How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

29,491 results for

Intravenous Drug Abuse

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

41. A developmental etiological model for drug abuse in men Full Text available with Trip Pro

A developmental etiological model for drug abuse in men We attempt to develop a relatively comprehensive structural model of risk factors for drug abuse (DA) in Swedish men that illustrates developmental and mediational processes.We examined 20 risk factors for DA in 48,369 men undergoing conscription examinations in 1969-70 followed until 2011 when 2.34% (n=1134) of them had DA ascertained in medical, criminal and pharmacy registries. Risk factors were organized into four developmental tiers (...) reflecting i) birth, ii) childhood/early adolescence, iii) late adolescence, and iv) young adulthood. Structural equational model fitting was performed using Mplus.The best fitting model explained 47.8% of the variance in DA. The most prominent predictors, in order, were: early adolescent externalizing behavior, early adult criminal behavior, early adolescent internalizing behavior, early adult unemployment, early adult alcohol use disorder, and late adolescent drug use. Two major inter-connecting

2017 Drug and alcohol dependence

42. Cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abusers without HIV infection: A new risk factor? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abusers without HIV infection: A new risk factor? Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease which has been characterized by its identified risk groups. There are many risk factors identified. We present a surprising four cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) patients in a short period of time and in one geographical area, this observation suggest that there may be a new association with IVDA and cryptococosis.

2016 Medical mycology case reports

43. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital

2016 Case reports in infectious diseases

44. Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users

Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail (...) Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government

2016 Clinical Trials

45. The effect of public health-oriented drug law reform on HIV incidence in people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico: an epidemic modelling study Full Text available with Trip Pro

in people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.In this epidemic modelling study, we used data from the El Cuete IV cohort study to develop a deterministic model of injecting and sexual HIV transmission in people who inject drugs in Tijuana between 2012 and 2030. The population was stratified by sex, incarceration status, syringe confiscation by the police, HIV stage, and exposure to drug treatment or rehabilitation (either opioid agonist treatment or compulsory drug abstinence programmes). We modelled (...) on the HIV epidemic among people who inject drugs in Tijuana. However, appropriate implementation could markedly reduce HIV incidence if linked to opioid agonist treatment. Unfortunately, compulsory drug abstinence programmes are the main type of drug rehabilitation available and their expansion could potentially increase HIV transmission.National Institute on Drug Abuse, UC San Diego Center for AIDS Research.Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under

2018 The Lancet. Public health

46. A Study of Aleglitazar in Monotherapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Who Are Drug-Naïve to Anti-Hyperglycemic Therapy

, Doubleblind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Study to Assess the Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of Aleglitazar Monotherapy Compared With Placebo in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2D) Who Are Drug-Naïve to Antihyperglycemic Therapy Study Start Date : June 2013 Actual Primary Completion Date : November 2013 Actual Study Completion Date : November 2013 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental (...) A Study of Aleglitazar in Monotherapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Who Are Drug-Naïve to Anti-Hyperglycemic Therapy A Study of Aleglitazar in Monotherapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Who Are Drug-Naïve to Anti-Hyperglycemic Therapy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have

2013 Clinical Trials

47. A Study Of RoActemra/Actemra (Tocilizumab) in Tocilizumab-Naive Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis With Inadequate Response to Non-Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) or Biologic Therapy

immunodeficiency disorder Active cancer, or cancer diagnosed within the previous 10 years (except basal and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin or carcinoma in situ of the cervix uteri that has been excised or cured), or breast cancer diagnosed within the previous 20 years History of alcohol, drug, or chemical abuse within 1 year prior to Screening Neuropathies or other conditions that might interfere with pain evaluation Contacts and Locations Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine To learn (...) A Study Of RoActemra/Actemra (Tocilizumab) in Tocilizumab-Naive Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis With Inadequate Response to Non-Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) or Biologic Therapy A Study of Tocilizumab (RoActemra) in Tocilizumab-Naive Participants With Rheumatoid Arthritis and Inadequate Response to Non-Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Biologic Therapy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers

2013 Clinical Trials

48. Preventing and Managing Infectious Diseases Among People who Inject Drugs in Ontario

who inject drugs o This element could include efforts to prevent or help people to stop injecting drugs, efforts to reduce the risk of infection (e.g., needle-exchange programs, safe consumption/injection sites, and opioid analgesic therapy) and enhancing education efforts for people who inject drugs (e.g., to minimize risk of infectious diseases, identify early symptoms of infectious diseases, and know where to seek treatment when needed). o Generally, the evidence for this element supported (...) the use of educational approaches and harm-reduction approaches such as needle-exchange programs, opiate substitution and safe consumption sites to reduce the risk and transmission of infectious diseases and, in select cases, to reduce injection drug use more generally. • Element 2 – Enhance the infection-management capacity of community points of contacts for people who inject drugs o This element could include providing ‘low-barrier’ access points for comprehensive medical services for infectious

2019 McMaster Health Forum

49. Sexualized drug use (chemsex and methamphetamine) and men who have sex with men

to develop anhedonia, which is the inability to feel pleasure (42). A synthetic drug, methamphetamine can be manufactured using a variety of starting materials and methods (42), such as inexpensive over-the-counter medications (46). The final product can be purchased as tablets, rock-like chunks (48), or as a powder that can be easily dissolved in water or alcohol (46); hence, it can be administered through oral, nasal, or intravenous routes (47). After smoking or injecting the substance into a vein (...) use and sexual health-related outcomes, such as engaging in condomless anal intercourse or having sex while under the influence of drugs. Authors grouped the 28 studies into three categories: pharmacological (n=5), psychosocial (n=22), and harm reduction (n=1). A selection of interventions in each of these categories is described below. Pharmacological There have been no clinical trials demonstrating that a single medication can specifically counter the effects of methamphetamine (64). However

2019 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

50. Drug-Induced Liver Injury

andpathologicalphenotypesandthecurrentabsenceofspeci?c biomarkers. This makes the diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury an uncertain process, requiring a high degree of aware- ness of the condition and the careful exclusion of alternative aetiologies of liver disease. Idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity can be severe, leading to a particularly serious variety of acute liver failure for which no effective therapy has yet been developed. These Clinical Practice Guidelines summarize the available evi- dence on risk factors, diagnosis, management and risk (...) . Clinical trials produce reliable information about the devel- opment of abnormal liver biochemistries and DILI if the inci- dence is high. However, such trials usually include a limited number of patients and are therefore underpowered to detect rare adverse effects such as idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Conse- quently,themajorityofdataareprovidedbyretrospectivestud- ies of databases from pharmacovigilance centres and/or pharmaceutical companies, aimed to determine the most fre- quently associated drugs

2019 European Association for the Study of the Liver

51. Emergency Department Out of Hours Discharge Medications

(commissioned by the Department of Health) identified that “Where patients’ clinical needs are such that treatment should start without delay, they will need to be able to access the medicines they need at the same time and the same place as their out-of-hours consultation.” 5 Emergency Department Out of Hours Discharge Medications, April 2019 Considerations TTO Cupboard space Space in EDs is at a premium, therefore careful selection of which drugs and what quantities are stocked, should be taken when (...) is negligible with more expensive drugs. Prescribers should prescribe medicines generically (to minimise cost) unless there is a clinical / efficacy / safety reason not to e.g. patients taking anti-epileptics such as carbamazepine should be maintained on the same brand. ED staff should have access to FP10s without overly burdensome bureaucratic steps. Treating them as per a controlled drug is a reasonable measure. 7 Emergency Department Out of Hours Discharge Medications, April 2019 FP10s should be stored

2019 Royal College of Emergency Medicine

52. European Academy of Neurology guideline on the management of medication-overuse headache

with the most appropriate pro- gram that applies to their clinical condition and the overused drug(s) and should receive preventive treatment with drugs of proven e?cacy. ? Patients with MOH who do not respond to preventive therapy should undergo drug withdrawal. Drug intake can be abruptly terminated or restricted in patients overusing simple anal- gesics, ergots or triptan medication. In patients with long-last- ing abuse of opioids, barbiturates or tranquilizers, slow tapering of these drugs (...) medication. In patients with long-lasting abuse of opioids, barbi- turates or tranquilizers, slow tapering of these drugs is recommended. Withdrawal can be performed on an outpatient basis or in a daycare or inpatient setting. Introduction The frequent and regular intake of drugs to treat acute headache episodes, e.g. migraine attacks in patients with primary headache disorders, can result in an increase in headache frequency and ?nally lead to chronic headache. This condition is called medication

2020 European Academy of Neurology

53. Needle embolism in intravenous drug abuse Full Text available with Trip Pro

Needle embolism in intravenous drug abuse Although intravenous drug users report the breaking of a needle as a relatively common occurrence, central embolism of needle fragments occurs infrequently in the literature. Central needle embolism also poses a conundrum for the radiologist, as the needle may be easily overlooked when the clinical history is nonspecific. We present two cases of needle embolism to the lung, one complicated by inflammatory mass and progressive pleuritic chest pain

2015 Radiology Case Reports

54. Are There Tools to Screen Children and Adolescents in the Emergency Department With Mental Health and Substance Abuse Issues?

Michael P. Wilson, MD, PhD Rawle A. Seupaul, MD Department of Emergency Medicine University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, AR Results Table 1. Helpful ED screening tools. Positive LR Negative LR Sensitivity, % (95% CI) Speci?city, % (95% CI) HEADS-ED 6.3 0.21 82 (NR) 87 (NR) ASQ 2.8 0.04 98 (91.7–99.7) 66 (55.2–75.0) DSM-IV 8.8 0.13 88 (NR) 90 (NR) LR, Likelihood ratio; CI, con?dence interval; NR, not reported; ASQ, Ask Suicide-Screening Questions. The HEADS-ED tool is used to predict (...) . Finally, the DSM-IV 2-item instru- ment to evaluate pediatric alcohol use disorders was found to be highly accurate in ruling in or out alcohol abuse disorders (Figure 3). Adolescents who answered yes to any one of the 2 items were 8 times more likely to have an alcohol use disorder. The psychometric properties of these tools are encouraging. However, from an evidence-based medicine perspective, none of these clinical decision instruments have been shown to improve out- comes in large, high-quality

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

55. Single-Question Drug Abuse Screening Test

Single-Question Drug Abuse Screening Test Single-Question Drug Abuse Screening Test Aka: Single-Question Drug Abuse Screening Test , DAS-1 II. Indications Screening III. Criteria: Question How many times in the past year have you Used an illegal drug or Used a prescription medication for a non-medical purpose (e.g. feeling that the medical caused) IV. Interpretation Positive Screening answer of 1 time or greater Consider reflexing a positive answer to complete the ( ) V. Efficacy : 90-100% : 74% VI (...) . References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Single-Question Drug Abuse Screening Test." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Examination About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started in 1995, this collection now contains 6656 interlinked

2018 FP Notebook

56. Drug Abuse Screening Test

Abuse Screening Test Aka: Drug Abuse Screening Test , DAS-10 II. Indications Suspected or Positive ( ) III. Criteria: Ten yes-or-no questions Have you used drugs other than those required for medical reasons? Do you use more than one drug at a time? Are you always able to stop using drugs when you want to? Have you ever had blackouts or flashbacks as a result of drug use? Do you feel bad or guilty about your drug use? Do your spouse (or parents) ever complain about your involvement with drugs? Have (...) you neglected your family because of your use of drugs? Have you engaged in illegal activities to obtain drugs? Have you ever experienced withdrawal symptoms (felt sick) when you stopped taking drugs? Have you had medical problems as a result of your drug use (e.g. memory loss, hepatitis, s or bleeding)? IV. Scoring Assign 1 point for a "NO" answer to the third question ("...able to stop using drugs") Assign 1 point for all other "YES" answers V. Interpretation Score: 0 Low risk Score 1-3 Moderate

2018 FP Notebook

57. Adolescent Drug Abuse

absenteeism Increased doctor visit frequency IV. Causes: Common Illicit Drugs in Adolescents Cannabinoids ( , K2, Spice) Most common drug of abuse in U.S. and progressively increasing annually among grades 8-12 s (e.g. , , ) Non-medical use of prescription s (10% ages 12-18 years old) (e.g. ) Over-the-counter pharmaceuticals ( ic effects) Unintentional associated agent toxicity High risk of (due to combination agent abuse, e.g. ) Risk of in OTC compounds containing (e.g. Coricidin) Stimulants (e.g (...) Adolescent Drug Abuse Adolescent Drug Abuse Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Adolescent Drug Abuse Adolescent Drug

2018 FP Notebook

58. Bacterial Spinal Epidural and Psoas Abscess in Pregnancy Associated with Intravenous Drug Use Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bacterial Spinal Epidural and Psoas Abscess in Pregnancy Associated with Intravenous Drug Use Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection of the central nervous system. We report a case of a 25-year-old G3 P0020 at 36 weeks of gestational age with history of intravenous drug abuse presenting with acute-onset and severe back pain. Despite antibiotic therapy, pain worsened and she developed lower extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an SEA, and cesarean (...) delivery was performed secondary to increasing weakness, followed by laminectomy (T9-12) and decompression of epidural abscess. Postoperative course was complicated by a psoas muscle abscess and persistent SEA refractory to antibiotic therapy, requiring surgical reexploration and extended treatment with antibiotics. She was discharged home in stable condition and neonate did well with no resulting sequelae. Spinal epidural and psoas abscesses are rare and diagnosis is often delayed. Prompt recognition

2018 Case reports in obstetrics and gynecology

59. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with a history of intravenous drug use. (Abstract)

with relevant key terms and various synonyms.HIV infection may be associated with pulmonary hypertension due to indirect consequences of viral infection, venous thromboembolism, or its therapies. Anti-retroviral infection may also influence plasma concentrations of commonly used treatments for pulmonary hypertension. Intravenous drug use is acknowledged as an important portal for the acquisition of hepatitis virus C infection, with portopulmonary hypertension a potential complication associated with poor (...) prognosis. Interferon based therapy, used in treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection may also play a casual role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. More recently, sofosbuvir has been linked to development or exacerbation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Certain drugs of abuse may cause pulmonary hypertension due to properties that result in direct injury to the pulmonary vasculature. The potential for embolic phenomena, complicating venous thromboembolism, recurrent embolization

2018 Current medical research and opinion

60. Effectiveness of alcohol and other drug interventions in at-risk Aboriginal youth

drug use OR cannabis smoking OR marijuana OR opioids OR opiates OR heroin OR methadone OR inhalant abuse OR gasoline OR petroleum OR petrol sniffing OR amphetamine OR methamphetamine OR stimulants OR psychoactive drugs OR hallucinogens OR designer drugs OR street drugs OR pharmaceutical drug misuse 4. intervention OR counselling OR prevention OR treatment OR support OR therapy OR health care access OR referral OR program* OR policy OR policies OR social services OR family health OR rehabilitation (...) Shakeshaft. 2 1. Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research, School of Health, Medical & Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University 2. National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales June 2017 © Sax Institute 2017 This work is copyright. It may be reproduced in whole or in part for study training purposes subject to the inclusions of an acknowledgement of the source. It may not be reproduced for commercial usage or sale. Reproduction for purposes other than those indicated

2018 Sax Institute Evidence Check

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>