How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

365 results for

Intraocular Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

101. Comparison of Combigan BID Versus Simbrinza TID

Agents Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action Physiological Effects of Drugs Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists Adrenergic alpha-Agonists Adrenergic Agonists Antihypertensive Agents Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Enzyme Inhibitors (...) trial would be to assess which treatment, if either, is superior in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP). A secondary objective is to assess the tolerability of each drug. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Glaucoma Ocular Hypertension Drug: Combigan Two Times Daily (BID) Drug: Simbrinza Three Times Daily (TID) Phase 4 Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 43 participants Allocation: Randomized

2014 Clinical Trials

102. Early Aqueous Suppressant Therapy on Hypertensive Phase Following Glaucoma Drainage Device Procedure: A Randomized Prospective Trial. (PubMed)

Early Aqueous Suppressant Therapy on Hypertensive Phase Following Glaucoma Drainage Device Procedure: A Randomized Prospective Trial. To prospectively evaluate the effect of early aqueous suppression (therapy) on hypertensive phase (HP) and intraocular pressure (IOP) control after implantation of silicone Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV).Patients who underwent AGV implantation were randomized to initiate therapy (including β-blockers, α-agonists, or carbonic anhydrase inhibitors) when postoperative

2014 Journal of glaucoma Controlled trial quality: uncertain

103. Topical brinzolamide (Azopt) versus placebo in the treatment of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS). (PubMed)

Topical brinzolamide (Azopt) versus placebo in the treatment of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS). To test the hypothesis that the topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor brinzolamide (Azopt) has beneficial effects versus placebo on measures of nystagmus and visual acuity in adult subjects with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS).Prospective, cross-over, double masked clinical trial.Single centre.Five subjects ≥18 years old with typical INS and best-binocular visual acuity in their primary (...) optotype visual acuity, using the ETDRS protocol analysed individually and as a group before and after Azopt and placebo.Versus placebo and baseline measures, topical Azopt significantly improved; INS waveform characteristics in the primary position null zone, group mean values of the nystagmus acuity function across gaze (p<0.01) and group mean ETDRS binocular letter visual acuity (p<0.05). There was a predictable decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) without any systemic or ocular adverse

2014 British Journal of Ophthalmology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

104. Nonpseudophakic Cystoid Macular Edema (Overview)

reoccur in the absence of treatment. [ ] The major determinant of fluid movement in the retina is the Müller cell. Müller cells have bicarbonate-related transport mechanisms that control movement of potassium and sodium ions (and thus fluid), partly explaining the role for carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide in the treatment of cystoid macular edema. Additional routes of ion control are achieved through the Kir2.1 and Kir4.1 channels that buffer changes in intracellular potassium (...) > Nonpseudophakic Cystoid Macular Edema Updated: Sep 28, 2018 Author: Hamoon Eshraghi, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Nonpseudophakic Cystoid Macular Edema Overview Background Although the most common cause of cystoid macular edema (CME) is due to after cataract extraction or other intraocular surgery, numerous other conditions are associated with the clinical appearance of fluid-filled, cystoid spaces in the macular region. CME is a final common pathway

2014 eMedicine.com

105. Sickle Cell Disease (Follow-up)

of prophylactic exchange transfusions. Perioperative measures to reduce the incidence of anterior segment ischemia include the following: Nonsympathomimetic local anesthesia Minimization of topical sympathomimetics Supplemental oxygen for 48 hours after surgery Avoiding wide encircling scleral buckling elements, expansile concentrations of intraocular gases, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors Closely monitoring and treating elevated intraocular pressure Anterior segment ischemia after surgery is an emergency (...) anhydrase inhibitors, because they may cause further sickling and worsen the outflow obstruction. If the intraocular pressure remains elevated after a judicious trial of medical therapy, surgical intervention with an anterior chamber lavage is indicated. The goal of treatment is to eliminate existing neovascularization and, thus, to eliminate the sequelae of proliferative sickle retinopathy (PSR). Modalities to treat proliferative sickle retinopathy include diathermy, cryotherapy, xenon arc

2014 eMedicine.com

106. Sturge-Weber Syndrome (Diagnosis)

is preferable in SWS. The chance of achieving seizure control with medical therapy in patients with SWS varies. Glaucoma medications The goal of treatment is control of IOP to prevent optic nerve injury. This can be achieved with the following agents: Beta-antagonist eye drops - Decrease the production of aqueous fluid Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors - Also decrease production of aqueous fluid Adrenergic eye drops and miotic eye drops - Promote drainage of aqueous fluid Dye laser photocoagulation Treatment (...) the presence of infantile glaucoma include the following: Corneal diameter of more than 12 mm during the first year of life Corneal edema Tears in the Descemet membrane (Haab striae) Unilateral or bilateral myopic shift Optic nerve cupping greater than 0.3 Any cup asymmetry associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) above the high teens Optic nerve damage - Resulting in myopia, anisometropia, amblyopia, strabismus, and visual field defects Diagnosis In young patients, examination under anesthesia or deep

2014 eMedicine.com

107. Glaucoma, Drainage Devices (Diagnosis)

, dorzolamide/timolol) Alpha agonist/carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (eg, brimonidine/brinzolamide) Laser therapy Laser can be used as primary or adjunctive treatment. It is indicated in cases of noncompliance with medications or if the patient is on maximum tolerated medical therapy and needs further intraocular pressure reduction. The following are laser options that may be used for primary open-angle glaucoma: Argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) Micropulse diode laser (...) , brimonidine, apraclonidine) Less-selective sympathomimetics (eg, dipivefrin, epinephrine) Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, acetazolamide, methazolamide) Prostaglandin analogs (eg, latanoprost, bimatoprost, travoprost, tafluprost, latanoprostene bunod) Miotic agents (eg, pilocarpine) Hyperosmotic agents (eg, isosorbide dinitrate, mannitol, glycerin) Beta-blocker/alpha agonist combination (eg, brimonidine/timolol) Beta-blocker/carbonic anhydrase inhibitor combination (eg

2014 eMedicine.com

108. Glaucoma and Penetrating Keratoplasty (Diagnosis)

Inflammation, graft rejection, retinal detachment, subconjunctival fibrosis Topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors Induce permanent graft failure in eyes with borderline endothelial counts Prostaglandin analogues Uveitis, cystoid macular edema in aphakia and pseudophakia, and recurrent herpes simplex infection in patients with previous history of herpes Adrenergic agents Epithelial toxicity and cystoid macular edema in aphakia and pseudophakia Contributor Information and Disclosures Author Kristin Schmid (...) of the Procedure In 1969, Irvine and Kaufman reported the high incidence of increased intraocular pressure (IOP) following PKP. [ ] They reported a mean maximum pressure of 40 mm Hg in aphakic transplants and 50 mm Hg in combined transplants and cataract extraction in the immediate postoperative period. Since then, numerous authors have reported on the incidence and management of PKPG. Previous Next: Epidemiology Frequency The incidence of PKPG varies from 9-31% in the early postoperative period

2014 eMedicine.com

109. Pregnancy, Special Considerations (Treatment)

considerations. First, intense weight loss is not recommended because of risk to fetal viability. Second, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are contraindicated during pregnancy due to the potential fetal teratogenic effects. Thirdly, the use of diuretics poses the risk of electrolyte and placental blood flow changes. Reports exist of spontaneous improvement with no treatment and very close follow-up care of optic nerve function. However, with visual compromise, interventions, such as bed rest, , optic nerve (...) in mothers who are breastfeeding. [ ] However, timolol has been reported to be compatible with lactation according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, acetazolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide) are contraindicated during pregnancy because of potential teratogenic effects. They should be avoided in mothers who are breastfeeding because of the potential hepatic and renal effects to the infant. However, acetazolamide has been reported

2014 eMedicine.com

110. Synechia, Peripheral Anterior (Treatment)

. The appropriate management of peripheral anterior synechiae depends on the disease process that leads to peripheral anterior synechiae formation. The following drug categories may be considered depending on the primary diagnosis: topical beta-blockers, topical alpha-agonists, topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, topical prostaglandin analogs, miotics, cycloplegics, and topical corticosteroids. Treat intraocular pressure (IOP) as necessary. Topical alpha-agonists, beta (...) -blockers, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and prostaglandin analogs may be useful in lowering intraocular pressure in eyes with peripheral anterior synechiae. Miotics are useful in pupil block due to primary angle closure but may accentuate angle closure in posterior pushing mechanisms. Miotics or prostaglandin analogs likely will not be useful in cases where 360° peripheral anterior synechiae exist. Inflammatory states Topical steroids minimize inflammation and, therefore, peripheral anterior synechiae

2014 eMedicine.com

111. Sturge-Weber Syndrome (Treatment)

is preferable in SWS. The chance of achieving seizure control with medical therapy in patients with SWS varies. Glaucoma medications The goal of treatment is control of IOP to prevent optic nerve injury. This can be achieved with the following agents: Beta-antagonist eye drops - Decrease the production of aqueous fluid Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors - Also decrease production of aqueous fluid Adrenergic eye drops and miotic eye drops - Promote drainage of aqueous fluid Dye laser photocoagulation Treatment (...) the presence of infantile glaucoma include the following: Corneal diameter of more than 12 mm during the first year of life Corneal edema Tears in the Descemet membrane (Haab striae) Unilateral or bilateral myopic shift Optic nerve cupping greater than 0.3 Any cup asymmetry associated with intraocular pressure (IOP) above the high teens Optic nerve damage - Resulting in myopia, anisometropia, amblyopia, strabismus, and visual field defects Diagnosis In young patients, examination under anesthesia or deep

2014 eMedicine.com

112. Sturge-Weber Syndrome (Treatment)

[ , ] NA NA 32% *NA = not available Previous Next: Pharmacologic Treatment of Glaucoma The goal of treatment is control of intraocular pressure (IOP) to prevent optic nerve injury. This can be achieved with the following agents: Beta-antagonist eye drops - Decrease the production of aqueous fluid Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors - Also decrease production of aqueous fluid Adrenergic eye drops and miotic eye drops - Promote drainage of aqueous fluid Although medical treatment of SWS glaucoma usually fails (...) for long-term surgical success. Medical therapy can also be used as an adjunct to surgery. Topical antiglaucoma therapy for extended periods of time is sometimes helpful postoperatively to further reduce borderline IOP elevations without the need for reoperation. Initial medical therapy with a topical beta blocker, followed sequentially with the addition of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (systemic in infants and topical in older children) and topical prostaglandin (latanoprost [Xalatan

2014 eMedicine.com

113. Sickle Cell Disease (Treatment)

of prophylactic exchange transfusions. Perioperative measures to reduce the incidence of anterior segment ischemia include the following: Nonsympathomimetic local anesthesia Minimization of topical sympathomimetics Supplemental oxygen for 48 hours after surgery Avoiding wide encircling scleral buckling elements, expansile concentrations of intraocular gases, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors Closely monitoring and treating elevated intraocular pressure Anterior segment ischemia after surgery is an emergency (...) anhydrase inhibitors, because they may cause further sickling and worsen the outflow obstruction. If the intraocular pressure remains elevated after a judicious trial of medical therapy, surgical intervention with an anterior chamber lavage is indicated. The goal of treatment is to eliminate existing neovascularization and, thus, to eliminate the sequelae of proliferative sickle retinopathy (PSR). Modalities to treat proliferative sickle retinopathy include diathermy, cryotherapy, xenon arc

2014 eMedicine.com

114. Aniridia (Treatment)

steroid pulses Vitamin A ointments Autologous serum drops Topical bevacizumab drops have been reported in one study. [ ] Limbal stem cell transplantation The medical treatment of aniridia is directed toward control of intraocular pressure, which includes the topical use of the following: Miotics Beta-blockers Sympathomimetics Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors Prostaglandin analogues The chances of failure with local antiglaucoma treatment are high. Treatment of photophobia and nystagmus in patients (...) with aniridia is as follows: Tinted or iris contact lenses Tinted spectacle lenses Tinted intraocular lenses (IOLs) [ ] By the above measures, reducing the amplitude and frequency of nystagmus is possible. Refractive errors are treated with careful refraction and complete correction. Treatment of amblyopia and strabismus in patients with aniridia is as follows: Usually, the potential visual acuity in both eyes should be symmetrical. When the vision is unequal without structural difference, vigorous

2014 eMedicine.com

115. Aniridia in the Newborn (Treatment)

. Miotics often are tried first; they improve aqueous outflow by contracting the ciliary muscle. However, the induced myopia may not be well tolerated by young patients. Adrenergic agonists, beta-blockers, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors also may be tried, but they often are ineffective long term as the patient becomes refractory to them. Whenever a new medication is to be instituted, a trial should be performed, adding and removing only one medication at a time. Optical correction Patients (...) > Aniridia in the Newborn Treatment & Management Updated: Apr 06, 2017 Author: Sophie Bakri, MD; Chief Editor: Donny W Suh, MD, FAAP Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Aniridia in the Newborn Treatment Medical Care Medical management of glaucoma associated with aniridia Medical therapy of the glaucoma is the initial treatment of choice. It initially may be efficacious in reducing intraocular pressure, but most patients with aniridia who have glaucoma eventually require surgical therapy

2014 eMedicine.com

116. Glaucoma and Penetrating Keratoplasty (Treatment)

agents (eg, timolol, betaxolol), adrenergic agents (eg, epinephrine, dipivefrin), alpha2-adrenergic agonists (eg, brimonidine, apraclonidine hydrochloride), miotics (eg, pilocarpine, echothiophate iodide, carbachol), prostaglandin analogues (eg, latanoprost), topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, dorzolamide, brinzolamide), and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, acetazolamide, methazolamide, dichlorphenamide). Beta-adrenergic blocking agents have been the cornerstone of glaucoma (...) of the blood-aqueous barrier, and they can initiate graft rejection. In aphakic patients, miotics can increase the risk of a retinal detachment. Topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, dorzolamide, brinzolamide) have similar ocular hypotensive efficacy as betaxolol 0.5% and are not associated with clinically significant electrolyte disturbances or systemic adverse effects seen with systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. However, they should be used with caution in patients with PKPG, especially

2014 eMedicine.com

117. Glaucoma, Neovascular (Treatment)

glaucoma are recommended. Other agents include topical beta-blockers (eg, levobunolol [Betagan], timolol [Timoptic]), topical brimonidine (Alphagan), topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (eg, dorzolamide [Trusopt], brinzolamide [Azopt]), and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (eg, acetazolamide [Diamox]). Topical pilocarpine is contraindicated because it may increase inflammation. The role of topical latanoprost (Xalatan) is unclear in the treatment of early NVG. The successful use of photodynamic (...) . Medical therapy is indicated, with topical atropine and steroids being the most important agents. Antiglaucoma medications, topical beta-blockers, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are also recommended. The role of topical brimonidine and latanoprost in advanced disease is unclear. Topical pilocarpine and echothiophate iodide are contraindicated (may cause increased inflammation and hyperemia). Oral glycerol and intravenous mannitol are recommended only if IOP is elevated symptomatically. Anti-VEGF

2014 eMedicine.com

118. Glaucoma, Malignant (Treatment)

body, increasing zonular tension with flattening and posterior movement of the lens and deepening the anterior chamber. Topical phenylephrine is used to tighten the zonules by stimulating the longitudinal muscle of the ciliary body. Topical beta-blockers, alpha-adrenergic agonists, and topical and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are effective in decreasing aqueous humor production and lowering intraocular pressure, presumably decreasing aqueous misdirection. Osmotic agents used to decrease (...) vitreous volume include oral glycerol or isosorbide, or intravenous mannitol. Hyperosmotic agents are very effective in lowering intraocular pressure and have an onset of action in minutes reaching its maximum peak at 60 minutes. They should be used with caution due to possible metabolic disorders and intravascular volume overload; they are contraindicated in patients with renal or heart failure. Medical treatment works in approximately one half of patients. Medical management should be continued

2014 eMedicine.com

119. Glaucoma, Lens-Particle (Treatment)

> Lens-Particle Glaucoma Treatment & Management Updated: Aug 13, 2015 Author: Brian R Sullivan, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Lens-Particle Glaucoma Treatment Medical Care The elevated IOP of lens-particle glaucoma often responds to medical management. Topical beta-adrenergic antagonists are typical first-line agents. Topical alpha-adrenergic agonists and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are considered adjunctive agents. Be especially cautious (...) when choosing a topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor in cases involving compromised corneal endothelial function; irreversible corneal decompensation has been described in such scenarios. Prostaglandin analogues have not been tested, but exercise caution when using such agents in the postoperative period. Theoretical risks of increased inflammation and/or cystoid macular edema exist. Likewise, miotic agents may exacerbate anterior segment inflammation. In emergency management of severe acute lens

2014 eMedicine.com

120. Glaucoma, Hyphema (Treatment)

to glaucomatous optic nerve damage and central retinal artery occlusion at even slightly increased pressure. Glaucoma can be treated with topical medications (eg, beta-blockers [Timoptic bid and new generation drops]). Avoid oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, especially acetazolamide (eg, Diamox), in patients with sickle cell trait or disease. These drugs tend to increase sickling of erythrocytes. Methazolamide may be a better choice in this situation (Neptazane 50 mg PO q8h). Use hyperosmotic agents like (...) Glaucoma Treatment & Management Updated: Jul 27, 2018 Author: Inci Irak Dersu, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Hyphema Glaucoma Treatment Medical Care Treatment of microhyphemas in which the intraocular pressure (IOP) is not elevated usually involves limiting activities that cause rapid movements of the globe during the first 72 hours. Patients who have concurrent elevation of IOP may require topical and oral ocular hypotensive medications

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>