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Intranasal Cromolyn

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1. Intranasal Cromolyn

Intranasal Cromolyn Intranasal Cromolyn Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Intranasal Cromolyn Intranasal Cromolyn Aka (...) : Intranasal Cromolyn , Intranasal Mast Cell Stabilizer From Related Chapters II. Indications First line agent for children with III. Medications Nasalcrom 1 puff tid-qid intranasal IV. Efficacy Not as effective as s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Intranasal Cromolyn." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics

2018 FP Notebook

2. Allergic Rhinitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Intranasal Corticosteroids

corticosteroids (INCS) (Table 1) Note: Fluticasone is now available OTC, and is not eligible for billing the assessment fee. Drugs of choice for moderate to severe intermittent symptoms or mild persistent rhinitis. [Grade A recommendation (consistent high-quality evidence) ]. Control the four major symptoms of AR - sneezing, itching, rhinorrhea and nasal blockage - may also improve ocular symptoms. Superior to oral and intranasal antihistamines, antileukotrienes and cromolyn in relieving AR symptoms (...) Allergic Rhinitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Intranasal Corticosteroids Allergic Rhinitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Intranasal Corticosteroids - medSask Home - College of Pharmacy and Nutrition - University of Saskatchewan Toggle Menu Search the U of S Search Allergic Rhinitis - Guidelines for Prescribing Intranasal Corticosteroids An inflammatory disorder of the nose which occurs when the membranes lining the nose become sensitized to allergens. Mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE

2017 medSask

3. Intranasal Cromolyn

Intranasal Cromolyn Intranasal Cromolyn Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Intranasal Cromolyn Intranasal Cromolyn Aka (...) : Intranasal Cromolyn , Intranasal Mast Cell Stabilizer From Related Chapters II. Indications First line agent for children with III. Medications Nasalcrom 1 puff tid-qid intranasal IV. Efficacy Not as effective as s Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Intranasal Cromolyn." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics

2015 FP Notebook

4. Effects of cromolyn sodium on isolated rat's trachea (PubMed)

Effects of cromolyn sodium on isolated rat's trachea Cromolyn sodium (cromolyn) effectively inhibits both antigen- and exercise-induced asthma when used as an aerosol. Intranasal cromolyn is also recommended for preventing and treating allergic rhinitis. By inhibiting the degranulation of sensitized mast cells, cromolyn reduces the release of mediators that trigger inflammation and the allergic response. The precise pharmacologic activity of cromolyn has not been fully elucidated. This study (...) evaluated the effect of cromolyn on isolated rat's trachea. The following assessments of cromolyn were performed: (1) effect on tracheal resting tension, (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M of methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic, and (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal contractions. The results indicated cromolyn could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction when the preparation was increased to 10(-4)M. Adding cromolyn at doses of ≥10(-8) M did

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2011 Allergy & Rhinology

5. Efficacy and Safety Study of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Twice a Day (BID) Using a Novel Bi Directional Device in Subjects With Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Followed by an 8-Week Open-Label Extension Phase to

the screening visit. Inhaled corticosteroid use must be limited to stable doses of no more than 1,000 μg/day of beclomethasone (or equivalent) for at least 3 months before screening with plans to continue use throughout the study. Must be able to cease treatment with intranasal medications including, but not limited to, intranasal steroids, intranasal sodium cromolyn, nasal atropine, nasal ipratropium bromide, inhaled corticosteroids (except permitted doses listed above for comorbid asthma and COPD (...) Efficacy and Safety Study of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Twice a Day (BID) Using a Novel Bi Directional Device in Subjects With Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Followed by an 8-Week Open-Label Extension Phase to Efficacy and Safety Study of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Using a Novel Bi-directional Device - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer

2012 Clinical Trials

6. Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Twice a Day (BID) Using a Novel Bi Directional Device in Subjects With Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Followed by an 8-Week Open-Label Exte

. Must be able to cease treatment with intranasal medications including, but not limited to, intranasal steroids, intranasal sodium cromolyn, nasal atropine, nasal ipratropium bromide, inhaled corticosteroids (except permitted doses listed above for comorbid asthma and COPD) at the screening visit Must be able to cease treatment with oral and nasal decongestants and antihistamines at the screening visit Must be able to use the OptiNose device correctly; all subjects will be required to demonstrate (...) Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Twice a Day (BID) Using a Novel Bi Directional Device in Subjects With Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Followed by an 8-Week Open-Label Exte Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Intranasal Administration of 100, 200, and 400 μg of Fluticasone Propionate Twice a Day (BID) Using a Novel Bi Directional Device in Subjects With Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Followed by an 8-Week Open

2012 Clinical Trials

7. Appropriate Antibiotic Use for Acute Respiratory Tract Infection in Adults: Advice for High-Value Care From the American College of Physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

agent ( , ). Although the IDSA recommendation is based on concern for antibiotic resistance, specifically ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis , no direct evidence suggests that amoxicillin–clavulanate is superior. Adjunctive therapy, such as intranasal saline irrigation or intranasal corticosteroids, has been shown to alleviate symptoms and potentially decrease antibiotic use ( ). Patients who are seriously ill, who deteriorate clinically despite antibiotic therapy (...) was 18 for 1 patient to be cured rapidly, but the number needed to harm from adverse effects from antibiotics was 8 ( ). Most patients with acute rhinosinusitis should be managed with supportive care ( ); analgesics may be offered for pain, and antipyretics may be offered for fever. Additional therapies that may provide symptomatic relief include systemic or topical decongestants, saline nasal irrigation, mucolytics, intranasal corticosteroids, and antihistamines tailored to the patient's symptoms

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2016 American College of Physicians

8. NHMRC Statement on Homeopathy and NHMRC Information Paper - Evidence on the effectiveness of homeopathy for treating health conditions

. There is no reliable evidence that homeopathy is as effective as the other therapies for the treatment of these health conditions: • acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion (inflammation of the middle ear) in children (compared with antibiotics, mucolytic medicines, secretolytic medicines, antipyretic medicines, nasal sprays, or monitoring the condition but not providing treatment [‘watchful waiting’]) • allergic rhinitis (compared with antihistamines, cortisone or intranasal cromolyn sodium) • anxiety

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

10. Therapeutic Equivalence of Two Formulations of Fluticasone Propionate and Salmeterol Inhalation Powder in Subjects With Asthma

episode(s) requiring intubation, and/or associated with hypercapnoea; respiratory arrest or hypoxic seizures, asthma related syncopal episode(s), or asthma-related hospitalizations within one year before Screening or during the run-in period. Allergy or significant history of hypersensitivity, idiosyncratic reactions, or intolerance to any sympathomimetic drug (e.g., salmeterol or albuterol), or any inhaled, intranasal, or systemic corticosteroid therapy, or milk proteins. History of cystic fibrosis (...) Screening. Use of oral or parenteral corticosteroids within one month before Screening. Use of muscarinic beta2-agonists (MABAs), ipratropium bromide, or ipratropium bromide with albuterol within 24 hours before Screening. Use of cromolyn sodium within 24 hours before Screening. Use of antihistamines (other than cetirizine, desloratadine, or diphenhydramine), including fexofenadine and loratadine, within 48 hours before Screening or Randomization. Use of cetirizine within 36 hours before Screening

2018 Clinical Trials

11. A Pivotal Study to Assess the Effectiveness of Nasal Dilator (Breathe Right Nasal Strips)

, Claritin, Clarinex, Zyrtec). e) Within 14 days prior to initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Intranasal cromolyn ii. Intranasal antihistamines (e.g. Astelin, Astepro) f) Within 4 weeks prior to the initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Intranasal corticosteroids g) Within 8 weeks prior to the initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Inhaled oral, intramuscular, intravenous, ocular and/or dermatological corticosteroid (with the exception of 1% or less topical (...) disordered breathing including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), mandibular advancement devices, tongue displacement devices iv. Use of any intranasally administered medications (e.g. Miacalcin) b) Within 3 days prior to the initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Oral decongestants ii. Short-acting prescription and non-prescription antihistamines, including ocular preparations and antihistamines contained in OTC sleep medications or 'night time' pain formulations (e.g. Benadryl

2018 Clinical Trials

12. A Pivotal Subjective Sleep Study of a Nasal Dilator (Breathe Right Tan)

(nasal sprays, drops, etc). ii. OTC products such as chin straps, pillows, internal/external nasal dilators. d) Within 10 days prior to initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Long-acting antihistamines (e.g. Allegra, Claritin, Clarinex, Zyrtec). e) Within 14 days prior to initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Intranasal cromolyn ii. Intranasal antihistamines (e.g. Astelin, Astepro) f) Within 4 weeks prior to the initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i. Intranasal (...) , tryptophan, valerian root, kava kava, melatonin, St John's Wort and Alluna. Use of OTC alertness aids including caffeine and guarana. ii. Lubricating sprays/rinses/throat strips iii. Devices prescribed or used for sleep disordered breathing including Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), mandibular advancement devices, tongue displacement devices iv. Use of any intranasally administered medications (e.g. Miacalcin) b) Within 3 days prior to the initiation of the baseline qualification phase: i

2018 Clinical Trials

13. OPN-375 Efficacy and Safety in Adolescents With Bilateral Nasal Polyps

decongestants, intranasal antihistamines, intranasal steroids, intranasal sodium cromolyn, nasal atropine, nasal ipratropium bromide, as well as inhaled corticosteroids (except permitted doses listed above for asthma) at Visit 1 (Screening). (Note: intranasal antibiotics and saline are permissible) If taking oral antihistamines, must be on a stable regimen for at least 2 weeks prior to the Visit 1 (Screening), and agree to not change the dose of these medications until after Visit 3 (Week 4) of the study (...) assigned to receive 1 of 2 study treatments using a 2:1 ratio (OPN-375 186 μg: Placebo). For the PK sub-study, up to 14 subjects will be enrolled to obtain 10 completers. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Bilateral Nasal Polyposis Drug: OPN-375 Phase 3 Detailed Description: The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of intranasal administration of OPN-375 186 μg Twice a Day (BID) versus placebo in adolescents with bilateral nasal polyposis and nasal congestion

2018 Clinical Trials

14. Treatments for seasonal allergic rhinitis

allergic rhinitis. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 120. 2013 Authors' objectives This review compared the effectiveness and common adverse events of medication classes used to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) in adolescents and adults, in pregnant women, and in children. We sought to compare the following classes of drugs: oral and nasal antihistamines and decongestants; intranasal corticosteroids, mast cell stabilizers (cromolyn

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

15. Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, and Preliminary Efficacy of B244 in Healthy Volunteers and Subjects With Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

in the previous three months or during the protocol.* Intranasal corticosteroid use in the previous month or during the protocol.* Intranasal antihistamine or cromolyn use in the previous week or during the study.* Allergen immunotherapy during previous 12 months or during the protocol.* Omalizumab use in previous 12 months or during the protocol.* Systemic antihistamine or leukotriene modifying medication use in the previous week or during the protocol.* Use of antibiotics, NSAIDS, antihypertensives, beta (...) , and preliminary efficacy of B244 delivered as an intranasal spray in healthy volunteers and subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Allergic Rhinitis Allergic Rhinitis Due to Grass Pollen Healthy Volunteers Biological: B244 suspension Biological: Vehicle Phase 1 Phase 2 Detailed Description: This is a Prospective, Controlled, Double Blinded, Single Center, Randomized, 3 Arm, Parallel Assignment, Phase 1b/2a Study to assess the safety, tolerability

2017 Clinical Trials

16. Allergic Rhinitis

with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), in uncontrolled hypertension, and in severe coronary artery disease and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). • Leukotriene inhibitors (prescription-only) are less effective than intranasal corticosteroids [II A*]. Consider using for patients who cannot tolerate first line agents or have co-morbid asthma. • Intranasal cromolyn (OTC) is less effective than intranasal corticosteroids [II A*]. Cromolyn is a good alternative for patients who are not candidates (...) /day Rx $95 $145 $132 olopatadine hydrochloride spray Patanase 6 to 11 yrs: 1 spray EN 2x/day = 12 yrs: 2 sprays EN 2x/day Rx n/a $167 Intranasal Mast Cell Stabilizers cromolyn sodium spray Nasalcrom = 2 yrs: 1 spray EN 3-6 x/day OTC $15 $30 Intranasal Anticholinergic ipratropium bromide spray Atrovent 0.03% Atrovent 0.06% = 6 yrs: 0.03% solution, 2 sprays EN 2-3x/day 5-11 yrs: 0.06% solution, 2 sprays EN 3x/day for up to 4 days = 12 yrs: 0.06% solution, 2 sprays EN 3-4x/day for up to 4 days Rx $6

2013 University of Michigan Health System

17. Treatments for Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

Treatments for Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis Structured Abstract Objectives. This review compared the effectiveness and common adverse events of medication classes used to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) in adolescents and adults, in pregnant women, and in children. We sought to compare the following classes of drugs: oral and nasal antihistamines and decongestants; intranasal corticosteroids, mast cell stabilizers (cromolyn), and anticholinergics (ipratropium); oral leukotriene receptor antagonists (...) Intranasal Corticosteroid 47 Oral Selective Antihistamine Versus Oral Decongestant 60 Oral Selective Antihistamine Versus Oral Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist (Montelukast) 65 Intranasal Corticosteroid Versus Nasal Antihistamine 76 Intranasal Corticosteroid Versus Nasal Cromolyn 90 Intranasal Corticosteroid Versus Oral Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist (Montelukast) 95 Combination Oral Selective Antihistamine Plus Intranasal Corticosteroid Versus Oral Selective Antihistamine 106 Combination Oral Selective

2013 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

18. Efficacy of Co-administration of Bilastine and Montelukast in Patients With SARC and Asthma

and/or chronic sinusitis within 30 days of Visit 2; History of eye surgery within 3 months of Visit 2; History of intranasal surgery within 3 months of Visit 2; Immunotherapy within 6 months prior to Visit 1; Upper respiratory infections including cold and systemic infections within 3 weeks of Visit 2; Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment and taking P-gp inhibitors (e.g. ketoconazole, erythromycin, cyclosporine, ritonavir, diltiazem) within 7 days prior to the first dose of study medication (...) ; Patients requiring daily "controller" medications with cromolyn-type drugs or leukotriene antagonists; Patient required daily "controller" medication with Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or LABA at medium /high dosage defined by GINA criteria; Patients with clinically important (based on principal investigator's judgment) hepatic impairment; Patients with severe concomitant disease (based on principal investigator's judgment) that could interfere with treatment response; Patients with QT syndrome

2016 Clinical Trials

19. Clinical Response to Rhinovirus Challenge

-16) 300 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50 mg/ml intranasal one time only Active Comparator: Allergic rhinitis Allergic rhinitis subjects will be infected with Rhinovirus (GMP RV16 HRV-16) Biological: Rhinovirus (GMP RV16 HRV-16) 300 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50 mg/ml intranasal one time only Active Comparator: Healthy control Healthy controls will be infected with Rhinovirus (GMP RV16 HRV-16) Biological: Rhinovirus (GMP RV16 HRV-16) 300 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50 mg (...) /ml intranasal one time only Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Change in symptom scores induced by the rhinovirus using Jackson criteria including nasal congestion, drainage, cough, wheezing [ Time Frame: Change in symptom score from day 0 to day 4 after inoculation with the rhinovirus ] Eligibility Criteria Go to Information from the National Library of Medicine Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members

2016 Clinical Trials

20. Cockroach Nasal Allergen Challenge Pilot

by (Responsible Party): National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This research is being done to look at the body's response to cockroach extract, an allergen, when sprayed into the nose. The spraying of the cockroach extract into the participant's nose is called Nasal Allergen Challenge (NAC). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a intranasal cockroach extract given to participants with asthma (...) : Glycerinated German Cockroach Allergenic Extract. Cockroach sensitive subjects are exposed to cockroach nasal allergen (NAC) intranasally at at increasing doses per protocol. The NAC aim is pursuit of optimal dose range as determined by tolerability and eliciting a threshold of nasal symptoms. Biological: Glycerinated German Cockroach Allergenic Extract Participants will receive escalating doses intranasally. Briefly: per protocol- Phase 1a NAC: N=10 cockroach sensitive adults with asthma will undergo

2016 Clinical Trials

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