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Intrauterine Device

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2. Intrauterine Devices and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Safety

Intrauterine Devices and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Safety Intrauterine Devices and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Intrauterine Devices and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Safety Intrauterine Devices and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Safety Published on: March 28, 2017 Project Number: RB1074-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety (...) of patients with intrauterine devices using magnetic resonance imaging? Key Message No relevant literature was identified regarding the safety of patients with intrauterine devices using magnetic resonance imaging. Tags copper, intrauterine devices, intrauterine devices, copper, magnetic resonance imaging, imaging, IUD, Intrauterine, metal, Adverse, safe, MRI, MRIs, Magnetic resonance imaging Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : March 28, 2017 Related Content Follow us: © 2019 Canadian

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

3. Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices

Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices e130 VOL. 131, NO. 5, MAY 2018 OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices ABSTRACT: The phenomenon of adolescent childbearing is complex and far reaching, affecting not only the adolescents but also their children and their community. The prevalence and public health effect of adolescent pregnancy reflect complex structural social problems (...) and an unmet need for acceptable and effective contra- ceptive methods in this population. In 2006–2010, 82% of adolescents at risk of unintended pregnancy were currently using contraception, but only 59% used a highly effective method, including any hormonal method or intrauterine device. Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) have higher efficacy, higher continuation rates, and higher satisfaction rates compared with short-acting contraceptives among adolescents who choose to use them

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

4. Use of intrauterine devices in nulliparous women

Use of intrauterine devices in nulliparous women Clinical Guidelines Use of intrauterine devices in nulliparous women Patricia A. Lohr a, ? , Richard Lyus b , Sarah Prager c a British Pregnancy Advisory Service, 20 Timothy's Bridge Road, Stratford Enterprise Park, Stratford on Avon, Warwickshire, CV37 9BF b Homerton University Hospital, London c University of Washington Received 18 August 2017; accepted 23 August 2017 Abstract Five intrauterine devices (IUDs) are available in the United States (...) : four levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems (two containing 52 mg, one containing 19.5 mg and one containing 13.5 mg) and one copper-bearing device (Copper T 380A). All IUDs have very low typical- use failure rates and high acceptability ratings, yet they are used by a minority of women, with nulliparous women less likely to do so than parous women. The objective of this clinical review is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of IUDs in nulliparous women

2017 Society of Family Planning

5. Postplacental insertion of intrauterine devices

Postplacental insertion of intrauterine devices Review article Society of Family Planning Guidelines: Postplacental insertion of intrauterine devices Amy K. Whitaker a, ? , Beatrice A. Chen b a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Chicago, 5842 S. Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637, USA b Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Received 3 June 2017; revised 27 (...) for the postpartum visit are most likely to benefit from provision of postplacental IUD placement with appropriate counseling about risks and benefits. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Postpartum contraception; Intrauterine device; Intrauterine system; Contraception; Levonorgestrel; Postplacental IUD; Postpartum IUD; IUD expulsion 1. Background Intrauterine device (IUD) placement within 10 min after delivery of the placenta is an appealing strategy for increasing access to postpartum IUDs

2017 Society of Family Planning

6. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices

Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices - ACOG Menu ▼ Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices Page Navigation ▼ Number 186, November 2017 (Replaces Practice Bulletin Number 121, July 2011) Committee on Practice Bulletins—Gynecology . This Practice Bulletin was developed by the Committee on Practice Bulletins—Gynecology and the Long-Acting Reversible (...) , incurred in connection with this publication or reliance on the information presented. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, also called long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), are the most effective reversible contraceptive methods. The major advantage of LARC compared with other reversible contraceptive methods is that they do not require ongoing effort on the part of the patient for long-term and effective use

2017 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

7. Intrauterine mepivacaine instillation for pain relief during intrauterine device insertion in nulliparous women: a double-blind randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Intrauterine mepivacaine instillation for pain relief during intrauterine device insertion in nulliparous women: a double-blind randomized controlled trial. To evaluate whether intrauterine mepivacaine instillation before intrauterine device (IUD) insertion decreases pain compared to placebo.We performed a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing mepivacaine 1%, 10ml versus 0.9% NaCl intrauterine instillation using a hydrosonography catheter 5min before IUD insertion in women (...) insertion was 4.8cm in the intervention group (n=41, IQR=3.1-5.8) and 5.9cm in the placebo group (n=40, IQR=3.3-7.5, p=.062). In the per protocol analysis, the median VAS with IUD insertion was 4.8cm (IQR=3.1-5.5) and 6.0cm (IQR=3.4-7.6) for the intervention and placebo groups respectively (p=.033). More women in the intervention group reported the procedure as easier than expected (n=26, 63.4% vs. n=15, 37.5%) and fewer reported it as worse than expected (n=3, 7.3% vs. n=14, 35%, p=.006).Intrauterine

2019 Contraception

8. Self-administered vaginal lidocaine gel for pain management with intrauterine device insertion: a blinded, randomized controlled trial

Self-administered vaginal lidocaine gel for pain management with intrauterine device insertion: a blinded, randomized controlled trial A major barrier to intrauterine device use is fear of pain during insertion. Trials exploring analgesic interventions for intrauterine device insertion have yielded mixed results, and no standardized pain management guidelines currently exist for this procedure. In an abortion-related study, self-administered lidocaine gel over a prolonged time interval showed (...) promise as a method of pain control.The objective of the study was to assess pain control with intrauterine device insertion after patient-administered lidocaine gel compared with placebo.We conducted a randomized, blinded trial of women undergoing levonorgestrel or copper intrauterine device insertion in an outpatient gynecology clinic between July 2016 and April 2017. Participants self-administered either 20 mL of 2% lidocaine gel or placebo gel vaginally at least 15 minutes prior to intrauterine

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia. (Full text)

Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia. Postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PP-IUCD) are one type of post-partum family planning method, which can be provided to a post-partum woman starting from the placental delivery time (within 10 minutes), or within the first 48 hours of postpartum period. In most developing countries, delivery time is the primary opportunity for women (...) to access post-partum family planning methods, especially for those living in remote areas. Hence, this study assesses providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device service provision.A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Amhara region health center and hospitals. Health providers surveyed included obstetricians, gynecologists, general practitioners, emergency surgical officers, health officers, midwives and nurses from September 18, 2015 to December18, 2016

2019 PLoS ONE PubMed

10. Bleeding pattern difference between levonorgestrel-intrauterine system and copper-intrauterine devices inserted immediately post-abortion: a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study in Chinese women. (PubMed)

Bleeding pattern difference between levonorgestrel-intrauterine system and copper-intrauterine devices inserted immediately post-abortion: a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study in Chinese women. To describe the bleeding pattern (primary outcome), side effects, treatment satisfaction and 6 month continuity rates associated with the 52 mg levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and the copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) inserted immediately after abortion.This multicenter

2018 Current medical research and opinion

11. Interventions for pain with intrauterine device insertion. (Full text)

Interventions for pain with intrauterine device insertion. Fear of pain during insertion of intrauterine contraception (IUC) is a barrier to use of this method. IUC includes copper-containing intrauterine devices and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems. Interventions for pain control during IUC insertion include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), local cervical anesthetics, and cervical ripening agents such as misoprostol.To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs

2015 Cochrane PubMed

12. Immediate postpartum insertion of intrauterine device for contraception. (Full text)

Immediate postpartum insertion of intrauterine device for contraception. Women who want to start intrauterine contraception (IUC) during the postpartum period might benefit from IUC insertion immediately after delivery. Postplacental insertion greatly reduces the risk of subsequent pregnancy and eliminates the need for a return visit to start contraception. Without the option of immediate insertion, many women may never return for services or may adopt less effective contraception.Our aim (...) sensitivity analysis included trials with sufficient outcome data and moderate or high quality evidence. Four newer trials comparing insertion times met the inclusion criteria. Two studies used the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) after vaginal delivery. The other two trials placed IUC after cesarean section; one used the CuT 380A intrauterine device (IUD) and the other used the LNG-IUS.A pilot trial compared immediate insertion versus early or standard insertion. In groups comparing

2015 Cochrane PubMed

13. Paracervical Block for Intrauterine Device Placement Among Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Paracervical Block for Intrauterine Device Placement Among Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial To investigate whether a 20-mL buffered 1% lidocaine paracervical block decreases pain during intrauterine device (IUD) placement.In a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women were assigned to receive either a 20-mL buffered 1% lidocaine paracervical block or no block before IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement measured on a 100-mm visual analog

2018 EvidenceUpdates

14. Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion and breast-feeding outcomes: a noninferiority randomized controlled trial

Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion and breast-feeding outcomes: a noninferiority randomized controlled trial Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion is increasing in frequency in the United States, but few studies have investigated the effect of early placement on breast-feeding outcomes.This study examined the effect of immediate vs delayed postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion on breast-feeding outcomes.We conducted (...) this noninferiority randomized controlled trial at the University of Utah and the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Centers from February 2014 through March 2016. Eligible women were pregnant and planned to breast-feed, spoke English or Spanish, were aged 18-40 years, and desired a levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Enrolled women were randomized 1:1 to immediate postpartum insertion or delayed insertion at 4-12 weeks' postpartum. Prespecified exclusion criteria included delivery <37.0 weeks' gestational

2018 EvidenceUpdates

15. Immediate postabortal insertion of intrauterine devices. (Full text)

Immediate postabortal insertion of intrauterine devices. Background The use of an effective contraceptive may be necessary after an abortion. Insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) may be done the same day or later. Immediate IUD insertion is an option since the woman is not pregnant, pain of insertion is less because the cervical os is open, and her motivation to use contraception may be high. However, insertion of an IUD immediately after a pregnancy ends carries risks, such as spontaneous (...) participants); the quality of evidence was moderate. Moderate quality of evidence also suggests that use and expulsion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system or CuT380A was more likely for immediate compared to delayed insertion risk ratio (RR) 1.40 (95% CI 1.24 to 1.58; 3 studies; 878 participants) and RR 2.64 ( 95% CI 1.16 to 6.00; 3 studies; 878 participants) respectively. Another trial randomised to the levonorgestrel IUD or Nova T showed discontinuation rates due to pregnancy were likely

2014 Cochrane PubMed

16. Intrauterine Device Expulsion After Postpartum Placement: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Intrauterine Device Expulsion After Postpartum Placement: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis To estimate expulsion rates among women with postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) placement by timing of insertion, IUD type, and delivery method.We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov from 1974 to May 2018.We searched databases for any published studies that examined postpartum placement of a copper IUD or levonorgestrel intrauterine system and reported counts of expulsions. We (...) with cesarean delivery (adjusted RR 5.19, 95% CI 3.85-6.99). Analysis of expulsion rates at less than 4 weeks postpartum also indicated that the levonorgestrel intrauterine system was associated with a higher risk of expulsion (adjusted RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.50-2.43) compared with CuT380A.Postpartum IUD expulsion rates vary by timing of placement, delivery method, and IUD type. These results can aid in counseling women to make an informed choice about when to initiate their IUD and to help institutions

2018 EvidenceUpdates

17. The Intrauterine Device in Women of Childbearing Age Has A Greater Long-Term Cost-Benefit than Oral Contraception Pills

The Intrauterine Device in Women of Childbearing Age Has A Greater Long-Term Cost-Benefit than Oral Contraception Pills "The Intrauterine Device in Women of Childbearing Age Has A Greater Lon" by Laura Rogers < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation Summer 8-13-2016 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies First Advisor Annjanette Sommers, PA-C, MS Rights . Abstract Unplanned pregnancy remains a major problem in the United States, despite (...) the widespread usage of contraception. Improper and inconsistent usage of short acting reversible contraception contributes to the unplanned pregnancy epidemic. Hormonal and copper intrauterine devices are safe and cost-effective alternatives, but usage in the Unites States remains low. Recommended Citation Rogers, Laura, "The Intrauterine Device in Women of Childbearing Age Has A Greater Long-Term Cost-Benefit than Oral Contraception Pills" (2016). School of Physician Assistant Studies . 554. https

2016 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

18. Endoscopic Treatment of Intrauterine Device Migration into the Bladder with Stone Formation (Full text)

Endoscopic Treatment of Intrauterine Device Migration into the Bladder with Stone Formation Background: An intrauterine device is commonly used for contraception globally. Although intrauterine device placement is an effective and safe method of contraception, migration into the bladder with stone formation is a rare and serious complication. The management approaches for an intrauterine device embedded in the bladder include endoscopic procedures and open surgical removal. In this study, we (...) report the case of a patient with recurrent urinary tract infection associated with intrauterine device migration and urolithiasis, who successfully underwent endoscopic treatment combined with laser fragmentation. Case Presentation: A 22-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a 1-month history of lower abdominal pain, hematuria, and pain on urination. Transvaginal ultrasound showed a hyperechoic lesion in the bladder. A plain abdominal radiograph showed the presence of a T-shaped intrauterine

2017 Journal of endourology case reports PubMed

19. Systemic effects of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine devices

Systemic effects of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine devices Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g

2019 PROSPERO

20. Interventions to ease intrauterine device (IUD) insertion: a systematic review

Interventions to ease intrauterine device (IUD) insertion: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

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