How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

29,491 results for

Intravenous Drug Abuse

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Infected pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug abusers: Ligation or reconstruction? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Infected pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug abusers: Ligation or reconstruction? Infected pseudoaneurysm in intravenous (IV) drug abusers is a serious clinical problem, with difficult and controversial management. With existing controversies regarding their optimal management, we present the results of simple ligation and local debridement for treatment of infected pseudoaneurysms.Records of 72 consecutive patients with pseudoaneurysms in IV drug abusers over the last 20 years were reviewed

2014 International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research

102. Septic Arthritis in Intravenous Drug Abusers: A Historical Comparison of Habits and Pathogens. (Abstract)

Septic Arthritis in Intravenous Drug Abusers: A Historical Comparison of Habits and Pathogens. Intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) is a common problem; there were more than 16 million users worldwide in 2008. Numerous reports highlight the infectious skeletal complication associated with IVDA.To determine septic arthritis pathogens in IVDA in a U.S. hospital and compare the current causative organisms to a cohort from the 1980s at the same institution.An institutional review board-approved

2014 Journal of Emergency Medicine

103. Abuse Potential of Intravenous Oxycodone/Naloxone Solution in Nondependent Recreational Drug Users. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Abuse Potential of Intravenous Oxycodone/Naloxone Solution in Nondependent Recreational Drug Users. Abuse of opioid analgesics has become a public health issue. Some opioid abusers use intravenous administration to increase the magnitude of positive reinforcing effects. Intravenous co-administration of oxycodone with naloxone, an opioid antagonist, may reduce these rewarding effects and discourage abuse. A 2:1 oxycodone:naloxone (OXN) tablet formulation has been studied in the USA (...) compared among treatments.Pharmacokinetics were similar between OXY and sOXN. Subjects reported significantly fewer rewarding effects with sOXN compared with OXY; differences between sOXN and placebo were generally not significant. sOXN was well tolerated.Significant reductions in drug liking and other subjective effects following administration of sOXN compared with OXY indicate that naloxone concentrations were sufficient to antagonize the effects of oxycodone when abused by the intravenous route

2014 Clinical drug investigation Controlled trial quality: uncertain

104. Arteriovenous fistula of the groin in a drug abuser with endocarditis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Arteriovenous fistula of the groin in a drug abuser with endocarditis Intravenous drug abusers commonly develop endocarditis due to injection of particulate matter that can cause endothelial damage to the valves. The frequent need to access the venous system can result in vascular traumas with potential complications including arteriovenous (AV) fistulas. Here, we present the case of an intravenous drug abuser with endocarditis and an unusually large AV fistula in the groin. The patient

2016 Journal of surgical case reports

105. A tale of 2 ADFs: differences in the effectiveness of abuse-deterrent formulations of oxymorphone and oxycodone extended-release drugs. (Abstract)

A tale of 2 ADFs: differences in the effectiveness of abuse-deterrent formulations of oxymorphone and oxycodone extended-release drugs. The introduction of extended-release opioid analgesics helped initiate an epidemic of prescription opioid abuse in the United States. To make access to the drug by crushing or dissolution more difficult, abuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs) of OxyContin (Purdue Pharma, Stamford, CT) and Opana ER (Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., Malvern, PA), which use the same (...) with insufflation (78%-28.8%) and intravenous injection of the active drug (42.7%-21.4%). However, although the Opana ER ADF was effective in reducing insufflation (80%-37.1%), injection (60.0%-51.4%), and overall nonoral abuse (94.3%-77.1%), it showed no significant decrease over time. Bearing in mind that the Opana ER sample was smaller in size than that for OxyContin, our results nonetheless suggest disparate outcomes resulting from the introduction of the ADFs, which could indicate that an ADF's

2016 Pain

106. A new drug with a nasty bite: A case of krokodil-induced skin necrosis in an intravenous drug user Full Text available with Trip Pro

C Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. eng Case Reports 2016 04 22 United States JAAD Case Rep 101665210 2352-5126 desomorphine intravenous drug abuse krokodil substance abuse ulceration wound healing 2016 5 26 6 0 2016 5 26 6 0 2016 5 26 6 1 epublish 27222881 10.1016/j.jdcr.2016.02.007 S2352-5126(16)00023-0 PMC4864092 Foot (Edinb). 2015 Jun;25(2):114-9 26001995 J Addict Dis. 2012;31(4):407-12 23244560 JAMA Dermatol. 2015 Jan;151(1):32 25587682 (...) A new drug with a nasty bite: A case of krokodil-induced skin necrosis in an intravenous drug user 27222881 2016 05 25 2019 02 26 2352-5126 2 2 2016 Mar JAAD case reports JAAD Case Rep A new drug with a nasty bite: A case of krokodil-induced skin necrosis in an intravenous drug user. 174-6 10.1016/j.jdcr.2016.02.007 Haskin Alessandra A Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC. Kim Noori N Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Aguh Crystal

2016 JAAD Case Reports

107. A Study to Evaluate the Drug-Drug Interactions Between Morphine and Orally or IV Administered Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen in Healthy Subjects Study Start Date : February 2016 Actual Primary Completion Date : March 2016 Actual Study Completion Date : May 2016 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Oral acetaminophen Four doses of 1,000 mg oral APAP (2 tablets, 500 mg/tablet), Q6h, Dose 2 and 3 are co-administered with IV morphine Drug: Acetaminophen (APAP) tablets Drug: IV morphine Experimental: IV (...) ), hepatitis B (surface antigen), or hepatitis C virus antibody at screening. Subject has a history of any drug allergy, hypersensitivity, or intolerance to acetaminophen or morphine/opioids or to any of the excipients in the IV or oral formulations used. Subject has an oxygen saturation of less than 95% while awake at screening and check-in. Subject has a positive test result for drugs of abuse (minimum: opioids, barbiturates, cannabinoids, benzodiazepines, cocaine, amphetamine) or alcohol

2016 Clinical Trials

108. Seven-day intensive cognitive therapy for PTSD is as effective as weekly cognitive therapy and more effective than weekly supportive therapy Full Text available with Trip Pro

traumas (eg, childhood sexual abuse, military trauma) is an important next step. Finally, testing this treatment as a complement or follow-up to treatment for substance abuse could inform efforts to treat patients with co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorders. Could these results change your practices and why? These results are unlikely to change my everyday cognitive-behavioral practice, as the schedule for intensive therapy would not be feasible for me or some of my patients. However (...) supportive therapy. Am J Psychiatry 2014;171:294–304. Patients/participants One hundred and twenty-one adults (aged 18–65 years) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Setting National Health Service clinics in South London and Oxford, UK; 2003–2008. Intervention Three different therapeutic interventions: a 7-day intensive cognitive therapy intervention (n=30); 3 months of standard

2015 Evidence-Based Mental Health

109. Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Well?Being of Women who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

physical or psychological violence are 15 times more likely to abuse alcohol and 9 times more likely to abuse drugs than non‐abused women ( ). There is also evidence that alcohol and drug abuse in some women is directly attributable to intimate partner abuse ( ; ). 1.1.4 The impact of intimate partner abuse on health service usage Women experiencing intimate partner abuse present to health services very frequently and require wide‐ranging medical services ( ; ; ). They are admitted to hospital more (...) Questionnaire, DSQ; ) 5. Birth outcomes (self‐reported or documented in medical records) Psychosocial health 1. Post‐traumatic stress (measures such as Impact of Events scale, or IES; ) 2. Self efficacy (measures such as General Self Efficacy Scale, or GSES; ) 3. Self esteem (measures such as Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, or SES; ) 4. Perceived social support (measures such as Sarason's Social Support Questionnaire, or SSQ; ) 5. Alcohol or drug abuse (measures such as Addiction Severity Index, or ASI; ) 6

2016 Campbell Collaboration

110. Acetylfentanyl: An Emerging Drug of Abuse. (Abstract)

, and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 6. He responded to serial doses of intravenous naloxone with improvement in his mental status and respiratory condition. Due to the need for repeated dosing, he was placed on a naloxone infusion and recovered uneventfully in intensive care. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Complications from emerging drugs of abuse, like acetylfentanyl, frequently present first to emergency departments. Prompt recognition and treatment can help avoid morbidity (...) Acetylfentanyl: An Emerging Drug of Abuse. Opioid analgesics are widely used in health care, yet have significant potential for abuse. High doses are associated with potentially fatal respiratory depression, which caused 21,314 deaths in the United States in 2011. Acetylfentanyl, a synthetic opioid agonist closely related to fentanyl, recently emerged as a drug of abuse linked to numerous deaths in North America.A 36-year-old male developed the habit of using a propylene glycol electronic

2015 Journal of Emergency Medicine

111. Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. Despite the growing prevalence of prescription opioid dependence, longitudinal studies have not examined long-term treatment response. The current study examined outcomes over 42 months in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS).POATS was a multi-site clinical trial lasting up to 9 months, examining different durations of buprenorphine-naloxone plus (...) standard medical management for prescription opioid dependence, with participants randomized to receive or not receive additional opioid drug counseling. A subset of participants (N=375 of 653) enrolled in a follow-up study. Telephone interviews were administered approximately 18, 30, and 42 months after main-trial enrollment. Comparison of baseline characteristics by follow-up participation suggested few differences.At Month 42, much improvement was seen: 31.7% were abstinent from opioids

2015 Drug and alcohol dependence Controlled trial quality: uncertain

112. Pharmacologic and Nonpharmacologic Therapies in Adult Patients With Exacerbation of COPD

2019 ii Key Messages Purpose of Review To evaluate the effectiveness and harms of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Key Messages • Antibiotic therapy increases the clinical cure rate and reduces the clinical failure rate. • Oral and intravenous corticosteroids improve dyspnea and reduce the clinical failure rate. • Antibiotics and corticosteroids are not associated with increase in serious adverse events. • The evidence (...) therapy increases the clinical cure rate and reduces the clinical failure rate regardless of the severity of ECOPD (moderate SOE). There is insufficient evidence to support a particular antibiotic regimen. Oral and intravenous corticosteroids improve dyspnea and reduce the clinical failure rate (low SOE). Despite the ubiquitous use of inhaled bronchodilators in ECOPD, we found only a small number of trials that assessed lung function tests, and not final health outcomes. The evidence is insufficient

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

113. School?based Education Programmes for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

mental illness, parental alcohol or drug dependency, and young maternal age ( ; ; ). Girls appear to be more likely to be sexually abused by family members and boys by non‐family members ( ). The time of greatest vulnerability for child sexual abuse is between 7 and 12 years of age ( ). 1.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE INTERVENTION This review focuses on the most widely used strategy for the prevention of child sexual abuse: the provision of school‐based programmes. Some terms commonly used to describe (...) ( ), comprehensive approaches to child sexual abuse would involve multiple “prevention targets”, including (i) offenders and potential offenders, (ii) children and adolescents, (iii) situations, and (iv) communities ( , p 47). Although not yet rigorously researched, it appears that school‐based programmes may also work to enhance community capacity for sexual abuse prevention by raising awareness and delivering information to multiple members of children's social systems ( ), via provision of information

2015 Campbell Collaboration

114. Yoga for the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Depression, and Substance Abuse

to considerable impairments in the functioning of individuals worldwide. In Canada, the lifetime prevalence rate of PTSD, GAD, depression and substance abuse is 8%, 1 9%, 2 11%(major depressive episode) 2 and 22%(substance use disorder). 2 The first-line treatment for mental health disorders is often a combination of pharmacological and psychological therapies such as antidepressants and/or cognitive behavioural therapy. 3,4 Not all patients have adequate responses to pharmacological treatment. Patients may (...) for the use of yoga as an intervention for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, and substance abuse? Yoga for the Treatment of Adults with PTSD, GAD, Depression, or Substance Abuse 2 KEY FINDINGS There is evidence to suggest that yoga may be beneficial as a monotherapy or adjunctive therapy for treating depression. The effectiveness of yoga for treating PTSD is unclear. One observational study found that a SKY yoga training course was effective

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

115. HIV and STI testing among Indigenous women and women who inject drugs

* or intravenous drug use* or Indigenous or Aboriginal or Native American* or First Nation* or Metis or Inuit or native Canadian* or American Indian) or MeSH terms (Substance Abuse, Intravenous or Needle-Exchange Programs or Needle Sharing or Indians, North American)] AND [text terms (HIV or Hepatitis C or Sexually Transmitted or Sexually Transmitted or sexual health) or MeSH terms (Sexually Transmitted Diseases or Sexually Transmitted Infections)] AND [text terms (women or female* adj5 inject* or female* adj5 (...) . Health Care for Women International 2006 Septem- ber;27(8):723-47. 6. Kyle TL, Horigian VE, Tross S, Gru- ber V A, Pereyra M, Mandler RN et al. Uptake of HIV testing in substance use disorder treatment programs that offer on-site testing. AIDS & Behavior 2015 March;19(3):536-42. 7. Miller CL, Pearce ME, Moniruzzaman A, Thomas V , Christian W , Schechter MT et al. The Cedar Project: risk factors for transition to injection drug use among young, urban Aboriginal people. CMAJ Canadian Medical

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

116. Engaging law enforcement in harm reduction programs for people who inject drugs

predominantly exist around the purchase, possession and exchange of needles, in addition to access to addictions treatment or substitute therapy programs. At the micro-level, policing practices such as arrest for drug and injecting equipment possession, confiscation of syringes, and proximity to harm reduction services, can directly influence behaviour, perceptions, and health outcomes in people who inject drugs (5) and have been shown to increase risk taking behaviours and negatively affect health outcomes (...) with the law in encounters with people who inject drugs Rather than arresting people who inject drugs or confiscating injection equipment, law enforcement officials are encouraged to use discretion and refer individuals to appropriate community resources (18). Encouraging people who use drugs to access clean needles, opioid substitute therapies, safe injection sites, and health and supportive social services, allows these individuals to meet their basic needs, reduce injection-related harm and support

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

117. British Association for Psychopharmacology consensus guidance on the use of psychotropic medication preconception, in pregnancy and postpartum

of Pharmaceutical Science, King’s College London, London, UK 25 Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK 26 University of Manchester, Manchester, UK 27 UK Teratology Information Service, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 28 Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK Corresponding author: R H McAllister-Williams, Academic Psychiatry, Wolfson Research Centre, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE4 5PL (...) in pregnancy owing to the difficulties of conducting randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this area. As a result, it is usually necessary to extrapolate from population data regarding the efficacy of medications in specific disorders generally. The reader is directed to relevant BAP and NICE guidelines regarding these. Similarly, there are limited data on the risks of stopping medication specifically in the perinatal period. Again, there is a need to extrapolate data from the more general use of drugs

2017 British Association for Psychopharmacology

118. The effect of mental health issues on sexual risk behaviours and antiretroviral medication adherence among men who have sex with men

who have sex with men may experience chronic stress within their social environments (2;3). Negative experiences such as stigma, discrimination, internalized homophobia and violence adversely affect the psychological health of men who have sex with men (2;3;6;24;25), leading to depression (21;23), generalized anxiety disorder (23;26), posttraumatic stress disorder (4), and non- medicinal or recreational drug use (27;28). Addressing gay men’s mental health issues can reduce sexual risk taking (...) found a significant relationship between the number of syndemic conditions (e.g. depression, substance use, violence, sexual stigma, homelessness) and unprotected anal intercourse (9). Men who have sex with men who reported three or more syndemic factors (n=185) were twice as likely to engage in unprotected anal intercourse than men who reported none (aOR=2.03, 95% CI=1.43-2.89; P<.001). 27. Cochran SD, Ackerman D, Mays VM, Ross MW . Prevalence of non- medical drug use and dependence among

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

119. Cotton Fever: An Evanescent Process Mimicking Sepsis in an Intravenous Drug Abuser. (Abstract)

Cotton Fever: An Evanescent Process Mimicking Sepsis in an Intravenous Drug Abuser. Although many complications of intravenous drug abuse are well described, "cotton fever" has had little mention in recent medical literature. Cotton fever is street terminology for the post-injection fever experienced by many drug users after "shooting up" with heroin reclaimed from a previously used cotton filter.We report on a 22-year-old man with a history of intravenous drug abuse with fever 30 min after

2013 Journal of Emergency Medicine

120. Drugs to avoid in 2015

; prioritisation of the supporting data based on the strength of evidence; comparison with standard treatments; and an analysis of both known and potential adverse effects. ? This 2015 review of medications examined in these pages over a five- year period, from 2010 to 2014, identi- fied 71 drugs that are more harmful than beneficial in all their authorised indications. ? Other drugs with a better harm- benefit balance are available in most cases (when drug therapy is really necessary), but sometimes (...) there is no satisfactory medical treatment. However, even in serious situations there is no justification for exposing patients to a risk of severe adverse effects by prescribing a drug with no proven clinical efficacy. Some of these drugs may be worth testing in clinical trials, but patients enrolled in such studies must be aware that the harms and benefits they may experience are uncertain and that the main reason for their participation is to advance med- ical knowledge. Tailored supportive care is the best option

2015 Prescrire

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>