<0.001). The administration of 5 or 10 g Raftilin HP had no influence on the orocaecal transit time, whereas lactulose significantly shortened the orocaecal transit time. Neither inulin nor lactulose had a significant influence on gastric emptying or protein or lipid assimilation.Raftilin HP is an ideal substrate for a hydrogen breath test to measure the orocaecal transit time.

2003 Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

228. Temperature of a test solution influences abdominal symptoms in lactose tolerance tests. (PubMed)

degrees C (cold) and 55-58 degrees C (hot). Gastrointestinal symptoms and indicators measuring lactose absorption were recorded. Abdominal pain was noticeably increased by the modification of temperature. The cold solution reduced flatulence and abdominal bloating, whereas the hot solution increased bloating and borborygmi. Breath hydrogen excretion tended to be augmented and retarded after cold solution. The temperature of the solution used in a lactose tolerance test affects the gastrointestinal (...) Temperature of a test solution influences abdominal symptoms in lactose tolerance tests. In lactose maldigesters, retarding gastric emptying (food/pharmaceuticals) improves tolerance to lactose. The role of temperature of test solution on the indicators of lactose intolerance was studied. After an overnight fast, 10 lactose maldigesters ingested, in three sessions, 50 g lactose in a randomized cross-over trial. The solutions were at temperatures of 20-21 degrees C (room temperature), 2-3

2000 Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

229. Abnormal breath tests to lactose, fructose and sorbitol in irritable bowel syndrome may be explained by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. (PubMed)

Abnormal breath tests to lactose, fructose and sorbitol in irritable bowel syndrome may be explained by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sugar malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome. The lactulose breath test is a reliable and non-invasive test for the diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The lactose, fructose and sorbitol hydrogen breath tests are widely used to detect specific sugar (...) malabsorption.To assess the extent to which small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may influence the results of hydrogen sugar breath tests in irritable bowel syndrome patients.We enrolled 98 consecutive irritable bowel syndrome patients. All subjects underwent hydrogen lactulose, lactose, fructose and sorbitol hydrogen breath tests. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth patients were treated with 1-week course of antibiotics. All tests were repeated 1 month after the end of therapy.A positive lactulose breath

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2005 Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

230. Hydrogen breath test in gastroenteritis. (PubMed)

Hydrogen breath test in gastroenteritis. 7103553 1982 09 24 2018 11 13 1468-2044 57 7 1982 Jul Archives of disease in childhood Arch. Dis. Child. Hydrogen breath test in gastroenteritis. 561-2 Robb T A TA Davidson G P GP eng Letter England Arch Dis Child 0372434 0003-9888 7YNJ3PO35Z Hydrogen AIM IM Breath Tests Gastroenteritis diagnosis Humans Hydrogen analysis Lactose Intolerance diagnosis 1982 7 1 1982 7 1 0 1 1982 7 1 0 0 ppublish 7103553 PMC1627680 Lancet. 1976 Jan 17;1(7951):119-20 54637

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1982 Archives of Disease in Childhood

231. Hydrogen breath test in schoolchildren. (PubMed)

Hydrogen breath test in schoolchildren. The frequency of negative hydrogen breath tests due to colonic bacterial flora which are unable to produce hydrogen was determined after oral lactulose challenge in 98 healthy Dutch schoolchildren. There was a negative result in 9.2%. The probability of a false normal lactose breath test (1:77) was calculated from these results together with those from a separate group of children with lactose malabsorption (also determined by hydrogen breath test (...) ). A study of siblings and mothers of subjects with a negative breath test did not show familial clustering of this condition. Faecal incubation tests with various sugars showed an increase in breath hydrogen greater than 100 parts per million in those with a positive breath test while subjects with a negative breath test also had a negative faecal incubation test. The frequency of a false negative hydrogen breath test was higher than previously reported, but this does not affect the superiority

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1985 Archives of Disease in Childhood

232. Acidic colonic microclimate--possible reason for false negative hydrogen breath tests. (PubMed)

tests after MgSO4 pretreatment. MgSO4 pretreatment neither resulted in false positive lactose hydrogen breath tests in five lactose tolerant hydrogen producers, nor increased the hydrogen exhalation in five additional hydrogen producing controls after ingestion of lactulose. The results of these studies confirm that hydrogen production from lactulose decreases when the colonic pH is lower (lactulose pretreatment), and increases when colonic pH is higher (MgSO4 pretreatment). In low hydrogen (...) Acidic colonic microclimate--possible reason for false negative hydrogen breath tests. About 5% of normal subjects fail to produce increased hydrogen breath concentration after ingestion of the non-digestible carbohydrate lactulose (low hydrogen producers). The existence of low hydrogen producers limits the diagnostic use of hydrogen (H2) breath tests. We studied the effects of lactulose and of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) pretreatment on stool-pH and on hydrogen exhalation after oral loading

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1988 Gut

233. Breath hydrogen test and stools characteristics after ingestion of milk and yogurt in malnourished children with chronic diarrhoea and lactase deficiency. (PubMed)

Breath hydrogen test and stools characteristics after ingestion of milk and yogurt in malnourished children with chronic diarrhoea and lactase deficiency. 3669132 1987 11 27 2018 05 31 0142-6338 33 4 1987 08 Journal of tropical pediatrics J. Trop. Pediatr. Breath hydrogen test and stools characteristics after ingestion of milk and yogurt in malnourished children with chronic diarrhoea and lactase deficiency. 177-80 10.1093/tropej/33.4.177 Dewit O O Boudraa G G Touhami M M Desjeux J F JF eng (...) Clinical Trial Comparative Study Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial England J Trop Pediatr 8010948 0142-6338 IM Animals Breath Tests Child, Preschool Dairy Products Diarrhea, Infantile metabolism Feces analysis Humans Infant Intestinal Absorption Lactose Intolerance metabolism Male Milk Nutrition Disorders metabolism Yogurt 1987 8 1 2000 5 12 9 0 1987 8 1 0 0 ppublish 3669132 10.1093/tropej/33.4.177

1987 Journal of tropical pediatrics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

234. Effect of a single dose of lactase on symptoms and expired hydrogen after lactose challenge in lactose-intolerant subjects. (PubMed)

Effect of a single dose of lactase on symptoms and expired hydrogen after lactose challenge in lactose-intolerant subjects. The effect of a single dose or oral lactase on symptoms, breath hydrogen concentration, and glucose absorption in lactose-intolerant subjects challenged with lactose was studied. Volunteers underwent a lactose challenge test; those whose breath hydrogen concentrations increased 20 ppm or more and who met other criteria were admitted as subjects. After fasting, the subjects (...) were given three chewable lactase tablets (total lactase dose, 9900 FCC units) or placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind, crossover manner. The subjects also consumed 8 oz of whole milk in which 37.5 g of lactose powder was dissolved (total lactose content, 50 g). The washout period between lactose challenges was at least one week. Breath hydrogen and plasma glucose concentrations were measured before and at intervals after the challenges, and the subjects completed symptom-evaluation

1992 Clinical pharmacy Controlled trial quality: uncertain

235. Breath testing to evaluate lactose intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome correlates with lactulose testing and may not reflect true lactose malabsorption. (PubMed)

lactose breath test and LTT (kappa = 0.29). However, lactose breath test hydrogen levels >166 ppm were universally predictive of abnormal LTT. Finally, a significant correlation was seen between the hydrogen production on lactose and lactulose breath test (r = 0.56, p = 0.01).Lactose breath testing in IBS subjects does not seem to reflect malabsorption; it may be an indicator of abnormal lactulose breath test, suggesting bacterial overgrowth. (...) Breath testing to evaluate lactose intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome correlates with lactulose testing and may not reflect true lactose malabsorption. An increased prevalence of lactose intolerance is seen in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Recently, we demonstrated a high prevalence of abnormal lactulose breath test results in IBS suggesting bacterial overgrowth. Because symptoms of lactose intolerance result from bacterial fermentation, the purpose of this study was to determine whether

2003 American Journal of Gastroenterology

236. What is the hydrogen breath test used for? Does it have a use in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance? What is its sensitivity and specificity? Does goat’s milk contain lactose?

What is the hydrogen breath test used for? Does it have a use in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance? What is its sensitivity and specificity? Does goat’s milk contain lactose? What is the hydrogen breath test used for? Does it have a use in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance? What is its sensitivity and specificity? Does goat’s milk contain lactose? - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY (...) test used for? Does it have a use in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance? What is its sensitivity and specificity? Does goat’s milk contain lactose? Gp notebook (1) notes: “The breath hydrogen test may be used to diagnose the malabsorption of specific carbohydrates. Sugars malabsorbed in the small bowel are metabolised by colonic bacteria with the production of hydrogen. The hydrogen diffuses rapidly across the colonic mucosa into the blood and can be measured in the breath. The test is most

2004 TRIP Answers

237. Chronic consumption of fresh but not heated yogurt improves breath-hydrogen status and short-chain fatty acid profiles: a controlled study in healthy men with or without lactose maldigestion. (PubMed)

and Streptococcus thermophilus) on plasma glucose, insulin, triacylglycerols, cholesterol, fatty acids, and short-chain fatty acids.Two groups of 12 healthy men with or without lactose malabsorption were selected with use of a breath-hydrogen test after a 30-g lactose load. Subjects were randomly assigned in a crossover design to 500 g/d of either fresh or heated yogurt for 2 periods of 15 d each, separated by a 15-d washout interval.Chronic consumption of fresh or heated yogurt had no detrimental effects (...) Chronic consumption of fresh but not heated yogurt improves breath-hydrogen status and short-chain fatty acid profiles: a controlled study in healthy men with or without lactose maldigestion. Ingestion of fermented dairy products induces changes in the equilibrium and metabolism of the intestinal microflora and may thus have beneficial effects on the host.We compared the effects of chronic consumption of yogurt with (fresh) or without (heated) live bacterial cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus

2000 The American journal of clinical nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

238. Hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption: The importance of timing and the number of breath samples (PubMed)

Hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption: The importance of timing and the number of breath samples The hydrogen breath test (H(2)BT) is the most widely used procedure in the diagnostic workup of lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance.To establish whether a simplified two- or three-sample test may reduce time, costs and staff resources without reducing the sensitivity of the procedure.Data from 1,112 patients (292 men, 820 women) with a positive 4 h, nine-sample H(2)BT (...) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were stratified according to the degree of lactose malabsorption, the occurrence and type of symptoms. Loss of sensitivity in the procedure was evaluated taking into account two-sample tests (0 min and 120 min or 0 min and 210 min) or three-sample tests (0 min, 120 min and 180 min or 0 min, 120 min and 210 min).Using a two-sample test (0 min and 120 min or 0 min and 210 min) the false-negative rate was 33.4% and 22.7%, respectively. With a three-sample test

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2006 Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology

239. Effect of fiber on breath hydrogen response and symptoms after oral lactose in lactose malabsorbers. (PubMed)

Effect of fiber on breath hydrogen response and symptoms after oral lactose in lactose malabsorbers. The effect of ingesting cellulose, pectin, and psyllium with orally administered lactose in water or milk was tested in six lactose malabsorbers. Breath hydrogen tests were used to evaluate lactose malabsorption and mouth-to-cecum transit times. Addition of psyllium significantly reduced the breath hydrogen response, and symptoms in each subject; whereas, less diminution of expired hydrogen

1982 The American journal of clinical nutrition Controlled trial quality: uncertain

240. Lactose malabsorption during gastroenteritis, assessed by the hydrogen breath test. (PubMed)

Lactose malabsorption during gastroenteritis, assessed by the hydrogen breath test. Thirty-eight infants and young children with gastroenteritis were investigated for lactose malabsorption. Each of them was given an oral lactose load of either 0.5 g/kg or 2 g/kg after which breath hydrogen excretion was measured, and each was observed to see if he had clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance. Only one patient, given 2 g/kg lactose, had clinical intolerance. His breath hydrogen excretion however (...) was negative. Three of 18 patients given 0.5 g/kg lactose had positive breath hydrogen tests. None of these was symptomatic. Lactose intolerance in gastroenteritis was rare in our study, and the hydrogen breath test was not an appropriate technique for detecting it.

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1981 Archives of Disease in Childhood

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