How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

62 results for

Ischiorectal Abscess

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Ischiorectal Abscess

Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess (...) Aka: Ischiorectal Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Represents 25% of III. Pathophysiology involving ischiorectal space Anatomic boundaries Lateral to external sphincter Below levator ani IV. Signs: Low Abscess See Infection of fatty tissue below Perianal tenderness and swelling 2-3 cm from anal verge V. Differential Diagnosis High Abscess Low Abscess (immediately adjacent to anal verge) VI. Radiology: Intrarectal Ultrasound Evaluation of complex or suspected high abscess VII

2018 FP Notebook

2. Management of Anorectal Abscess, Fistula-in-Ano, and Rectovaginal Fistula

OF THE PROBLEM a generally accepted explanation for the etiology of anorectal abscess and fistula-in-ano is that the abscess results from obstruction of an anal gland and the fistula is due to chronic infection and epithelialization of the abscess drainage tract. 1–6 a norectal abscesses are defined by the anatomic space in which they develop and are more common in the perianal and ischiorectal spaces and less common in the intersphincteric, supralevator, and submucosal locations. 7–11 a norectal abscess (...) .; Daniel h erzig, m.D.; liliana Bordeianou, m.D. REFERENCES 1. eisenhammer s. t he internal anal sphincter and the anorectal abscess. Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1956;103:501–506. 2. Cox sW, senagore aJ, l uchtefeld ma, mazier WP. outcome after incision and drainage with fistulotomy for ischiorectal abscess. Am Surg. 1997;63:686–689. 3. Gosselink mP , van onkelen Rs, schouten WR. t he cryptoglan- dular theory revisited. Colorectal Dis. 2015;17:1041–1043. 4. ommer a, h erold a, Berg e, fürst a, schiedeck t

2016 American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

3. Ischiorectal Abscess

Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ischiorectal Abscess Ischiorectal Abscess (...) Aka: Ischiorectal Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Represents 25% of III. Pathophysiology involving ischiorectal space Anatomic boundaries Lateral to external sphincter Below levator ani IV. Signs: Low Abscess See Infection of fatty tissue below Perianal tenderness and swelling 2-3 cm from anal verge V. Differential Diagnosis High Abscess Low Abscess (immediately adjacent to anal verge) VI. Radiology: Intrarectal Ultrasound Evaluation of complex or suspected high abscess VII

2015 FP Notebook

4. Perirectal Abscess

: Perirectal Abscess , Anorectal Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology More common in men III. Pathophysiology Infection of the 6-12 anal glands and crypts that surround the anus Occurs at mucocutaneous junction ( ) Contiguous spread of infection in to ischiorectal space Causative organisms: Mixed infection with fecal flora fragilis (most common in adults) (most common in children) IV. Types (60%) Local Immediately adjacent to anal verge Proximal infection spread through the internal and external (...) Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Aka

2018 FP Notebook

5. Management of Tumors of the Ischiorectal Fossa: The Role of Percutaneous Biopsy. (Abstract)

reviewed. They were all presented and discussed in a multidisciplinary team meeting. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in all the patients. Inflammatory pathologies, such as abscess, were excluded from the analysis.Percutaneous biopsy and surgical excision of ischiorectal fossa tumors were reviewed.Perioperative, pathological, and oncological outcomes were measured.Eleven patients were identified (8 female; median age, 50 years; range, 25-90). Percutaneous biopsy was undertaken in 8 patients (...) Management of Tumors of the Ischiorectal Fossa: The Role of Percutaneous Biopsy. Noninflammatory masses in the ischiorectal fossa are rare.This study aimed to review our experience with ischiorectal fossa tumors and to address the question of whether percutaneous biopsy should be undertaken.This is a retrospective study.This study was conducted at a tertiary institution.From April 2007 to November 2014, all consecutive ischiorectal fossa masses treated in a referral center were retrospectively

2015 Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

6. Perianal Abscess (Diagnosis)

the internal sphincter into the intersphincteric space. Once infection gains access to the intersphincteric space, it has easy access to the adjacent perirectal spaces. Extension of the infection can involve the intersphincteric space, ischiorectal space, or even the supralevator space. In some instances, the abscess remains contained within the intersphincteric space. The severity and depth of the abscess are quite variable, and the abscess cavity is often associated with formation of a fistulous tract (...) locations (see the image below): Perianal Ischiorectal Intersphincteric Supralevator Illustration of major types of anorectal abscesses (submucosal type not pictured). Perianal abscesses represent the most common type of anorectal abscesses, accounting for approximately 60% of reported cases. [ , , , ] These superficial collections of purulent material are located beneath the skin of the anal canal and do not transverse the external sphincter. Ischiorectal abscesses are the next most common type

2014 eMedicine Surgery

7. Perianal Abscess (Overview)

the internal sphincter into the intersphincteric space. Once infection gains access to the intersphincteric space, it has easy access to the adjacent perirectal spaces. Extension of the infection can involve the intersphincteric space, ischiorectal space, or even the supralevator space. In some instances, the abscess remains contained within the intersphincteric space. The severity and depth of the abscess are quite variable, and the abscess cavity is often associated with formation of a fistulous tract (...) locations (see the image below): Perianal Ischiorectal Intersphincteric Supralevator Illustration of major types of anorectal abscesses (submucosal type not pictured). Perianal abscesses represent the most common type of anorectal abscesses, accounting for approximately 60% of reported cases. [ , , , ] These superficial collections of purulent material are located beneath the skin of the anal canal and do not transverse the external sphincter. Ischiorectal abscesses are the next most common type

2014 eMedicine Surgery

8. Perirectal Abscess (Treatment)

infections and typically indicate that there is no risk of subsequent fistula formation. Treatment of ischiorectal, intersphincteric, and supralevator abscesses typically requires general or regional anesthesia. To drain an ischiorectal abscess, a cruciate incision is made at the site of maximal swelling. Pus is drained and cultured. The ischiorectal fossa is probed with a finger or hemostat to disrupt loculations and facilitate drainage. Placement of a drain is indicated only for the management (...) and etiology of the lesion. Failure to take the primary etiology into account in the management of a supralevator abscess may lead to iatrogenic fistula formation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) can exclude intra-abdominal or pelvic pathology as possible sources. If the supralevator abscess evolved from the extension of an ischiorectal abscess, external drainage through the ischiorectal fossa would be indicated. If the abscess resulted from an upward extension

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

9. Perirectal Abscess (Diagnosis)

through the internal sphincter into the intersphincteric space. Once infection gains access to the intersphincteric space, it has easy access to the adjacent perirectal spaces. Extension of the infection can involve the intersphincteric space, ischiorectal space, or even the supralevator space. In some instances, the abscess remains contained within the intersphincteric space. The severity and depth of the abscess are quite variable, and the abscess cavity is often associated with formation (...) ; the following are the most common locations (see the image below): Perianal Ischiorectal Intersphincteric Supralevator Illustration of major types of anorectal abscesses (submucosal type not pictured). Perianal abscesses represent the most common type of anorectal abscesses, accounting for approximately 60% of reported cases. [ , , , ] These superficial collections of purulent material are located beneath the skin of the anal canal and do not transverse the external sphincter. Ischiorectal abscesses

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

10. Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Follow-up)

should revert to the most conservative approach possible. This would include the addition of antibiotics if they had been withheld thus far, the drainage of any abscesses, and the search for deep infection in the ischiorectal fossa via computed tomography (CT). Such deep infections occur in the adult population but are virtually unheard of in the pediatric population. Previous Next: Antibiotics The use of antibiotics to treat anorectal abscesses remains controversial. Traditional teaching holds (...) Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Follow-up) Anorectal Abscess in Children Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Nonoperative Therapy, Antibiotics Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

11. Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Treatment)

should revert to the most conservative approach possible. This would include the addition of antibiotics if they had been withheld thus far, the drainage of any abscesses, and the search for deep infection in the ischiorectal fossa via computed tomography (CT). Such deep infections occur in the adult population but are virtually unheard of in the pediatric population. Previous Next: Antibiotics The use of antibiotics to treat anorectal abscesses remains controversial. Traditional teaching holds (...) Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Treatment) Anorectal Abscess in Children Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Nonoperative Therapy, Antibiotics Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

12. Perianal Abscess (Treatment)

infections and typically indicate that there is no risk of subsequent fistula formation. Treatment of ischiorectal, intersphincteric, and supralevator abscesses typically requires general or regional anesthesia. To drain an ischiorectal abscess, a cruciate incision is made at the site of maximal swelling. Pus is drained and cultured. The ischiorectal fossa is probed with a finger or hemostat to disrupt loculations and facilitate drainage. Placement of a drain is indicated only for the management (...) and etiology of the lesion. Failure to take the primary etiology into account in the management of a supralevator abscess may lead to iatrogenic fistula formation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) can exclude intra-abdominal or pelvic pathology as possible sources. If the supralevator abscess evolved from the extension of an ischiorectal abscess, external drainage through the ischiorectal fossa would be indicated. If the abscess resulted from an upward extension

2014 eMedicine Surgery

13. Perirectal Abscess (Follow-up)

infections and typically indicate that there is no risk of subsequent fistula formation. Treatment of ischiorectal, intersphincteric, and supralevator abscesses typically requires general or regional anesthesia. To drain an ischiorectal abscess, a cruciate incision is made at the site of maximal swelling. Pus is drained and cultured. The ischiorectal fossa is probed with a finger or hemostat to disrupt loculations and facilitate drainage. Placement of a drain is indicated only for the management (...) and etiology of the lesion. Failure to take the primary etiology into account in the management of a supralevator abscess may lead to iatrogenic fistula formation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) can exclude intra-abdominal or pelvic pathology as possible sources. If the supralevator abscess evolved from the extension of an ischiorectal abscess, external drainage through the ischiorectal fossa would be indicated. If the abscess resulted from an upward extension

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

14. Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Diagnosis)

The infection can track deeper into what is referred to as the ischiorectal fossa, bounded superiorly by the levator ani muscles; infections in the ischiorectal fossa are rare in the pediatric population Previous Next: Pathophysiology and Etiology The pathophysiology and etiology of anorectal abscess and fistula-in-ano have not yet been fully defined. The prevailing theory is that an infection in an anal crypt, or crypt of Morgagni—that is, cryptitis—progresses and erodes through the wall of the anal canal (...) Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Diagnosis) Anorectal Abscess in Children: Background, Anatomy, Pathophysiology and Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTM1MjI2LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

15. Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Overview)

The infection can track deeper into what is referred to as the ischiorectal fossa, bounded superiorly by the levator ani muscles; infections in the ischiorectal fossa are rare in the pediatric population Previous Next: Pathophysiology and Etiology The pathophysiology and etiology of anorectal abscess and fistula-in-ano have not yet been fully defined. The prevailing theory is that an infection in an anal crypt, or crypt of Morgagni—that is, cryptitis—progresses and erodes through the wall of the anal canal (...) Perianal and Perirectal Abscesses (Overview) Anorectal Abscess in Children: Background, Anatomy, Pathophysiology and Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTM1MjI2LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

16. Perianal Abscess (Follow-up)

infections and typically indicate that there is no risk of subsequent fistula formation. Treatment of ischiorectal, intersphincteric, and supralevator abscesses typically requires general or regional anesthesia. To drain an ischiorectal abscess, a cruciate incision is made at the site of maximal swelling. Pus is drained and cultured. The ischiorectal fossa is probed with a finger or hemostat to disrupt loculations and facilitate drainage. Placement of a drain is indicated only for the management (...) and etiology of the lesion. Failure to take the primary etiology into account in the management of a supralevator abscess may lead to iatrogenic fistula formation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) can exclude intra-abdominal or pelvic pathology as possible sources. If the supralevator abscess evolved from the extension of an ischiorectal abscess, external drainage through the ischiorectal fossa would be indicated. If the abscess resulted from an upward extension

2014 eMedicine Surgery

17. Perirectal Abscess (Overview)

the internal sphincter into the intersphincteric space. Once infection gains access to the intersphincteric space, it has easy access to the adjacent perirectal spaces. Extension of the infection can involve the intersphincteric space, ischiorectal space, or even the supralevator space. In some instances, the abscess remains contained within the intersphincteric space. The severity and depth of the abscess are quite variable, and the abscess cavity is often associated with formation of a fistulous tract (...) locations (see the image below): Perianal Ischiorectal Intersphincteric Supralevator Illustration of major types of anorectal abscesses (submucosal type not pictured). Perianal abscesses represent the most common type of anorectal abscesses, accounting for approximately 60% of reported cases. [ , , , ] These superficial collections of purulent material are located beneath the skin of the anal canal and do not transverse the external sphincter. Ischiorectal abscesses are the next most common type

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

18. Perirectal Abscess

: Perirectal Abscess , Anorectal Abscess From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology More common in men III. Pathophysiology Infection of the 6-12 anal glands and crypts that surround the anus Occurs at mucocutaneous junction ( ) Contiguous spread of infection in to ischiorectal space Causative organisms: Mixed infection with fecal flora fragilis (most common in adults) (most common in children) IV. Types (60%) Local Immediately adjacent to anal verge Proximal infection spread through the internal and external (...) Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perirectal Abscess Perirectal Abscess Aka

2015 FP Notebook

19. Anorectal Abscess

. Treatment is surgical drainage. (See also .) An abscess may be located in various spaces surrounding the rectum and may be superficial or deep. A perianal abscess is superficial and points to the skin. An ischiorectal abscess is deeper, extending across the sphincter into the ischiorectal space below the levator ani; it may penetrate to the contralateral side, forming a “horseshoe” abscess. An abscess above the levator ani (ie, supralevator abscess) is quite deep and may extend to the peritoneum (...) Anorectal Abscess Anorectal Abscess - Gastrointestinal Disorders - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge Helicobacter pylori

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

20. Acute hip pain and inability to ambulate: a rare presentation for perirectal abscess. (Abstract)

tomography (CT) of the hip and pelvis was then obtained, which was negative for boney abnormality but revealed a 5-cm ischiorectal abscess with inflammation of the adjacent gluteus muscle. This case illustrates the potentially subtle nature of a deep perirectal abscess in an elderly patient. The CT imaging, useful for investigating the possibility of occult femoral neck fracture, was fortuitous in leading to the diagnosis. One must consider the possibility of visceral processes causing referred pain (...) Acute hip pain and inability to ambulate: a rare presentation for perirectal abscess. A patient with acute hip pain out of proportion to physical findings and inability to weight bear despite negative plain films warrants further in-depth evaluation. Correctly diagnosing the cause of hip pain, a common emergency department (ED) complaint, may be a challenge in the geriatric population (Perron A, Miller M, Brady W. Orthopedic pitfalls in the ED: radiographically occult hip fracture. Am J Emerg

2011 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>