How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

8,080 results for

Intravenous Drug Abuse

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Evaluation of tricuspid valve repair without annuloplasty ring in Intravenous drug abusers. (Abstract)

Evaluation of tricuspid valve repair without annuloplasty ring in Intravenous drug abusers. Tricuspid valve endocarditis among intravenous drug abusers is increasing in prevalence in modern societies. The increased risk of reinfection in such patients makes surgical reintervention a risky decision. Repair is preferred over replacement to minimize the presence of foreign material in a potentially infected field.A retrospective, observational, comparative, non-randomized study included all living (...) patients presenting with isolated tricuspid valve endocarditis due to IV drug abuse who had undergone tricuspid valve intervention in the form of repair or replacement. Two hundred twenty-three patients were operated on between January 2014 and January 2016; 128 patients underwent tricuspid valve replacement (replacement group n = 128), and 95 patients underwent tricuspid valve repair (repair group n = 95).Before hospital discharge, 87 patients of the repair group had mild TR, and eight patients had

2019 Annals of Thoracic Surgery

2. Comparison between intravenous morphine versus fentanyl in acute pain relief in drug abusers with acute limb traumatic injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparison between intravenous morphine versus fentanyl in acute pain relief in drug abusers with acute limb traumatic injury. Rapid and effective pain relief in acute traumatic limb injuries (ATLI) is one of the most important roles of emergency physicians. In these situations, opioid addiction is an important concern because of the dependency on opioids. The study aims to compare the effectiveness of intravenous (IV) fentanyl versus morphine in reducing pain in patients with opioid addiction (...) effects, vital signs and patients' satisfaction between the two groups.Fentanyl might be an effective and safe drug in opioid addicts suffering from ATLI.

2019 World journal of emergency medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Bilateral Pneumothoraces: A Rare Complication of Septic Pulmonary Emboli in Intravenous Drug Abusers Full Text available with Trip Pro

Bilateral Pneumothoraces: A Rare Complication of Septic Pulmonary Emboli in Intravenous Drug Abusers BACKGROUND Right-sided infective endocarditis is a classic complication of intravenous drug abuse. Without timely bactericidal antibiotics, the disease process can progress to septic pulmonary emboli. Rarely, a pneumothorax can occur as a result of the emboli, and progressive persistent valvular disease may require a valve replacement. Tricuspid valve replacement has a high morbidity rate even (...) in stable patients. CASE REPORT We present a case of tricuspid valve replacement in a 39-year-old man with peripheral intravenous drug abuse who had bilateral pneumothoraces secondary to septic pulmonary emboli originating on large tricuspid valve infected vegetations. The patient died 21 days after the valve replacement. CONCLUSIONS Tricuspid valve replacement is an especially dangerous procedure in intravenous drug abusers who present with bilateral pneumothoraces and advanced cardiopulmonary

2018 The American journal of case reports

4. Mycobacterium mucogenicum Hand Infection in an Intravenous Drug Abuser Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mycobacterium mucogenicum Hand Infection in an Intravenous Drug Abuser Mycobacterium mucogenicum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found ubiquitously in water sources. It has been reported to cause widespread infections with infection entry from wound or central venous catheters especially in immunocompromised patients. Diagnosis is made from blood cultures which may take at least a week. Management includes removal of the source or drainage of wound infections and combination antimicrobial

2018 Case reports in infectious diseases

5. Infective Endocarditis Associated with Atrial Septal Defect in an Intravenous Drug Abuser: A Case Report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Infective Endocarditis Associated with Atrial Septal Defect in an Intravenous Drug Abuser: A Case Report Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital abnormality, which accounts for 20-40% of all the adult patients with congenital heart diseases. Due to the slow velocity of shunt flow, ASD has a negligible risk for infective endocarditis (IE). However, intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) is a potential cause for IE. IE remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Our case report demonstrates (...) , follow-up, along with rehabilitation measures, should be taken for patients with a history of drug abuse in order to prevent the risk of reinfection.

2018 Cureus

6. Abuse deterrence testing: A dose ratio escalation study examining naloxone coadministered with intravenous hydromorphone in non-treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent drug users. (Abstract)

Abuse deterrence testing: A dose ratio escalation study examining naloxone coadministered with intravenous hydromorphone in non-treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent drug users. To assess the reduction in intravenous (IV) abuse potential of hydromorphone from different dose ratio combinations with naloxone in opioid-dependent drug users.Randomized, blinded, dose ratio escalation study.Single center.Following conversion to a stable IV dose of hydromorphone, 12 non-treatment-seeking, opioid (...) -dependent subjects were randomly assigned and received at least one dose of study drug; seven subjects received all five study treatments. Five subjects withdrew early from the treatment phase: adverse events (2) and participant decision (3).Participants underwent a dose-selection phase to stabilize on an individualized hydromorphone dose. Stable subjects were dosed intravenously on 5 consecutive days. The dose received was one of five hydromorphone/naloxone dose ratios that included the combination

2018 Journal of opioid management Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. Intravenous Opioid Drug Abuse as an Independent Risk Factor for Supraglottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Case Control Study. (Abstract)

Intravenous Opioid Drug Abuse as an Independent Risk Factor for Supraglottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Case Control Study. Intravenous opioid drug abuse (IVDA) was previously correlated with laryngeal cancer. However, discrimination of this correlation by anatomical subsites has not yet been described. In this study, we aim to further establish the association between IVDA and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and to indicate the laryngeal subsites that are predisposed (...) was 10.846 (95% CI: 1.3-89.4).Intravenous opioid drug abuse represents an independent risk factor for SG-SCC. The pathogenesis should be investigated not just as a risk factor, as opioids are commonly used for pain management in oncologic patients.© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

2017 Clinical Otolaryngology

8. An Outbreak of Endogenous Fungal Endophthalmitis Among Intravenous Drug Abusers in New England. Full Text available with Trip Pro

An Outbreak of Endogenous Fungal Endophthalmitis Among Intravenous Drug Abusers in New England. Intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) is a known risk factor for endogenous fungal endophthalmitis (EFE), a severe intraocular infection caused by hematogenous seeding of mycotic organisms to the eye. Reporting significant increases in heroin-related deaths since 2014, the New England region is in the midst of an opioid crisis that has led to a substantial increase in patients at risk for this vision (...) -threatening disease.To present an update on characteristics, management, and visual outcomes in patients with EFE.Medical records review was initiated on July 1, 2016, evaluating all patients with EFE referred to New England Eye Center at Tufts Medical Center, a tertiary care ophthalmology practice distributed throughout Massachusetts, from May 1, 2014, to May 1, 2016. Patients with a history of IVDA and culture-proven or clinical evidence of fungal endophthalmitis were included.Intravenous drug

2017 JAMA ophthalmology

9. Intravenous Drug Abuse

Intravenous Drug Abuse Intravenous Drug Abuse Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Intravenous Drug Abuse Intravenous Drug (...) Abuse Aka: Intravenous Drug Abuse , Persons Who Inject Drugs , Intravenous Drug User , Injection Drug Abuse , IV Drug Abuse , IVDA , PWID From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology : 750,000 current injection drug users in U.S. (2014) Adults in U.S. who have used IV Drugs: 2% (or 6.5 Million) Mortality while actively injecting drugs: 2.6 per 100 person years III. Causes Most commonly abused IV drugs Other s abused via injection IV. Exam See See Observe for injection sites Localized or pigmentation

2019 FP Notebook

10. Iris abscess a rare presentation of intravenous drug abuse associated Candida endophthalmitis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Iris abscess a rare presentation of intravenous drug abuse associated Candida endophthalmitis To describe an unusual case of intravenous drug abuse associated endogenous endophthalmitis presenting with an iris abscess.A 30-year old female with history of intravenous drug use presented with a two-week history of redness and blurry vision in the right eye. An initial diagnosis of anterior uveitis was made. However, she worsened on topical steroids and mydriatics. She was found to have a hypopyon (...) albicans, and she received voriconazole. This led to resolution of the condition with a final visual acuity of 20/20 at six month follow up.An iris abscess is a rare clinical presentation of intravenous drug use-associated endogenous endophthalmitis and as a result may present a diagnostic challenge as it requires a high level of clinical suspicion and a detailed social history to elicit the drug abuse. Early diagnosis and aggressive therapy is the key to better visual outcomes in these patients.

2016 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

11. Central nervous system fungal infection in a young male with a history of intravenous drug abuse and hepatitis C Full Text available with Trip Pro

Central nervous system fungal infection in a young male with a history of intravenous drug abuse and hepatitis C A young male, with a known history of hepatitis C and heroin abuse, was admitted to the emergency department with altered sensorium, left-sided weakness, and no meningeal signs. Initial computed tomography imaging showed hypodensity involving right basal ganglia with mass effect but no hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple nonenhancing small foci of restricted (...) diffusion involving the right basal ganglia, T2 and FLAIR hyperintensity within the right basal ganglia, and internal capsule with mild surrounding edema. The patient was treated for encephalitis and atypical stroke given the history of intravenous drug abuse. Follow-up imaging showed worsening of the brain lesions, with involvement of the contralateral basal ganglia with necrosis and peripheral enhancement. Brain biopsy was ultimately performed and suggested infection with Aspergillus species

2017 Radiology Case Reports

12. Management options in the treatment of femoral pseudoaneurysms secondary to intravenous drug abuse: A case series Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management options in the treatment of femoral pseudoaneurysms secondary to intravenous drug abuse: A case series Infected femoral pseudoaneurysms are a common presentation in intravenous drug users with little consensus as to the optimum management of these patients. Whilst emergency revascularisation options are available, excision and ligation of the femoral artery remains the most common operative intervention but risks leaving the patient with critical ischaemia or intermittent

2017 International journal of surgery case reports

13. Cardiac Arrest Following Drug Abuse with Intravenous Tapentadol: Case Report and Literature Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cardiac Arrest Following Drug Abuse with Intravenous Tapentadol: Case Report and Literature Review BACKGROUND Tapentadol is a centrally acting opioid analgesic, with a dual mode of action, as a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and an agonist of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Tapentadol is used for the management of musculoskeletal pain, and neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old woman attended hospital for evaluation of an intractable headache (...) . Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were negative. She was found unresponsive in the bathroom on the day following hospital admission, and despite resuscitative measures, the patient died following cardiac arrest. Autopsy toxicology revealed significantly elevated levels of tapentadol, and bedside evidence suggested that the patient had self-administered this medication intravenously before her death. CONCLUSIONS We report a rare adverse effect of tapentadol causing

2017 The American journal of case reports

14. An Invasive Case of Left-Sided Endocarditis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with History of Intravenous Drug Abuse Full Text available with Trip Pro

An Invasive Case of Left-Sided Endocarditis Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Patient with History of Intravenous Drug Abuse Infective endocarditis, caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is rarely seen in clinical practice. It has been reported mainly in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA). We present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and fever. Computed tomography (CT) abdomen showed splenic and renal infarct. The blood culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa

2017 Cureus

15. Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence

is often from a family with more than 2 children, is the youngest child, and has signs of previous and concurrent trauma, as well as emotional abuse 8 20Best Practices Guidelines for Trauma Center Recognition: Child Abuse z The victim is more likely to have a single parent, a mother with lower level of education, lower family income, no paternal involvement, parental unemployment, higher rates of parental alcohol and drug abuse, and live with family members other than biologic parents 9 z A strong (...) Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence ACS TRAUMA QUALITY PROGRAMS BEST PRACTICES GUIDELINES FOR TRAUMA CENTER RECOGNITION OF Child Abuse, Elder Abuse, and Intimate Partner Violence Released November 2019Table of Contents Introduction 4 Best Practices Guidelines for Trauma Center Recognition: Child Abuse 5 1. Overview 6 2. Assessment 9 a. Clinical Screening 9 b. History 14 c. Bruising and Oral Injuries 16 d. Burns 20 e. Abusive Head Trauma 22 f. Eye Findings in Abusive Head

2019 American College of Surgeons

16. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Secondary to Intravenous Abuse of Opana® ER Full Text available with Trip Pro

Thrombotic Microangiopathy Secondary to Intravenous Abuse of Opana® ER Opana ER (oxymorphone) is an opioid drug available throughout the United States, and intravenous abuse of the crushed oral formulation has been associated with drug-induced thrombotic microangiopathy. In this abstract, we describe two young patients who lived together and used Opana ER intravenously. Both presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia that mimicked thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Treating (...) this condition poses a clinical challenge, as it is difficult to distinguish it from TTP. The role for plasma exchange is not clear but can be used while awaiting the results of the ADAMTS-13 activity, but ultimately supportive care with drug discontinuation is the recommended therapy of choice. Patients should be counseled against Opana ER's intravenous use, and users should be offered drug rehabilitation therapy.

2017 Case reports in hematology

17. Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users

Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail (...) Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Crossover Study to Evaluate the Abuse Potential of Intranasal Esketamine Compared to Racemic Intravenous Ketamine in Nondependent, Recreational Drug Users The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government

2016 Clinical Trials

18. Cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abusers without HIV infection: A new risk factor? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abusers without HIV infection: A new risk factor? Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease which has been characterized by its identified risk groups. There are many risk factors identified. We present a surprising four cases of disseminated cryptococcosis in intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) patients in a short period of time and in one geographical area, this observation suggest that there may be a new association with IVDA and cryptococosis.

2016 Medical mycology case reports

19. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital

2016 Case reports in infectious diseases

20. Needle embolism in intravenous drug abuse Full Text available with Trip Pro

Needle embolism in intravenous drug abuse Although intravenous drug users report the breaking of a needle as a relatively common occurrence, central embolism of needle fragments occurs infrequently in the literature. Central needle embolism also poses a conundrum for the radiologist, as the needle may be easily overlooked when the clinical history is nonspecific. We present two cases of needle embolism to the lung, one complicated by inflammatory mass and progressive pleuritic chest pain

2015 Radiology Case Reports

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>