How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

8,040 results for

Intravenous Drug Abuse

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

61. Acetylfentanyl: An Emerging Drug of Abuse. (PubMed)

, and a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 6. He responded to serial doses of intravenous naloxone with improvement in his mental status and respiratory condition. Due to the need for repeated dosing, he was placed on a naloxone infusion and recovered uneventfully in intensive care. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Complications from emerging drugs of abuse, like acetylfentanyl, frequently present first to emergency departments. Prompt recognition and treatment can help avoid morbidity (...) Acetylfentanyl: An Emerging Drug of Abuse. Opioid analgesics are widely used in health care, yet have significant potential for abuse. High doses are associated with potentially fatal respiratory depression, which caused 21,314 deaths in the United States in 2011. Acetylfentanyl, a synthetic opioid agonist closely related to fentanyl, recently emerged as a drug of abuse linked to numerous deaths in North America.A 36-year-old male developed the habit of using a propylene glycol electronic

2015 Journal of Emergency Medicine

62. A Study to Characterize the Abuse Liability of Intravenous Oxycodone Alone or in Combination With Intravenous Naltrexone in Healthy, Non-Dependent, Recreational Opioid Users

CT.gov Call Center Pfizer More Information Go to Additional Information: Layout table for additonal information Responsible Party: Pfizer ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers: B4981002 First Posted: April 5, 2013 Last Update Posted: October 8, 2013 Last Verified: October 2013 Keywords provided by Pfizer: abuse potential abuse liability drug liking oxycodone naltrexone intravenous pharmacodynamic Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Oxycodone Naltrexone (...) A Study to Characterize the Abuse Liability of Intravenous Oxycodone Alone or in Combination With Intravenous Naltrexone in Healthy, Non-Dependent, Recreational Opioid Users A Study to Characterize the Abuse Liability of Intravenous Oxycodone Alone or in Combination With Intravenous Naltrexone in Healthy, Non-Dependent, Recreational Opioid Users - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information

2013 Clinical Trials

63. Assess the Influence of Cenobamate on the PK of Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Probe Drugs as a Means of Predicting Drug-drug Interactions

per week for females and 14 drinks per week for males within 6 months prior to screening Has current or recent history (within the past year) of alcohol or drug abuse or dependence Any clinically significant illness in the previous 30 days prior to screening Use of any enzyme-modifying drugs, including strong inhibitors of CYP enzymes (such as cimetidine, fluoxetine, quinidine, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, fluconazole, ketoconazole, diltiazem, and HIV antivirals) and strong inducers of CYP enzymes (...) allergies Positive urine screen for alcohol and/or drugs of abuse at screening and at each admission Positive test results for HIV-1/HIV-2 Antibodies, Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) or Hepatitis C Antibody (HCVAb) at screening Has been administered any investigational drug 30 days (or 6 times its terminal half-live) prior to Day 1 of this study Females with a positive pregnancy test at screening, regardless of child-bearing potential prior to Day 1 of this study Blood donation (excluding plasma

2017 Clinical Trials

64. Abuse and Misuse Potential of Pregabalin: A Review of the Clinical Evidence

drug and alcohol abusers found that pregabalin and diazepam differentiated from placebo consistently and suggested that pregabalin had a potential for euphorigenic activity in susceptible populations. 5 Therefore, pregabalin was scheduled by the US Drug Enforcement Administration under the Controlled Substances Act as a Schedule V drug, indicating that it had abuse potential. 5 In Canada, it was listed under schedule F, as a ‘prescription drug’. 6 Considering that pregabalin’s positive psychic (...) effects were limited and did not continue with time or continued drug use in some clinical trials, and that withdrawal effects of pregabalin were less severe than those with substances currently controlled in Schedule IV, pregabalin was not categorized in Schedule IV in the USA. 7 Although Schedule V drugs are defined as having a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs in Schedule IV, abuse of Schedule V drugs may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence. 3 The Swedish

2012 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

65. Finding Quality Addiction Care in Canada: Drug and Alcohol Treatment Guide

Finding Quality Addiction Care in Canada: Drug and Alcohol Treatment Guide Finding Quality Addiction Care in Canada Drug and Alcohol Treatment Guide November 2017This publication has been reproduced and adapted from the Guide to Finding Quality Addiction Treatment, with permission from The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse located in New York, NY , USA. However, The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse has neither reviewed nor endorsed this guide, and the Canadian (...) Specialists (M.D.) • Psychiatrist (M.D.) • If your healthcare professional is not trained in assessing and treating addictions, he or she can refer you to a professional who is. Don’t be afraid to ask for a referral from your doctor. • Licensed/registered psychologists and counsellors (Ph.D., Psy.D., M.A., M.Sc., MMFT) • Licensed/registered social workers (B.S.W. or M.S.W.) • Licensed/registered psychotherapists or counsellors (R.C.T.) • Nurse/nurse practitioner • National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

66. Engaging law enforcement in harm reduction programs for people who inject drugs

during this period, it did not reduce local drug users’ access to health services or increase injection-related risk behavior. Other research has shown that police have helped address public order concerns by referring injection drug users 26. (26) DeBeck K, Wood E, Zhang R, Tyndall M, Montaner J, Kerr T. Police and public health partnerships: evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver’s supervised injection facility. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, & Policy 2008;3:11. 27. LEAD National Suppor (...) or needle exchange or safe injection (text term) or Harm Reduction or Needle Exchange Programs or Substance Abuse, Intravenous (MeSH terms)] AND 7 RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE | #109, AUGUST, 2016 [police or law enforce* or policing (text terms) or Police or Law Enforcement (MeSH terms)]. Search results were limited to English, and only studies conducted in high income countries and published between 1996 to April 2016 were included. Searches yielded 337 references, from which 27 studies and reports were

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

67. HIV and STI testing among Indigenous women and women who inject drugs

* or intravenous drug use* or Indigenous or Aboriginal or Native American* or First Nation* or Metis or Inuit or native Canadian* or American Indian) or MeSH terms (Substance Abuse, Intravenous or Needle-Exchange Programs or Needle Sharing or Indians, North American)] AND [text terms (HIV or Hepatitis C or Sexually Transmitted or Sexually Transmitted or sexual health) or MeSH terms (Sexually Transmitted Diseases or Sexually Transmitted Infections)] AND [text terms (women or female* adj5 inject* or female* adj5 (...) HIV and STI testing among Indigenous women and women who inject drugs RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE | #105, MAY 2016 1 Questions What programs and services have been shown to be effective in increasing HIV and STI testing among Indigenous women and women who inject drugs? References 1. Orchard TR, Druyts E, McInnes CW , Clement K, Ding E, Fernandes KA et al. Factors behind HIV testing practices among Canadian Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve. AIDS Care 2010 March;22(3):324-31. 2. Lally MA

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

68. Nephropathy in Illicit Drug Abusers: A Postmortem Analysis. (PubMed)

and patterns of drug abuse.Histopathologic alterations of the kidney.Hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, Sirius, and Congo Red stainings and immunoglobulin A immunohistochemistry of all cases; additional histochemical stainings or immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy in selected cases.Individuals were mostly white (99.2%), were male (82.2%), and had intravenous drug use (IVDU) (81.4%). Median age at death was 39 years and duration of drug abuse was 17 years. The majority (79.1%) took (...) Nephropathy in Illicit Drug Abusers: A Postmortem Analysis. Illicit drug abuse is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, but the pathogenic consequences of long-term exposure to illicit drugs and contaminants under unsterile conditions remains unclear.Case series.All deceased persons (n 5 129) who underwent forensic autopsy because of suspected connection with illicit drug abuse between January 1, 2009, and April 30, 2011, in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.Clinical characteristics

2014 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

69. Ruptured Mycotic Common Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Fatal Pulmonary Embolism after Emergency Stent-Grafting in a Drug Abuser (PubMed)

Ruptured Mycotic Common Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Fatal Pulmonary Embolism after Emergency Stent-Grafting in a Drug Abuser The rupture of a mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in an intravenous drug abuser is a limb- and life-threatening condition that necessitates emergency intervention. Emergency stent-grafting appears to be a viable, minimally invasive alternative, or a bridge, to subsequent open surgery. Caution is required in cases of suspected concomitant deep vein thrombosis (...) in order to minimize the possibility of massive pulmonary embolism during stent-grafting, perhaps by omitting stent-graft postdilation or by inserting an inferior vena cava filter first. We describe the emergency endovascular management, in a 60-year-old male intravenous drug abuser, of a ruptured mycotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, which was complicated by a fatal pulmonary embolism.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Texas Heart Institute Journal

70. Trends in intravenous drug abuse as reflected in national hepatitis reporting. (PubMed)

Trends in intravenous drug abuse as reflected in national hepatitis reporting. A procedure for obtaining an indicator of trends in illicit intravenous (I.V.) drug use-a form of drug use which is very harmful and difficult to measure-has been developed using national hepatitis surveillance data. Hepatitis reports are separated into two groups: one containing mostly cases related to transmission via I.V. drug use and the other containing cases related to transmission via personal contact (...) and blood transfusion. The analysis of ten years of national hepatitis reporting (1966 to 1975) shows an almost ten-fold rise in drug-related hepatitis cases from 1966 to 1972. In the last three years the number of cases has declined but remains substantially greater than the pre-epidemic levels. The rise in I.V. drug-related cases began in the 1960's among minority groups living in the center cities of the East and West Coasts and spread during the 1970's into the suburbs of these cities

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1976 American Journal of Public Health

71. Skin and Soft Tissue Polymicrobial Infections From Intravenous Abuse of Drugs (PubMed)

Skin and Soft Tissue Polymicrobial Infections From Intravenous Abuse of Drugs Skin and soft tissue infections were studied in 21 seriously ill narcotic addicts who had been admitted to hospital. Subcutaneous abscesses were present in 14 patients; cellulitis was noted in 3, pyomyositis in 2 and necrotizing fasciitis in 2. In four patients there was septicemia. Infections in 14 patients (66.6 percent) were associated with anaerobic bacteria, which were the exclusive isolates in 6 patients

Full Text available with Trip Pro

1979 Western Journal of Medicine

72. Single or combination therapy of staphylococcal endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers. (PubMed)

Single or combination therapy of staphylococcal endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest cause of acute endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers. In-vitro and in-vivo animal studies have found increased killing of organisms with the combination of a beta-lactam antibiotic and an aminoglycoside. These findings have created a controversy about the use of such combination therapy. We randomly treated 25 episodes of S. aureus endocarditis in intravenous drug (...) in intravenous drug abusers with S. aureus endocarditis.

1979 Annals of internal medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

73. Abuse-deterrent Opioid Formulations. (PubMed)

Abuse-deterrent Opioid Formulations. Abuse-deterrent opioid formulations have been suggested as one way to decrease the abuse, addiction, and overdose of orally prescribed opioids. Ten oral opioid formulations have received abuse-deterrent labeling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Their properties consist of physical and/or chemical means by which the pills resist manipulation and create a barrier to unintended administration, such as chewing, nasal snorting, smoking (...) , and intravenous injection. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of abuse-deterrent technology, the types of premarketing studies required for FDA approval, the pharmacology of the currently approved abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, and the evidence for and against their influence on opioid abuse. We conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to indicate that the availability of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations has altered the trajectory of opioid overdose and addiction; however

2017 Anesthesiology

74. Pharmacogenetics of Naltrexone for Stimulant Abuse

provided by (Responsible Party): Jermaine Jones, New York State Psychiatric Institute Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This investigation will be the first study assessing genetic modulation of naltrexone's NTX effects upon the abuse liability of a stimulant drug (methamphetamine). The study team will assess the ability of oral NTX to block the reinforcing and positive subjective effects of intranasal (IN) methamphetamine (30mg/70kg). This investigation could identify an important (...) Gene x Pharmacological interaction, contributing to the personalization of stimulant abuse pharmacotherapy. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Substance Use Disorders Methamphetamine Abuse Drug: Intranasal Methamphetamine Phase 2 Detailed Description: A recent meta-analysis concluded that the OPRM1 A118G SNP (rs1799971) significantly moderates the treatment efficacy of Naltrexone (NTX) in treating alcohol abuse, increasing the treatment efficacy by over 2-fold among G-allele carriers

2017 Clinical Trials

75. A Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Oxymorphone Compared to Other Mu Opioid Agonists.

analgesics. The present study is designed to examine the abuse liability of intravenous oxymorphone compared to other mu opioid agonists (oxycodone, morphine, and hydromorphone) among physically dependent opioid abusers. This inpatient study examines the reinforcing effects of oxymorphone and other mu opioid agonists using drug self-administration procedures, and assessments of subjective effects. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Opioid-use Disorder Opioid Abuse Drug: Intravenous (...) Challege Drug Phase 2 Detailed Description: Significant public health concerns have arisen from the misuse of oxymorphone, a potent mu opioid pain medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration as Opana and Opana ER. However, little is known about its abuse potential relative to other mu opioid analgesics. The present study is designed to examine the abuse liability of intravenous oxymorphone compared to other mu opioid agonists (oxycodone, morphine, and hydromorphone). A total of 20

2017 Clinical Trials

76. A Study Evaluating Drug-Drug Interaction (DDI) Between HSK3486 Injectable Emulsion and Rifampin Capsules

: HSK3486 Sequence 1: Intravenously infuse 0.4 mg/kg HSK3486 in the morning on an empty stomach. Complete infusion within 1 min. Experimental: rifampin , HSK3486 600 mg;0.4 mg/kg Drug: rifampin , HSK3486 Sequence 2: Orally take 600 mg rifampin once a day for 8 consecutive days in the morning on an empty stomach, followed by 1 min intravenous infusion of 0.4 mg/kg HSK3486 30 min later. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Peak concentration (Cmax) [ Time Frame: From the start of HSK3486 (...) ; In receipt of any one of the following medications or treatments during screening/baseline: History of drug abuse or any signs of chronic benzodiazepines use (such as insomnia, anxiety, spasms) within 3 months prior to screening, or a positive urine drug test during baseline; Participated in clinical trials involving any medications or medical devices within 3 months prior to screening, or subjects who have participated in 3 or more drug clinical trials within the past year; In receipt of rifampin within

2018 Clinical Trials

77. A Fixed-Sequence, Drug-Drug Interaction Study Between Multiple Oral Doses of Inarigivir Soproxil and a Single Oral Dose of Midazolam in Healthy Subjects

laboratory, electrocardiogram (ECG) and vital signs, as judged by the PI Willing and able to sign the ICF Exclusion Criteria: Employee of PRA or the Sponsor History of relevant drug and/or food allergies Using tobacco products within 60 days prior to the first drug administration History of alcohol abuse or drug addiction (including soft drugs like cannabis products) Positive drug and alcohol screen (opiates, methadone, cocaine, amphetamines [including ecstasy], cannabinoids, barbiturates (...) Layout table for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Midazolam Adjuvants, Anesthesia Hypnotics and Sedatives Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs Anti-Anxiety Agents Tranquilizing Agents Psychotropic Drugs Anesthetics, Intravenous Anesthetics, General Anesthetics GABA Modulators GABA Agents Neurotransmitter Agents Molecular

2018 Clinical Trials

78. A Drug-Drug Interaction Study in Healthy Volunteers of the Effects of Tucatinib

medications within 28 days prior to check in Use of tobacco- or nicotine-containing products within 28 days prior to check in History of hyperbilirubinemia History of alcoholism or drug abuse within 2 years History of regular alcohol consumption exceeding 7 drinks/week for female subjects or 14 drinks/week for male subjects Positive hepatitis panel and/or positive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn more about (...) : No Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Midazolam Itraconazole Hydroxyitraconazole Rifampin Gemfibrozil Digoxin Repaglinide Tolbutamide Adjuvants, Anesthesia Hypnotics and Sedatives Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs Anti-Anxiety Agents Tranquilizing Agents Psychotropic Drugs Anesthetics, Intravenous Anesthetics, General Anesthetics GABA Modulators GABA Agents Neurotransmitter Agents Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action Antifungal Agents Anti

2018 Clinical Trials

79. Intravenous Versus Topical Administration of Low Dose Epinephrine Plus Combined Administration of Intravenous and Topical Tranexamic Acid (TXA)for Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

of this study is to compare the blood loss of intravenous and topical administration of low dose epinephrine plus combined administration of intravenous and topical tranexamic acid for primary total knee arthroplasty. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Blood Loss Drug: Tranexamic acid (TXA) Drug: Epinephrine Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 210 participants Allocation: Randomized (...) Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Triple (Participant, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor) Primary Purpose: Treatment Study Start Date : May 2015 Estimated Primary Completion Date : July 2017 Study Completion Date : July 2017 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Intravenous epinephrine Intravenous (IV) low dose epinephrine Drug: Tranexamic acid (TXA) IV and topical administration Drug

2016 Clinical Trials

80. Integrating collaborative TB and HIV services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs

for damages arising from its use. Design by North Creative, Geneva. WHO/HTM/TB/2016.02 WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Integrating collaborative TB and HIV services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs: consolidated guidelines. 1.HIV Infections. 2.Tuberculosis. 3.Drug Users. 4.Substance Abuse, Intravenous – complications. 5.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated. 6.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. II.The End TB Strategy. ISBN 978 92 4 151022 6 (NLM (...) for people who inject drugs | Consolidated Guidelines II. Definition of key terms People who inject drugs (PWID) refers to people who inject psychotropic (or psychoactive) substances for non- medical purposes. These drugs include opioids, amphetamine-type stimulants, cocaine, hypnotics/sedatives and hallucinogens. Injection may be through intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous routes. The definition does not include people who self-inject medicines for medical purposes, or individuals who self-inject

2016 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>