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Intrauterine Device

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121. Postplacental intrauterine device expulsion by 12 weeks: A prospective cohort study. (Abstract)

Postplacental intrauterine device expulsion by 12 weeks: A prospective cohort study. An intrauterine device placed immediately following a delivery can serve as an effective and safe contraceptive strategy in the postpartum period. There is limited evidence that the levonorgestrel intrauterine system may have a higher rate of expulsion compared to the copper intrauterine device; however, rates of expulsion for these 2 intrauterine device types have not been compared directly.We sought (...) to compare expulsion rates by 12 weeks' postpartum for the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and copper intrauterine device.We enrolled women who received postplacental intrauterine devices at 2 urban hospitals. Eligible women were ≥18 years old, English- or Spanish-speaking, with singleton vaginal delivery at ≥35 weeks' gestation. Intrauterine devices were inserted within 10 minutes of placental delivery by trained providers using ring forceps or the operator's hand. Intrauterine device location

2017 American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

122. Treatment of Low-Risk Endometrial Cancer and Complex Atypical Hyperplasia With the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of Low-Risk Endometrial Cancer and Complex Atypical Hyperplasia With the Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device. To assess efficacy of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) for treatment of complex atypical hyperplasia or low-grade endometrial cancer.This retrospective case series included all patients treated with the LNG-IUD for complex atypical hyperplasia or early-grade endometrial cancer from January 2003 to June 2013. Response rates were calculated

2017 Obstetrics and Gynecology

123. Uterine perforation by intrauterine devices: a 16-year review. (Abstract)

Uterine perforation by intrauterine devices: a 16-year review. One of the major concerns with the insertion of intrauterine devices is uterine perforation. Though uncommon, it can be debilitating and result in failure of the device. In this article we review uterine perforation with intrauterine contraception (IUC) in a community clinic in the UK over a 16-year period.We prospectively collected data on uterine perforations for the years 2000-2015, reviewed associated factors and calculated (...) limits. Twenty-eight of the perforations were in parous women, 87% of whom were within 18 weeks of delivery, peaking at 13 weeks postpartum. Twenty of these were in breastfeeding women. In 3/28 cases for which we have outcome data the device was adherent to or had perforated either the bladder or bowel.Our perforation rate is consistent with other studies. Most of our perforations were within 18 weeks of childbirth, earlier than in a recent major study. We cannot tell from our data if there is a true

2017 Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

124. Frequency of 6-week follow-up appointment scheduling after intrauterine device insertion. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Frequency of 6-week follow-up appointment scheduling after intrauterine device insertion. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is widely recommended to reduce unintended pregnancy in the USA. As intrauterine device (IUD) use increases, evaluating the role of post-insertion follow-up is important.A retrospective patient record review was conducted to assess the follow-up experience of women who had an IUD placed at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1 January to 30 June 2015

2017 Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

125. Six-week retention after post-placental copper intrauterine device placement. (Abstract)

Six-week retention after post-placental copper intrauterine device placement. We sought to evaluate the 6-week clinical outcomes (intrauterine device [IUD] retention, recognized expulsions, ability to visualize or palpate strings, and need for ultrasound evaluation) in women who received a TCu380A postplacental IUD (PPIUD) after vaginal (VD) or cesarean delivery (CD).We conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine the 6-week retention of TCu380A IUDs placed within 10 min of placental

2017 Contraception

126. Social media and the intrauterine device: a YouTube content analysis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Social media and the intrauterine device: a YouTube content analysis. YouTube's online archive of video testimonials related to health information are more commonly viewed than those developed by clinicians and professional groups, suggesting the importance of the patient experience to viewers. We specifically sought to examine the accuracy of information on, and projected acceptability of, the intrauterine device (IUD) from these YouTube testimonials.We searched YouTube for videos about (...) individual uploaders' IUD experiences, using the search terms 'intrauterine device', 'IUD', 'Mirena' and 'Paragard'. Given interest in user testimonials, we excluded professional and instructional videos belonging to commercial or non-profit entities. Two reviewers independently analysed the videos using a structured guide, with attention to inaccurate information.Of 86 identified videos, four videos featured clinicians and were excluded; 62 met inclusion criteria. Interrater agreement on IUD portrayal

2017 Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care

127. Anticipated Pain as a Predictor of Discomfort with Intrauterine Device Placement. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Anticipated Pain as a Predictor of Discomfort with Intrauterine Device Placement. Intrauterine devices have been gaining popularity for the past 2 decades. Current data report that >10% of women who use contraception are using an intrauterine device. With <1% failure rates, the intrauterine device is one of the most effective forms of long-acting reversible contraception, yet evidence shows that fear of pain during intrauterine device placement deters women from choosing an intrauterine device (...) as their contraceptive method.The objective of this analysis was to estimate the association between anticipated pain with intrauterine device placement and experienced pain. We also assessed other factors associated with increased discomfort during intrauterine device placement. We hypothesized that patients with higher levels of anticipated pain would report a higher level of discomfort during placement.We performed a secondary analysis of the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. There were 9256 patients enrolled

2017 American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

128. Practice Bulletin No. 186: Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices. (Abstract)

Practice Bulletin No. 186: Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, also called long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), are the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. The major advantage of LARC compared with other reversible contraceptive methods is that they do not require ongoing effort on the part of the patient for long-term and effective use. In addition, after the device is removed

2017 Obstetrics and Gynecology

129. Women's experiences with immediate postpartum intrauterine device insertion: A mixed methods study. (Abstract)

Women's experiences with immediate postpartum intrauterine device insertion: A mixed methods study. To describe women's pain and experiences with immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion (IPPI) following vaginal delivery using a ring forceps insertion technique.This observational mixed-methods study included women who underwent successful IPPI using ring forceps, with and without epidural analgesia. To describe women's pain during the procedure, we recruited women during

2017 Contraception

130. Practice Bulletin No. 186 Summary: Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices. (Abstract)

Practice Bulletin No. 186 Summary: Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, also called long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), are the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. The major advantage of LARC compared with other reversible contraceptive methods is that they do not require ongoing effort on the part of the patient for long-term and effective use. In addition, after the device is removed

2017 Obstetrics and Gynecology

131. Society of Family Planning Guidelines: Postplacental insertion of intrauterine devices. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Society of Family Planning Guidelines: Postplacental insertion of intrauterine devices. Postplacental intrauterine device (IUD) placement, defined as IUD placement within 10 min after delivery of the placenta, is an appealing strategy for increasing access to postpartum IUDs because it does not require a separate postpartum visit. These guidelines present an evidence-based assessment of postplacental IUD placement after vaginal and cesarean delivery. Postplacental IUD insertion is safe and does

2017 Contraception

132. Vesical transmigration of an intrauterine contraceptive device: A rare case report and literature review. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vesical transmigration of an intrauterine contraceptive device: A rare case report and literature review. Displacement of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is a rare and serious complication of IUD insertion. Theoretically, it can migrate to anywhere in the pelvic and abdominal cavity. However, it is not usual for an IUD to migrate to the bladder.In this case report, we reported a patient with chronic urinary symptoms caused by the migration of an IUD into the bladder. The displacement

2017 Medicine

133. New developments in intrauterine device use: focus on the US Full Text available with Trip Pro

New developments in intrauterine device use: focus on the US Many more women in the US today rely upon intrauterine devices (IUDs) than in the past. This increased utilization may have substantially contributed to the decline in the percentage of unintended pregnancies in the US. Evidence-based practices have increased the number of women who are medically eligible for IUDs and have enabled more rapid access to the methods. Many women enjoy freedom to use IUDs without cost, but for many

2016 Open access journal of contraception

134. Visibility of Strings After Postplacental Intracesarean Insertion of CuT380A and Cu375 Intrauterine Contraceptive Device: A Randomized Comparative Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Visibility of Strings After Postplacental Intracesarean Insertion of CuT380A and Cu375 Intrauterine Contraceptive Device: A Randomized Comparative Study To compare the incidence of visible strings after postplacental intracesarean insertion of Cu375 and CuT380A intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUD).This was a prospective, randomized comparative study. A total of 100 women fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent postplacental intracesarean insertion of either Cu375 IUD

2017 Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology of India Controlled trial quality: uncertain

135. Women’s willingness and ability to feel the strings of their intrauterine device Full Text available with Trip Pro

Women’s willingness and ability to feel the strings of their intrauterine device To determine how many intrauterine device (IUD) users are willing and able to palpate their IUD strings.A cross-sectional survey was conducted among IUD users presenting for their 6-week follow-up visit after insertion at the University of Hawaii, USA, between January 2011 and January 2012. Participants were asked whether they had previously felt the strings and whether they were willing to do so during the visit

2017 International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics

136. Abdominal and pelvic actinomycosis due to longstanding intrauterine device: a slow and devastating infection Full Text available with Trip Pro

Abdominal and pelvic actinomycosis due to longstanding intrauterine device: a slow and devastating infection Actinomycosis is a chronic or subacute bacterial infection characterized by large abscess formation, caused mainly by the gram-positive non-acid-fast, anaerobic, or microaerophilic/capnophilic, obligate parasites bacteria from the Actinomyces genus. Although pelvic inflammatory disease is an entity associated with the longstanding use of intrauterine devices (IUDs), actinomycosis

2017 Autopsy & Case Reports

137. Intra-cesarean insertion and fixation of frameless intrauterine devices Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intra-cesarean insertion and fixation of frameless intrauterine devices Various contraceptive methods are available to postpartum women including hormonal and nonhormonal barriers, as well as injectable forms. Of all the available birth control methods, intrauterine devices (IUD) are felt by many to be the near-ideal form of contraception, and are recommended by advocacy groups, physicians, and gynecological organizations worldwide. Immediate postpartum IUD insertion deserves greater attention

2017 Turkish Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

138. Intrauterine devices and risk of uterine perforation: current perspectives Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intrauterine devices and risk of uterine perforation: current perspectives Uterine perforation is an uncommon complication of intrauterine device insertion, with an incidence of one in 1,000 insertions. Perforation may be complete, with the device totally in the abdominal cavity, or partial, with the device to varying degrees within the uterine wall. Some studies show a positive association between lactation and perforation, but a causal relationship has not been established. Very rarely (...) , a device may perforate into bowel or the urinary tract. Perforated intrauterine devices can generally be removed successfully at laparoscopy.

2016 Open access journal of contraception

139. Intrauterine device embedded in omentum of postpartum patient with a markedly retroverted uterus: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intrauterine device embedded in omentum of postpartum patient with a markedly retroverted uterus: a case report The intrauterine device is a popular form of long-acting reversible contraception. Although generally safe, one of the most serious complications of intrauterine device use is uterine perforation. Risk factors for perforation include position of the uterus, force exerted during intrauterine device insertion, postpartum period, and breastfeeding. This case is important and needs (...) to be reported because it highlights the need to assess risk factors for uterine perforation. It adds to the medical literature because it examines the relationship between position of the uterus and the location of uterine perforation. This case report is unusual in that it describes the mechanism and specific location of uterine perforation in relation to the position of the uterus.We present a case of an intrauterine device found in the omentum of a 30-year-old white postpartum woman with a significantly

2017 Journal of medical case reports

140. Pelvic abscess complicating sigmoid colon perforation by migrating intrauterine device: A case report and review of the literature Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pelvic abscess complicating sigmoid colon perforation by migrating intrauterine device: A case report and review of the literature Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are commonly used as a contraceptive method. However, they may cause rare but potentially serious complications such as migration through the uterine wall and gastrointestinal perforation.We report a case of a 26-year woman, carrying an IUD for 2 years, who presented to the emergency with pelvic pain with breakthrough bleeding. Abdominal (...) imaging revealed the presence of two devices the first of which was located in the uterine cavity and the other in the wall of the sigmoid colon associated with a 5-centimeter pelvic collection. Intraoperatively, the IUD was found to be embedded in the wall of the sigmoid colon which was removed by wedge resection of the involved segment followed by a closure of the puncture with drainage.The Intrauterine Device (IUD) is an effective method of contraception, relatively well tolerated, reversible

2017 International journal of surgery case reports

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