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Knee Effusion Causes

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1. Knee Effusion Causes

Knee Effusion Causes Knee Effusion Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Knee Effusion Causes Knee Effusion Causes (...) Aka: Knee Effusion Causes II. Causes: Trauma Ligament injury Medial Lateral injury subluxation dislocation Intra-articular III. Causes: Rheumatic Conditions IV. Causes: Infectious Disease V. Causes: Malignant Tumor Chondroblastoma Giant cell tumor Synovial VI. Causes: Benign Tumor Aneurysmal bone cyst Fibrous cortical defect Fibrous dysplasia Osteochondroma Pigmented villonodular synovitis Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search

2018 FP Notebook

2. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy: an Unusual Cause of Knee Pain and Recurrent Effusion (PubMed)

Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy: an Unusual Cause of Knee Pain and Recurrent Effusion 27703424 2019 02 26 1556-3316 12 3 2016 Oct HSS journal : the musculoskeletal journal of Hospital for Special Surgery HSS J Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy: an Unusual Cause of Knee Pain and Recurrent Effusion. 284-286 Swarup Ishaan I Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 USA. Mintz Douglas N DN Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital (...) for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 USA. Salvati Eduardo A EA Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 USA. eng Case Reports 2016 08 30 United States HSS J 101273938 1556-3316 case report hypertrophic osteoarthropathy knee pain total knee arthroplasty Ishaan Swarup, MD, Douglas N. Mintz, MD and Eduardo A. Salvati MD declare that they have no conflict of interest. Human/Animal Rights All procedures followed were

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2016 HSS Journal

3. Gamechanger? The Effect of Intra-articular Triamcinolone vs Saline on Knee Cartilage Volume and Pain in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis ? A Randomized Clinical Trial

age 45 years or older, and met knee OA criteria as defined by the American College of Rheumatology. These criteria are based on a standardized questionnaire about knee pain, as well as tibiofemoral OA evident on radiographs. Eligibility criteria further included ultrasonographic evidence of effusion and synovitis. Participants were excluded if they had other disorders affecting the study joint, including systemic inflammatory joint disease, prior sepsis, or osteonecrosis; chronic or recent use (...) , cartilage damage, and effusion volume were measured. What were the study results? The 2 primary outcomes of the study were change in knee cartilage volume and change in pain. Seventy participants were enrolled in each arm of the study. Intention-to-treat analyses were used for all outcomes. The group receiving triamcinolone injections was slightly older (59.1 years vs 57.2 years), but otherwise the 2 groups were matched in baseline characteristics including knee pain, function, and stiffness. Use

2018 Clinical Correlations

4. Knee Effusion

Knee Effusion Knee Effusion Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Knee Effusion Knee Effusion Aka: Knee Effusion II. Causes (...) See III. Signs Swollen knee assumes 15-25 degree resting position Landmarks of anterior knee obscured by fluid IV. Labs See V. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Knee Effusion." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Knee joint effusion (C0343166) Concepts Pathologic Function ( T046 ) ICD10 , SnomedCT

2018 FP Notebook

5. Acute Septic Arthritis of the Knee Caused by Kingella kingae in a 5-Year-Old Cameroonian Boy (PubMed)

Acute Septic Arthritis of the Knee Caused by Kingella kingae in a 5-Year-Old Cameroonian Boy Kingella kingae is an important cause of invasive infections in young children from Western countries. Although increasing reports indicate that this organism is the leading agent of bone and joint infections in early childhood, data on K. kingae infections from resource-limited settings are scarce, and none has yet been reported in Africa. We herein report the diagnostic and epidemiological (...) revealed right-sided knee tenderness and effusion that was confirmed by ultrasound imaging. Laboratory results showed a white blood cell count of 5,700 cells/mm3, C-reactive protein level of 174 mg/L, and platelet count of 495,000 cells/mm3. He underwent an arthrocentesis and was immediately given intravenous amoxicillin-clavulanate. Conventional cultures from blood samples and synovial fluids were negative. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the broad-range 16S rRNA gene and real-time

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2017 Frontiers in pediatrics

6. Exam Series: Guide to the Knee Exam

joint. The suprapatellar and posterior bursa communicate directly with the joint cavity and will be enlarged with a joint effusion, posteriorly this is known as a Bakers cyst. The popliteal artery, vein, peroneal and tibial nerve run through the popliteal fossa. Anatomy of the Knee 1 Approach to the History A thorough history can provide several diagnostic clues and help to risk stratify patients. In some cases the physical examination may be limited by pain or a large effusion, so the history helps (...) to form an overall impression of the case. History of Presenting Illness: Understanding the mechanism of injury is essential in the assessment of knee pain. An acute and traumatic etiology suggests a structural cause of pain. It is also important to determine whether the patient has been able to weight bear, as this guides imaging decisions. Pain characteristics: Identify the onset, position (anterior vs. posterior, medial vs. lateral), quality, radiation, severity, and duration of the pain

2018 CandiEM

7. Chronic Knee Pain

, adhesive capsulitis, medial plicae, discoid meniscus, tumors, ganglion cysts, pigmented villonodular synovitis, osteophytes, and osteonecrosis [15,19,36-45]. MRI without and with IV contrast is not usually indicated when initial radiograph is negative or demonstrates a joint effusion. However, contrast-enhanced images may be more accurate in diagnosing other causes of chronic knee pain, such as Hoffa’s disease, deep infrapatellar bursitis, patellofemoral friction syndrome, and adhesive capsulitis [15 (...) . Chronic knee pain. Initial knee radiograph negative or demonstrates joint effusion. Next imaging procedure. Procedure Appropriateness Category Relative Radiation Level MRI knee without IV contrast Usually Appropriate O Aspiration knee May Be Appropriate Varies CT arthrography knee May Be Appropriate ? CT knee without IV contrast May Be Appropriate ? US knee May Be Appropriate (Disagreement) O Radiography hip ipsilateral May Be Appropriate ??? Radiography lumbar spine May Be Appropriate ??? MR

2018 American College of Radiology

8. Guideline for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis

Guideline for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis racgp.org.au Healthy Profession. Healthy Australia. Guideline for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis Second editionGuideline for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis. Second edition Disclaimer The information set out in this publication is current at the date of first publication and is intended for use as a guide of a general nature only and may or may not be relevant to particular patients or circumstances. Nor (...) shall have no liability (including without limitation liability by reason of negligence) to any users of the information contained in this publication for any loss or damage (consequential or otherwise), cost or expense incurred or arising by reason of any person using or relying on the information contained in this publication and whether caused by reason of any error, negligent act, omission or misrepresentation in the information. Recommended citation The Royal Australian College of General

2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

9. Quadriceps corticomotor excitability following an experimental knee joint effusion. (PubMed)

Quadriceps corticomotor excitability following an experimental knee joint effusion. Deficits in quadriceps strength and voluntary activation are common following knee injury. These deficits are hypothesized to generate from a neural level, however, it remains unclear how corticomotor pathways are affected following acute injury. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether corticomotor alterations of the quadriceps were present following a simulated knee joint injury using (...) an experimental effusion model.Participants completed two testing sessions, an experimental knee effusion and control session, separated by 7 days. The central activation ratio was used to assess change in quadriceps activation. Corticomotor excitability was assessed pre- and post-intervention via active motor thresholds (AMTs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) normalized to maximal muscle responses. MEPs were assessed at different percentages of AMT, and associated slopes between these percentages were

2015 Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy

10. CRACKCast E057 – Knee and Lower Leg

to the extensor mechanism Treatment: If extensor mechanism is intact = non-operative management Long leg cast 4-6 weeks Or knee immobilization with non-weight bearing crutches ORIF for displaced/open fractures or non-intact extensor mechanism Dislocation: Most common in women (higher Q angle) Can occur due to a direct blow to the medial knee Causes a tear in the medial patellar retinaculum (almost always dislocates laterally) May cause an associated effusion if there is an osteochondral fracture Important (...) Becomes prominent with an enlarging knee effusion Noted in the posterior – medial popliteal fossa – maximal at full knee extension Soften or disappear in flexion Can rupture into the calf and produce a clinical picture similar to DVT Acute complications: Thrombophlebitis Leg ischemia Nerve entrapment Compartment syndrome Ddx: Cystic masses, lipomas, liposarcomas, popliteal artery aneurysms Ultrasound is the diagnostic modality of choice Treatment: investigate the cause of the knee effusion

2017 CandiEM

11. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: An Update Review

of the cartilage that lines the knee joints, the subchondral bone surfaces, and synovium, accompanied by pain, immobility, muscle weakness, and reduction in function and the ability to complete activities of daily living (ADLs). Two types of OA of the knee are recognized: the more prevalent primary OA of the knee is the result of the progressive joint cartilage destruction over time, whereas secondary OA of the knee can be caused by trauma, inactivity, overweight, or a disease process such as rheumatoid (...) Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: An Update Review Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 190 Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: An Update Review eComparative Effectiveness Review Number 190 Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee: An Update Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00010-I Prepared by: RAND Southern California Evidence-based

2017 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

12. Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty

to study the thickness of the polyethylene and thus the extent of wear. ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 12 Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty Radiography Radiographic evaluation of wear is based on weight-bearing AP and lateral radiographs and on axial radiographs. Linear wear is seen as joint space narrowing, varus or valgus deformity, or patellar tilt. An effusion may be present. Findings can be subtle and annual weight-bearing radiographs are recommended for detecting subclinical wear [18 (...) that leukocyte/marrow imaging was significantly more accurate than bone scan (50%), bone/gallium scan (66%), and leukocyte/bone imaging (70%) in their population. ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 18 Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty FDG-PET/CT FDG-PET/CT scans may be useful for detecting infection after joint replacement. FDG-PET images reflect relative levels of glucose uptake and thus reflect the localized level of metabolic activity. Zhuang et al [105] reported that elevated glycolytic activity causes

2017 American College of Radiology

13. Knee Effusion Causes

Knee Effusion Causes Knee Effusion Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Knee Effusion Causes Knee Effusion Causes (...) Aka: Knee Effusion Causes II. Causes: Trauma Ligament injury Medial Lateral injury subluxation dislocation Intra-articular III. Causes: Rheumatic Conditions IV. Causes: Infectious Disease V. Causes: Malignant Tumor Chondroblastoma Giant cell tumor Synovial VI. Causes: Benign Tumor Aneurysmal bone cyst Fibrous cortical defect Fibrous dysplasia Osteochondroma Pigmented villonodular synovitis Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search

2015 FP Notebook

14. Knee Surgery

care Meniscectomy, full or partial (in a non- degenerative knee) Acute meniscal tear in an otherwise non-degenerative knee AND Onset of symptoms within 12 weeks of injury Discrete event associated with the acute onset of any of the following symptoms: • Pain • Swelling • Locking, catching, or popping Positive McMurray’s sign OR Anatomically consistent joint line tenderness OR Effusion OR Limited range of motion OR Mechanical locking, catching, or popping Note: The combination of positive McMurray’s (...) , and such physical conditions as result therefrom.” c This is based on medical opinion with a more probable than not degree of medical certainty. Occupational disease is defined in RCW 51.08.140 as a “disease or infection that arises naturally and proximately out of employment.” d Establishing an occupational disease diagnosis requires that all of the following criteria are met: 1. Exposure: Workplace activities that contribute to or cause knee conditions, and 2. Outcome: Diagnosis of a knee condition that meets

2016 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

15. Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking

Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Update of the guidelines issued by the 2011 hearing commission GUIDELINES TEXT July 2017 CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE The good practice guidelines (GPG) are defined in the health field as methodically developed proposals to assist the practitioner and the patient to find the most appropriate care in given clinical circumstances. The GPGs are rigorous summaries (...) and paraclinical assessment necessary and sufficient to detect them 9 1.3 Differential diagnoses for NAHI caused by shaking 14 1.4 Action to be taken, depending on the clinical situation 14 2. Causal mechanism of the lesions 16 2.1 Shaking without impact 16 2.2 Shaking by a child 17 2.3 Mild head injury caused by a fall from a low height ( 10 RH but 50% of the retina Depth = depends on the layer of the retina reached: ? i = intraretinal haemorrhages (excluding the region under the internal limiting membrane

2017 HAS Guidelines

16. Medial Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty vs Total Knee Arthroplasty

into a 5-digit number that describes the patient's health state. The EQ VAS records the patient's self-rated health on a vertical visual analogue scale, where the endpoints are labelled 'The best health you can imagine' and 'The worst health you can imagine'. The VAS can be used as a quantitative measure of health outcome that reflect the patient's own judgement. Clinical outcome [ Time Frame: 20 years ] knee effusion Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing (...) of the knee as diagnosed on posteroanterior and lateral projections of the knee, and symptoms of sufficient severity to justify arthroplasty. Each patient can only participate with one knee, but may be eligible with both knees. Eligibility is independent of possible previous procedures to index or contralateral knee, and to age, sex, occupation and etiology of the anteromedial OA. Bone og Bone medially on pre-operative radiographs. Exclusion Criteria: knee instability caused by either cruciate

2017 Clinical Trials

17. Correlations between ultrasonographic findings, clinical scores, and depression in patients with knee osteoarthritis (PubMed)

Correlations between ultrasonographic findings, clinical scores, and depression in patients with knee osteoarthritis This study aimed to explore correlations between the presence of depression, clinical scores, and ultrasonographic (US) grading in osteoarthritis (OA) patients and to clarify if depressive symptoms might cause a discrepancy between US findings and clinical scores.Two hundred patients with primary knee OA and 100 healthy hospital volunteers of the same age and sex not complaining (...) US measurements apart from lateral femoral cartilage thickness, medial femoral cartilage thickness, and thickness of quadriceps tendon. There were statistically significant correlations between BDI in OA patients and the WOMAC (p=0.005), Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading (p=0.034), and US grading (p=0.041).The presence of knee effusion, Baker's cysts, osteophytes, and high BMI have a great impact on the pain and disability associated with OA. Higher clinical scores, radiographic scores, and US

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2017 European journal of rheumatology

18. Microstructural scaffold (patch) insertion without autologous cell implantation for repairing symptomatic chondral knee defects

indications and adjunctive treatments. Outcome measures should include symptom relief, functional ability, long-term outcomes measured by appropriate imaging techniques and patient-reported outcomes. 2 2 Indications and current treatments Indications and current treatments 2.1 Chondral damage (or localised damage to the articular cartilage) in the knee can be caused by injury or arthritis, or it can occur spontaneously (a condition called osteochondritis dissecans). It may also happen because of knee (...) instability, muscle weakness, or abnormal unbalanced pressures, for example, after an injury to a ligament or meniscal cartilage. In young people, the most common cause of cartilage damage is sporting injuries. Symptoms associated with cartilage loss include pain, swelling, instability, joint catching and locking, and may lead to degenerative changes in the joint (osteoarthritis). 2.2 There is no uniform approach to managing cartilage defects in the knee. Treatment options depend on the size of the defect

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

19. IL-1RA Treatment in Patients With Acute ACL Tear and Painful Effusions

Sponsor: Carolyn Hettrich Collaborator: Arthritis Foundation Information provided by (Responsible Party): Carolyn Hettrich, University of Kentucky Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Injury to the knee during sports participation often involves partial or full detachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (abbreviated as ACL). ACL tears cause pain, swelling and inflammation. While the swelling and inflammation usually goes away in time, individuals with ACL injuries may experience pain (...) and notice knee instability (knee slipping, etc.). Often surgery can repair or replace the ACL within the joint, allowing individuals the ability to walk or run again pain free or participate in sports. Unfortunately, osteoarthritis of the knee, which also causes pain and swelling, can occur in that same knee 10-20 years later for reasons which are not well understood. In this research study, the investigator hopes to reduce the initial pre-operative pain. The reduction of pain will allow for earlier

2016 Clinical Trials

20. Safety and efficacy of allogenic placental mesenchymal stem cells for treating knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study. (PubMed)

Safety and efficacy of allogenic placental mesenchymal stem cells for treating knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common skeletal impairment that can cause many limitations in normal life activities. Stem cell therapy has been studied for decades for its regenerative potency in various diseases. We investigated the safety and efficacy of intra-articular injection of placental mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in knee OA healing.In this double-blind, placebo-controlled (...) effusion and increased local pain, which resolved safely within 48-72 h. In 2 weeks post-injection there was no serious adverse effect and all of the laboratory test results were unchanged. Early after treatment, there was a significant knee ROM improvement and pain reduction (effect size, 1.4). Significant improvements were seen in quality of life, activity of daily living, sport/recreational activity and decreased OA symptoms in the MSC-injected group until 8 weeks (P < 0.05). These clinical

2019 Cytotherapy

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