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121. Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff

Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction ? A guide for fertility staff ESHRE Psychology and Counselling Guideline Development Group March 2015 Routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction – A guide for fertility staff 1 Disclaimer The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (hereinafter referred to as 'ESHRE') developed the current clinical practice guideline to provide clinical recommendations to improve (...) every effort to compile accurate information and to keep it up-to-date, it cannot, however, guarantee the correctness, completeness, and accuracy of the guideline in every respect. In any event, these clinical practice guidelines do not necessarily represent the views of all clinicians that are members of ESHRE. The information provided in this document does not constitute business, medical, or other professional advice, and is subject to change. 2 CONTENTS Disclaimer 2 I. Introduction and scope

2015 European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

122. Pembrolizumab (Immunotherapy Drug) in Combination With Guadecitabine and Mocetinostat (Epigenetic Drugs) for Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

: pembrolizumab plus guadecitabine and mocetinostat Pembrolizumab given IV; guadecitabine given SQ, mocetinostat given PO. Drug: Pembrolizumab Pembrolizumab will be administered at 200mg IV on day 1 of each 21 day cycle. Drug: Guadecitabine Guadecitabine will be administered subcutaneously given daily on days 1-5 of each cycle with escalating doses by cohort. Drug: Mocetinostat Mocetinostat will be administered orally with escalating doses on days 8, 10, 13, 15, 17 and 20 of each cycle with escalating doses (...) Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Patient must be capable, willing, and able to provide written, informed consent Age ≥ 18 years old Histologically-confirmed stage IIIb or IV NSCLC by the enrolling institution Patients must have progressed on treatment with an anti-PD1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) administered either as monotherapy, or in combination with other checkpoint inhibitors or other therapies. PD-1/PD-L1 treatment progression is defined by meeting all of the following criteria

2017 Clinical Trials

123. This Study in Patients With Different Types of Cancer (Solid Tumours) Aims to Find a Safe Dose of Xentuzumab in Combination With Abemaciclib With or Without Hormonal Therapies. The Study Also Tests How Effective These Medicines Are in Patients With Lung a

carcinoma in situ (DCIS) if properly treated in opinion of the investigator. Patients who must or wish to continue the intake of restricted medications or any drug considered likely to interfere with the safe conduct of the trial Previous treatment in this trial Currently enrolled in another investigational device or drug study, or less than 21 days since ending another investigational device or drug study(s), or receiving other investigational treatment(s). Chronic alcohol or drug abuse or any (...) emergent neutropenia. Have had major surgery (excluding biopsy) < 28 days of the initial dose of any of the study drugs or planned major surgery during study participation. Have active bacterial or fungal infection (that is, requiring IV antibiotics or therapy at time of initiating study treatment), and/or known viral infection (for example, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] antibodies, hepatitis B surface antigen, or hepatitis C antibodies). Screening is not required for enrolment. Patients

2017 Clinical Trials

124. A Study in Healthy Volunteers to Investigate How Much Test Medicine [14C]-Uproleselan is Taken up by the Body When Administered Directly Into the Vein (IV)

and removed from the body when given intravenously (into a vein) in a group of 6 males. 'Radiolabelled' means that the test medicine has a radioactive component which helps us to track where the drug is in the body. Blood urine and fecal samples will be collected at specific times throughout the study to measure amounts of the test medicine in the body. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Healthy Subjects Drug: Uproleselan Phase 1 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study (...) A Study in Healthy Volunteers to Investigate How Much Test Medicine [14C]-Uproleselan is Taken up by the Body When Administered Directly Into the Vein (IV) A Study in Healthy Volunteers to Investigate How Much Test Medicine [14C]-Uproleselan is Taken up by the Body When Administered Directly Into the Vein (IV) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record

2018 Clinical Trials

125. Antithrombotic Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation: CHEST Guideline and Expert Panel Report

, and Evaluation; HAS-BLED = hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function (1 point each), stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile INR, elderly (0.65), drugs/alcohol concom- itantly (1 point each); HEMORR 2 HAGES = hepatic or renal disease, ethanol abuse, malignancy, older, reduced platelet count/function, hypertension, anemia, genetic factors, excessive fall risk, and stroke; HF = heart failure; HR = hazard ratio; ICH = intracranial hemor- rhage; INR = international normalized ratio; LAA = left (...) ),werecommendoralanticoagulationratherthan notherapy,aspirin,orcombinationtherapywithaspirinandclopidogrel.Wherewerecommendor suggest in favor of oral anticoagulation, we suggest using a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anti- coagulant drug rather than adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist therapy. With the latter, it is importanttoaimforgoodqualityanticoagulationcontrolwithatimeintherapeuticrange>70%. Attentiontomodi?ablebleedingriskfactors(eg,uncontrolledBP,labileinternationalnormalized ratios, concomitant use of aspirin or nonsteroidal

2018 American College of Chest Physicians

126. 2018 IDSA Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy

in physicians’ offices or free-standing infusion centers. Healthcare workers administer medications. This model works well for patients who are physically incapable or unwilling to infuse themselves and for Medicare patients (who lack a home infusion insurance benefit). Since intravenous (IV) antimicrobials administered in outpatient clinics are a covered benefit of Medicare part B, the infusion center model tends to minimize a patient’s out-of-pocket expense. This model is resource intensive, requiring (...) for effective monitoring for vascular access complications and antimicrobial adverse events (weak recommendation, low-quality evidence) . III. Can persons who inject drugs (PWID) be treated with OPAT at home? No recommendation can be made about whether PWID may be treated with OPAT at home (no recommendation, low-quality evidence) . Decisions should be made on a case-by-case basis. IV. Should elderly patients be allowed to be treated with OPAT at home? Elderly patients should be allowed to be treated

2018 Infectious Diseases Society of America

127. Perinatal Drug Abuse and Neonatal Drug Withdrawal (Treatment)

Perinatal Drug Abuse and Neonatal Drug Withdrawal (Treatment) Perinatal Drug Abuse and Neonatal Drug Withdrawal Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Consultations, Diet Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) =aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTc4NDkyLXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Perinatal Drug Abuse and Neonatal Drug Withdrawal Treatment & Management Updated: Jan 29, 2014 Author: Marvin Wang, MD; Chief Editor: Ted Rosenkrantz, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Perinatal Drug Abuse and Neonatal Drug Withdrawal Treatment Medical Care Perhaps the most important aspect of medical care for the potentially withdrawing infant should be that all nurseries caring for such infants develop a care protocol addressing screening and treatment

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

128. First report of endocarditis by Gluconobacter spp. in a patient with a history of intravenous-drug abuse. (Abstract)

First report of endocarditis by Gluconobacter spp. in a patient with a history of intravenous-drug abuse. Gluconobacter belongs to the acetic acid bacteria (AAB), which are microorganisms commonly found in the environment and used in the food industry. These bacteria have increasingly been reported as organisms that can potentially infect humans. We report a case of Gluconobacter spp. bloodstream infection associated with endocardial lesions in a 25 year-old female intravenous drug abuser

2012 Journal of Infection

129. Suspected Physical Abuse ? Child

Suspected Physical Abuse ? Child Revised 2016 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Suspected Physical Abuse–Child American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Suspected Physical Abuse–Child Variant 1: Suspected physical abuse. Child =24 months of age. Neurological or visceral injuries not clinically suspected. Initial imaging evaluation. Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* X-ray skeletal survey 9 ??? MRI head without IV contrast 6 O CT head without IV contrast 5 ??? Tc-99m (...) bone scan whole body 4 This procedure is used as a problem- solving study rather than first-line. ???? MRI head without and with IV contrast 2 O CT head with IV contrast 1 ??? CT head without and with IV contrast 1 ???? Rating Scale: 1,2,3 Usually not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation Level Variant 2: Suspected physical abuse. Child >24 months of age. Neurological or visceral injuries not clinically suspected. Initial imaging evaluation. Radiologic

2016 American College of Radiology

130. Integrating collaborative TB and HIV services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs

for people who inject drugs | Consolidated Guidelines II. Definition of key terms People who inject drugs (PWID) refers to people who inject psychotropic (or psychoactive) substances for non- medical purposes. These drugs include opioids, amphetamine-type stimulants, cocaine, hypnotics/sedatives and hallucinogens. Injection may be through intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous routes. The definition does not include people who self-inject medicines for medical purposes, or individuals who self-inject (...) for damages arising from its use. Design by North Creative, Geneva. WHO/HTM/TB/2016.02 WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Integrating collaborative TB and HIV services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs: consolidated guidelines. 1.HIV Infections. 2.Tuberculosis. 3.Drug Users. 4.Substance Abuse, Intravenous – complications. 5.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated. 6.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. II.The End TB Strategy. ISBN 978 92 4 151022 6 (NLM

2016 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

131. Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis: Official ATS/CDC/IDSA Clinical Practice Guidelines

completion of intensive-phase therapy is culture-positive) ? Treatment failure ? Relapse ? Drug resistance ? Homelessness ? Current or prior substance abuse ? Use of intermittent dosing ? HIV infection ? Previous nonadherence to therapy ? Children and adolescents ? Mental, emotional or physical disability (ie, cognitive deficits such as dementia; neurological deficits; medically fragile patients; or patients with blindness or severe loss of vision) ? Resident at correctional or long-term care facility (...) , South Africa; 17 University of Sassari, Italy; and 18 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the Eu- ropeanRespiratorySocietyandtheUSNationalTuberculosisControllersAssociation.RepresentativesfromtheAmericanAcademy ofPediatrics

2016 American Thoracic Society

132. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antifungal Medications Several cases of new-onset dilated cardiomyopathy with subsequent HF with amphotericin B and its liposomal formulation have been reported. In each case, HF symptoms and echocardiographic findings normalized on discontinuation of therapy, which occurred within 10 days to 6 months of drug discontinuation. Anticancer Medications Anthracyclines The anthracyclines are a highly used class of cytotoxic agents that target proliferating cells via a diverse mechanism that includes DNA (...) . Hospitalization for HF is the largest segment of those costs. It is likely that the prevention of drug-drug interactions and direct myocardial toxicity would reduce hospital admissions, thus both reducing costs and improving quality of life. Patients with HF often have a high medication burden consisting of multiple medications and complex dosing regimens. On average, HF patients take 6.8 prescription medications per day, resulting in 10.1 doses a day. This estimate does not include over-the-counter (OTC

2016 American Heart Association

133. Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection

not so identified.xiii Definition of key terms Serodiscordant couples are couples in which one partner is living with HIV and the other is HIV-negative. A couple refers to two people in an ongoing sexual relationship; each of these people is referred to as a partner in the relationship. How individuals define their relationships will vary according to their cultural and social context. Antiretroviral therapy ARV (antiretroviral) drugs refer to the medicines used to treat HIV. ART (antiretroviral (...) ON THE USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS FOR TREATING AND PREVENTING HIV INFECTIONCONSOLIDATED GUIDELINES ON THE USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS FOR TREATING AND PREVENTING HIV INFECTION 2016 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH SECOND EDITIONWHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: recommendations for a public health approach – 2nd ed. 1.HIV Infections – drug therapy. 2.HIV Infections – prevention

2016 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

134. Awareness to Recovery Care Pathway for Treatment of Youth (12?24) Experiencing Psychoactive Prescription Drug Harms

prescription opioids • Bup + naloxone (nal) can follow same steps and dosages as adults; higher than normal doses might be required to cope with non- withdrawal pain relief Medication- Assisted Therapy • Methadone less appropriate for youth due to lower safety margin, higher abuse potential, stigma, restricted access and use profile of youth • Longer term bup treatment (12 weeks) produced better abstinence and economic outcomes than when used only for detoxification • SAMSHA suggests treatment should (...) readiness for change • Which professionals should be performing each of the following steps? • Do the pathways differ for a primary care physician versus a mental health or addictions specialist? Assessment • No tools specific to psychoactive prescription drugs • Caution about DSM-IV is needed as symptoms of abuse are not necessarily always less severe than those of dependence • Published literature hasn’t caught up to DSM-V • Composite International Diagnostic Interview has not been evaluated for use

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

135. Substance Abuse in Canada: The Effects of Cannabis Use during Adolescence (Report)

, including the prevention of alcohol problems, alternative sanctions for cannabis use and possession, drug-impaired driving, and the abuse and diversion of prescription medication. The second report, Focus on Youth, looked at the prevalence of substance use and its associated harms among young people, exploring the underlying neurobiology of substance use in adolescence and identifying existing gaps in youth-centric services. The third edition, Concurrent Disorders, focused on the co-occurrence of mental (...) health and substance abuse problems, examining the interconnections between addiction and mental illness, the costs concurrent disorders place on the healthcare system, and why treating these complex cases requires new and innovative approaches. The fourth in the series, Licit and Illicit Drug Use during Pregnancy, addressed the medical and obstetrical consequences of drug abuse and dependency in pregnant women, as well as the short- and long-term effects that prenatal exposure to drugs can have

2015 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

136. Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) in the ED: Implications for EM Practice

outside of a hospital setting 13 and Bill C-14 explicitly acknowledges that self-administration of medication should be a viable option 1 . Self-administration may not become part of the assisted dying landscape in Canada for a while, however, as the most commonly used oral medications for assisted death in regions like Oregon and Washington (secobarbital and pentobarbital) are currently not available in Canada – though that may change 14 . And while those drugs are the most common options, they’re (...) cases in the past 17 years where patients regained consciousness after ingesting medication. Complications aside, of the 536 cases where the data is available, there is a reported time range from ingestion to death of 1 minute to 104 hours, with a median time of 25 minutes. Data from the Netherlands in the 1990s suggests similar issues 16 . Of 114 cases of assisted death using self-administered oral medications, 10% had some technical problem (most commonly difficulty was ingesting the drug), 7% had

2016 CandiEM

137. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines for Comprehensive Medical Care of Patients with Obesity

. The presented recommendations may not be appropriate in all situations. Any decision by practitioners to apply these guidelines must be made in light of local resources and individual patient circumstances. From 1 Professor and Chair, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Director, UAB Diabetes Research Center, GRECC Investigator & Staff Physician, Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; 2 Director, Metabolic Support, Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division (...) School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology, New Haven, Connecticut; 7 Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Diabetes Obesity & Metabolic Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; 8 Assistant Clinical Professor, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, ProHealth Care Associates, Division of Endocrinology, Lake Success, New York; 9 Center for Weight Management, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California. Address

2016 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

138. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update

they were analyzed and used to prepare standardized extracts that were incorporated into the British and American pharmacopoeias of recognized drugs and medicinal preparations, leading to the wide use of cannabis in medical practice in many parts of the world. In the 20 th century, however, the medical use of cannabis gradually decreased because of its unreliability, which resulted from the variable composition of the extracts and their limited shelf life. Cannabis was largely replaced by purified (...) for a broad audience, including health professionals, policy makers and researchers. 1 5Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids 2 Background After alcohol, cannabis (also referred to as marijuana), is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2013 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use Survey (CTADS), 10.6% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2015), virtually unchanged from 10.2

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

139. Trends in intravenous drug abuse as reflected in national hepatitis reporting. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Trends in intravenous drug abuse as reflected in national hepatitis reporting. A procedure for obtaining an indicator of trends in illicit intravenous (I.V.) drug use-a form of drug use which is very harmful and difficult to measure-has been developed using national hepatitis surveillance data. Hepatitis reports are separated into two groups: one containing mostly cases related to transmission via I.V. drug use and the other containing cases related to transmission via personal contact (...) and blood transfusion. The analysis of ten years of national hepatitis reporting (1966 to 1975) shows an almost ten-fold rise in drug-related hepatitis cases from 1966 to 1972. In the last three years the number of cases has declined but remains substantially greater than the pre-epidemic levels. The rise in I.V. drug-related cases began in the 1960's among minority groups living in the center cities of the East and West Coasts and spread during the 1970's into the suburbs of these cities

1976 American Journal of Public Health

140. Skin and Soft Tissue Polymicrobial Infections From Intravenous Abuse of Drugs Full Text available with Trip Pro

Skin and Soft Tissue Polymicrobial Infections From Intravenous Abuse of Drugs Skin and soft tissue infections were studied in 21 seriously ill narcotic addicts who had been admitted to hospital. Subcutaneous abscesses were present in 14 patients; cellulitis was noted in 3, pyomyositis in 2 and necrotizing fasciitis in 2. In four patients there was septicemia. Infections in 14 patients (66.6 percent) were associated with anaerobic bacteria, which were the exclusive isolates in 6 patients (...) aerobic isolates were Klebsiella (five) and Enterobacter (four) species. When clinical features or the Gram stain of pus suggest that anaerobic bacteria may be present, antibiotic therapy should be directed against both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria until culture results are available.

1979 Western Journal of Medicine

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