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Knee Exam

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161. Study for the Treatment of Knee Chondral and Osteochondral Lesions

Description: Post-operative MRI exams will be carried out for each patient during the follow-up visit, at 6, 12 and 24 months post-op., and centrally blind evaluated by two senior radiologists. STATISTICS The study has been designed to demonstrate the superiority of MaioRegen® compared to marrow stimulation techniques. On the basis of previous evidence and, assuming a minimum difference in the modification of the IKDC Subjective Knee Evaluation Score between MaioRegen® and the control therapy, the sample (...) Study for the Treatment of Knee Chondral and Osteochondral Lesions Study for the Treatment of Knee Chondral and Osteochondral Lesions - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study for the Treatment

2011 Clinical Trials

162. Milnacipran for Chronic Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis

Milnacipran for Chronic Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis Milnacipran for Chronic Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Milnacipran for Chronic Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis (...) Party): Dr. Norman Harden, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The patients are asked to take part in this study because you have chronic pain as a result of knee osteoarthritis. This study is done to investigate the pain relieving effects of the study drug Savella (milnacipran HCl) for people who experience chronic osteoarthritis pain. The purpose of this research is to look at how the study drug can be used to benefit people who experience osteoarthritis

2011 Clinical Trials

163. Adductor-Canal-Blockade Versus the Femoral Nerve Block Effect on Muscle Strength, Pain and Mobilization After Total Knee Replacement

Adductor-Canal-Blockade Versus the Femoral Nerve Block Effect on Muscle Strength, Pain and Mobilization After Total Knee Replacement Adductor-Canal-Blockade Versus the Femoral Nerve Block Effect on Muscle Strength, Pain and Mobilization After Total Knee Replacement - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You (...) have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Adductor-Canal-Blockade Versus the Femoral Nerve Block Effect on Muscle Strength, Pain and Mobilization After Total Knee Replacement The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01470391

2011 Clinical Trials

164. Gender Solutions Natural Knee Post-Market Study

severe knee pain and disability who meet the inclusion/exclusion criteria for study participation. Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Patient 18-75 years of age, inclusive; Patient qualifies for a total knee arthroplasty based on physical exam and medical history including at least one of the following: osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, post-traumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or valgus, varus, or flexion deformities; Patient has undergone a study related informed consent process; Patient (...) Gender Solutions Natural Knee Post-Market Study Gender Solutions Natural Knee Post-Market Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Gender Solutions Natural Knee Post-Market Study The safety

2011 Clinical Trials

165. Guideline for the non-surgical management of hip and knee osteoarthritis

Guideline for the non-surgical management of hip and knee osteoarthritis RACGP - Musculoskeletal health Search Become a student member today for free and be part of the RACGP community A career in general practice Starting the GP journey Enrolments for the 2019.1 OSCE FRACGP exams closing 29 March 2019 Fellowship FRACGP exams Research Practice Experience Program is a self-directed education program designed to support non vocationally registered doctors on their pathway to RACGP Fellowship (...) Fellowship International graduates FRACGP exams RACGP offer courses and events to further develop the knowledge you need to develop your GP career Re-entry to general practice Supervisors and examiners Mental Health (GPMHSC) Research Discover a world of educational opportunities to support your lifelong learning Courses and events QI&CPD Online learning Conferences Become a provider with the QI&CPD Program and be recognised for the quality education and training you offer GPs Curriculum for Australian

2009 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

166. Rickets

before fusion of the epiphyses, and typically affects the wrists, knees, and costochondral junctions. Rickets occurs primarily as a result of a nutritional deficiency of vitamin D, but can be associated with nutritional deficiencies of calcium or phosphorus. Hypophosphataemic rickets is a common genetic cause of rickets. The mainstay of treatment is to correct vitamin D deficiency and to ensure adequate calcium intake. Vitamin D deficient rickets can be prevented in many cases by ensuring (...) Sep;34(3):537-53, vii. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16085158?tool=bestpractice.com Pitt MJ. Rickets and osteomalacia are still around. Radiol Clin North Am. 1991 Jan;29(1):97-118. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1985332?tool=bestpractice.com Rickets can manifest in childhood at the distal forearm, knee, and costochondral joints, as these are sites of rapid bone growth, where large quantities of calcium and phosphorus are required for mineralisation. Wharton B, Bishop N. Rickets. Lancet

2019 BMJ Best Practice

167. Tendinopathy

tendon in the knee, and Achilles' tendon in the heel. In athletes, common locations for tendinopathy include the Achilles' and patella tendons. In the general population, the Achilles' and lateral epicondyle are the most commonly affected. There are many terms used to characterise chronic tendon disorders. Tendonitis refers to a painful tendon with histological signs of inflammation within the tendon. Tendinosis is a localised intrinsic degeneration of unknown aetiology, characterised by localised (...) /pubmed/9848596?tool=bestpractice.com Kountouris A, Cook J. Rehabilitation of Achilles and patellar tendinopathies. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Apr;21(2):295-316. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17512484?tool=bestpractice.com Khan KM, Cook JL, Kannus P, et al. Time to abandon the "tendonitis" myth. BMJ. 2002 Mar 16;324(7338):626-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11895810?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors insidious onset well-localised tenderness pain during

2019 BMJ Best Practice

168. Psoriasis

Psoriasis Psoriasis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Psoriasis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Lesions are red, inflamed, silvery-white scaly, and circumscribed papules and plaques; often affecting elbows, knees, extensor limbs, and scalp, and, less commonly, nails, ear, and umbilical region. Typically lifelong, with a fluctuating course of exacerbations and remission (...) papules, and plaques. It can cause itching, irritation, burning, and stinging. Although the classification typically includes psoriatic arthritis, skin manifestations only are discussed in this topic. History and exam skin lesions family history skin discomfort genetic infection local trauma stress smoking light skin alcohol intake (beer) Diagnostic investigations clinical diagnosis skin biopsy Treatment algorithm ONGOING Contributors Authors Assistant Professor University of Pisa Consultant

2019 BMJ Best Practice

169. Gout

destruction; renal glomerular, tubular and interstitial disease; and uric acid urolithiasis. The disease most commonly affects the first toe (podagra), foot, ankle, knee, fingers, wrist, and elbow; however, it can affect any joint. History and exam presence of risk factors rapid-onset severe pain joint stiffness foot joint distribution few affected joints swelling and joint effusion tenderness tophi erythema and warmth family history of gout older age male sex menopausal status consumption of meat

2019 BMJ Best Practice

170. Cerebral palsy

of abnormal parturition, difficult labours, premature birth, and asphyxia neonatorum, on the mental and physical condition of the child, especially in relation to deformities. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1966 May-Jun;46:7-22. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5950310?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors delay in motor development delay in speech development delay in cognitive/intellectual development retention of primitive reflexes lack of age-appropriate reflexes spasticity/clonus (...) selective voluntary motor control impairment toe walking/knee hyperextension scissoring crouched gait contractures muscle weakness joint instability/dislocation dystonia chorea athetosis ataxia neonatal hypotonia scoliosis prematurity fetal birth asphyxia multiple births maternal illness fetal brain malformation major birth defects familial metabolic/genetic disorder neonatal complications maternal teratogen exposure low socioeconomic status non-vertex presentation postmaturity head injury Diagnostic

2019 BMJ Best Practice

172. Osteochondritis dissecans

of both juvenile and adult osteochondritis dissecans remains unclear. Robertson W, Kelly BT, Green DW. Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee in children. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2003 Feb;15(1):38-44. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12544270?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors pain is exacerbated by activity location of pain anteromedial aspect of the knee with the knee flexed to 90 degrees location of pain lateral aspect of elbow location of pain posteromedial aspect (...) Osteochondritis dissecans Osteochondritis dissecans - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Osteochondritis dissecans Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Majority of patients are adolescent or young adult athletes. Main joints involved include the knee, ankle, and radiocapitellar joint of the elbow. Bilateral in up to 25%. Variable presentation: traumatic or atraumatic, insidious

2018 BMJ Best Practice

173. Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis

Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary A type of systemic sclerosis characterised by skin fibrosis of the fingers (sclerodactyly) and, in some cases, of the face and neck or the skin distal to the elbows and/or knees. It does (...) ://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3361530?tool=bestpractice.com lcSSc is characterised by skin fibrosis of the fingers (sclerodactyly) and, in some cases, of the face and neck or the skin distal to the elbows and/or knees. It does not affect the upper arms, upper legs, or trunk. In contrast, dcSSc also affects the trunk and the skin distal and proximal to the elbows and/or knees. The presence of anti-centromere antibodies is uncommon in patients with dcSSc; however, anti-topoisomerase I and anti-RNA polymerase III

2018 BMJ Best Practice

174. Musculoskeletal lower back pain

://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=736814 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17909209?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam obesity, stress, and psychiatric comorbidities history of prior lower back pain history of prior treatment pain radiation does not extend beyond the knee absence of red-flag symptoms absence of fever, fluctuance, exquisite tenderness to palpation sensory, motor, and deep-tendon reflex examinations within normal limits negative straight- or crossed straight-leg raise test dull

2018 BMJ Best Practice

175. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition

or more joints. Knees, wrists, shoulders, ankles, elbows, or hands can be affected. The chronic form of CPP arthritis mimics osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and is associated with variable degrees of inflammation. McCarty DJ. Diagnostic mimicry in arthritis: patterns of joint involvement associated with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposits. Bull Rheum Dis. 1975;25:804-809. CPPD typically occurs in older patients but can occur in younger patients with associated metabolic conditions (...) , such as hyperparathyroidism and haemochromatosis. Zhang W, Doherty M, Bardin T, et al. European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for calcium pyrophosphate deposition. Part I: terminology and diagnosis. Ann Rheum Dis. 2011 Apr;70(4):563-70. http://ard.bmj.com/content/70/4/563.long http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21216817?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors painful and tender joints osteoarthritis-like involvement of joints (wrists, shoulders) sudden worsening of osteoarthritis red

2018 BMJ Best Practice

176. Scabies

:1718-1727. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16625010?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam infants, children, and the elderly hx of overcrowding hx of itching in family members or close contacts over the same period generalised and intense pruritus, typically worse at night burrows papules, vesicles, excoriations positive ink burrow test papules on face, neck, palms, and soles in children immunosuppression bullae thick, crusted lesions occurring on elbows, knees, hands, and feet with dystrophic

2018 BMJ Best Practice

177. Psoriasis

Psoriasis Psoriasis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Psoriasis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Lesions are red, inflamed, silvery-white scaly, and circumscribed papules and plaques; often affecting elbows, knees, extensor limbs, and scalp, and, less commonly, nails, ear, and umbilical region. Typically lifelong, with a fluctuating course of exacerbations and remission (...) papules, and plaques. It can cause itching, irritation, burning, and stinging. Although the classification typically includes psoriatic arthritis, skin manifestations only are discussed in this topic. History and exam skin lesions family history skin discomfort genetic infection local trauma stress smoking light skin alcohol intake (beer) Diagnostic investigations clinical diagnosis skin biopsy Treatment algorithm ONGOING Contributors Authors Assistant Professor University of Pisa Consultant

2018 BMJ Best Practice

178. Osteoarthritis

://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16543327?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam presence of risk factors pain functional difficulties knee, hip, hand, or spine involvement bony deformities limited range of motion malalignment tenderness crepitus stiffness shoulder, elbow, wrist, or ankle involvement effusion antalgic gait age >50 years female gender obesity genetic factors physical/manual occupation knee malalignment high bone mineral density Diagnostic investigations x-ray of affected joints serum CRP serum ESR (...) Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Osteoarthritis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary A degenerative joint disorder; prevalence increases with age. Most commonly affected joints are the knee, hip, hands, and lumbar and cervical spine. Presents with joint pain and stiffness that is typically worse with activity. Radiographs show loss of joint space

2018 BMJ Best Practice

179. Giant cell arteritis

to optic nerve ischaemia. GCA is sometimes also referred to as temporal arteritis, cranial arteritis, or granulomatous arteritis. History and exam presence of risk factors headache polymyalgia rheumatica symptoms extremity claudication other cranial artery abnormalities loss of vision jaw claudication superficial temporal artery tenderness, thickening, or nodularity absent temporal artery pulse abnormal fundoscopy systemic symptoms neurological symptoms cough, sore throat, hoarseness bruit (...) on auscultation asymmetric blood pressure shoulder tenderness limited active range of movement of shoulders and hips wrist and knee swelling age >50 years female sex genetic factors smoking atherosclerosis environmental factors Diagnostic investigations ESR CRP FBC LFTs temporal artery biopsy temporal artery ultrasound aortic arch angiography FDG-PET scan of head to mid-thigh ultrasound scan of the upper extremity arteries Treatment algorithm INITIAL ONGOING Contributors Authors Professor of Medicine Mayo

2018 BMJ Best Practice

180. Gout

destruction; renal glomerular, tubular and interstitial disease; and uric acid urolithiasis. The disease most commonly affects the first toe (podagra), foot, ankle, knee, fingers, wrist, and elbow; however, it can affect any joint. History and exam presence of risk factors rapid-onset severe pain joint stiffness foot joint distribution few affected joints swelling and joint effusion tenderness tophi erythema and warmth family history of gout older age male sex menopausal status consumption of meat

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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