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Infant Feeding

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61. Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

, 0.07 to 0.43) at 12 months in BLISS infants. Estimated differences in energy intake were 55 kJ (95% CI, -284 to 395 kJ) at 12 months and 143 kJ (95% CI, -241 to 526 kJ) at 24 months.A baby-led approach to complementary feeding did not result in more appropriate BMI than traditional spoon-feeding, although children were reported to have less food fussiness. Further research should determine whether these findings apply to individuals using unmodified baby-led weaning.http://anzctr.org.au Identifier (...) Effect of a Baby-Led Approach to Complementary Feeding on Infant Growth and Overweight: A Randomized Clinical Trial Baby-led approaches to complementary feeding, which promote self-feeding of all nonliquid foods are proposed to improve energy self-regulation and lower obesity risk. However, to date, no randomized clinical trials have studied this proposition.To determine whether a baby-led approach to complementary feeding results in a lower body mass index (BMI) than traditional spoon

2017 EvidenceUpdates

62. Guidelines for caring for an infant, child, or young person who requires enteral feeding

to ensure a consistent approach for staff and families. ? Provide a standardised approach to training for all staff and parents whose infants/children/young people require enteral feeding. ? Improve communication and documentation processes between hospital and community for infant/children/young people that require enteral feeding. Note: This guideline excludes neonates/ pre-term babies because their physiology is different to that of an older baby. As a result, staff caring for such babies within (...) Guidelines for caring for an infant, child, or young person who requires enteral feeding 1 Guidelines for caring for an infant, child, or young person who requires enteral feeding FEBRUARY 2015 2 Contents Preface 3 Aims of Guidelines 4 Enteral Feeding 5 Enteral Feeding Devices 6 Enteral Device Essentials 8 Discharging a child from hospital to home following insertion of an enteral feeding device 9 Competency Based Training 9 Infection Prevention and Control in Enteral Feeding 10 Post-Insertion

2015 Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority

63. Nasogastric Feeding Tube Sizes for Enteral Feeds: Guidelines

nasogastric feeding tubes sizes for enteral feeds? Key Message Two evidence based guidelines were identified regarding nasogastric feeding tubes for enteral feeds in adults and pediatrics. Tags enteral nutrition, medical devices, nasoenteric, nasogastric, Measurement, ng tube, french tube, dimensions Files Rapid Response Reference List Published : May 12, 2017 Follow us: © 2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our newsletter: (...) Nasogastric Feeding Tube Sizes for Enteral Feeds: Guidelines Nasogastric Feeding Tube Sizes for Enteral Feeds: Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Nasogastric Feeding Tube Sizes for Enteral Feeds: Guidelines Nasogastric Feeding Tube Sizes for Enteral Feeds: Guidelines Published on: May 12, 2017 Project Number: RA0905-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

64. Effects of two different feeding positions on physiological characteristics and feeding performance of preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effects of two different feeding positions on physiological characteristics and feeding performance of preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to determine the effect of semielevated side-lying (ESL) and semielevated supine (ESU) positions, which are used to bottle-feed preterm infants, on their physiological characteristics and feeding performance.The sample consisted of preterm infants who were born in the 31st gestational week and below (...) , and met the inclusion criteria. A randomization was provided in the sample group with a total of 80 infants including 38 infants in the ESL (experimental) group and 42 infants in the ESU (control) group. Both groups were compared in terms of their SpO2 values, heart rates, and feeding performances before, during, and after the feeding. The data were obtained by using a form for infant descriptive characteristics, feeding follow-up form, a Masimo Radical-7 pulse oximeter device, and a video camera.It

2018 Journal for specialists in pediatric nursing : JSPN Controlled trial quality: uncertain

65. Effect of a Delayed Start to Oral Feeding on Feeding Performance and Physiological Responses in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

Effect of a Delayed Start to Oral Feeding on Feeding Performance and Physiological Responses in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial. The efficient and safe oral feeding of preterm infants, an essential criterion for hospital discharge, is affected by neurodevelopmental maturation. However, the timing of initiating oral feeding and its relation to maturation, feeding performance, and physiological responses are unclear.The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a 1-week delay (...) in the initiation of oral feeding on feeding performance, transition time, weight gain, and cardiorespiratory responses in preterm infants.In this randomized controlled trial, 40 infants with a gestational age at birth of less than 32 weeks were recruited. The control group (n = 18) began oral feeding when the infants were physiologically stable, whereas the experimental group (n = 22) began oral feeding 1 week later. Infant feeding performance, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were measured before, during

2018 The journal of nursing research : JNR Controlled trial quality: uncertain

66. Optimal Feeding Tube Dwell Time in VLBW Infants to Reduce Feeding Tube Contamination

Optimal Feeding Tube Dwell Time in VLBW Infants to Reduce Feeding Tube Contamination Optimal Feeding Tube Dwell Time in VLBW Infants to Reduce Feeding Tube Contamination - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before (...) adding more. Optimal Feeding Tube Dwell Time in VLBW Infants to Reduce Feeding Tube Contamination The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03728608 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : November 2, 2018

2018 Clinical Trials

67. A reverse metabolic approach to weaning: in silico identification of immune-beneficial infant gut bacteria, mining their metabolism for prebiotic feeds and sourcing these feeds in the natural product space Full Text available with Trip Pro

A reverse metabolic approach to weaning: in silico identification of immune-beneficial infant gut bacteria, mining their metabolism for prebiotic feeds and sourcing these feeds in the natural product space Weaning is a period of marked physiological change. The introduction of solid foods and the changes in milk consumption are accompanied by significant gastrointestinal, immune, developmental, and microbial adaptations. Defining a reduced number of infections as the desired health benefit (...) for infants around weaning, we identified in silico (i.e., by advanced public domain mining) infant gut microbes as potential deliverers of this benefit. We then investigated the requirements of these bacteria for exogenous metabolites as potential prebiotic feeds that were subsequently searched for in the natural product space.Using public domain literature mining and an in silico reverse metabolic approach, we constructed probiotic-prebiotic-food associations, which can guide targeted feeding of immune

2018 Microbiome

68. Infant feeding practices and determinant variables for early complementary feeding in the first 8 months of life: results from the Brazilian MAL-ED cohort site Full Text available with Trip Pro

, complementary feeding introduction and description of the WHO core indicators on infant and young child feeding. Infant feeding practices were related to socio-economic status (SES), assessed by Water/sanitation, wealth measured by a set of eight Assets, Maternal education and monthly household Income (WAMI index). Two logistic regression models were constructed to evaluate risk factors associated with early complementary feeding.Based on twice weekly follow-up, 65 % of the children received exclusive (...) breast-feeding in the first month of life and 5 % in the sixth month. Complementary feeding was offered in the first month: 29 % of the children received water, 15 % infant formulas, 13 % other milks and 9·4 % grain-derived foods. At 6 months, dietary diversity and minimum acceptable diet were both 47 % and these increased to 69 % at 8 months. No breast-feeding within the first hour of birth was a risk factor for the early introduction of water (adjusted OR=4·68; 95 % CI 1·33, 16·47) and low WAMI

2018 Public health nutrition

69. Nutritional status of in-school children and its associated factors in Denkyembour District, eastern region, Ghana: comparing schools with feeding and non-school feeding policies Full Text available with Trip Pro

Nutritional status of in-school children and its associated factors in Denkyembour District, eastern region, Ghana: comparing schools with feeding and non-school feeding policies Childhood malnutrition still remains a major public health problem impacting negatively on the academic aptitude of school-aged children (SAC) particularly in limited resource countries. The Government of Ghana in collaboration with the Dutch Government introduced the school feeding programme (SFP) to boost (...) higher among children in schools on SFP than in children in schools without SFP. An evaluation of the implementation of the school feeding programme is recommended for future studies.

2018 Nutrition journal

70. Maternal Feeding Practices among Children with Feeding Difficulties—Cross-sectional Study in a Brazilian Reference Center Full Text available with Trip Pro

Maternal Feeding Practices among Children with Feeding Difficulties—Cross-sectional Study in a Brazilian Reference Center Given the positive influence of responsive caregiving on dietary habits in childhood, to raise awareness of caregivers regarding their behavior is crucial in multidisciplinary care on infant feeding.To identify the most common responsive and non-responsive feeding practices in mothers of children with feeding complaints, as well as to seek associations between practices (...) and caregivers' profile.Cross-sectional study with 77 children under 18 years old, with complaints of feeding difficulties. Data were collected during interviews with mothers: child age, gender, duration of exclusive breastfeeding, presence of organic disease, dynamics of bottle use, self-feeding practices and posture at meals, use of appropriate feeding equipment; basic information about the mothers (parity and level of education), caregiver feeding style, presence of coercive feeding, frequency

2018 Frontiers in pediatrics

71. Protocol for a feasibility trial for improving breast feeding initiation and continuation: assets-based infant feeding help before and after birth (ABA). Full Text available with Trip Pro

and After birth (ABA) infant feeding service versus usual care.A two-arm, non-blinded randomised feasibility study will be conducted in two UK localities. Women expecting their first baby will be eligible, regardless of feeding intention. The ABA infant feeding intervention will apply a proactive, assets-based, woman-centred, non-judgemental approach, delivered antenatally and postnatally tailored through face-to-face contacts, telephone and SMS texts. Outcomes will test the feasibility of delivering (...) Protocol for a feasibility trial for improving breast feeding initiation and continuation: assets-based infant feeding help before and after birth (ABA). Breast feeding improves the health of mothers and infants; the UK has low rates, with marked socioeconomic inequalities. While trials of peer support services have been effective in some settings, UK trials have not improved breast feeding rates. Qualitative research suggests that many women are alienated by the focus on breast feeding. We

2018 BMJ open Controlled trial quality: uncertain

72. Facilitate the Transition From Passive Feeding to Active Feeding in Preterm Infants Through Early Play

Population Premate newborn with an age inferior to 32 weeks of amenorrhea at birth Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Age of child at birth: <32 WA justified by the greater prevalence of oral disorders in these children. Age of the child at the start of the study: 35 WA, ie at the beginning of the establishment of active feeding within the unit. Exclusion Criteria: Children with oral malformations Contra-indication to the realization to the ALIJEU (infection in progress, hemodynamic instability, etc.) Medical (...) Facilitate the Transition From Passive Feeding to Active Feeding in Preterm Infants Through Early Play Facilitate the Transition From Passive Feeding to Active Feeding in Preterm Infants Through Early Play - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2018 Clinical Trials

73. Continuous versus bolus intragastric tube feeding for preterm and low birth weight infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. (Abstract)

Continuous versus bolus intragastric tube feeding for preterm and low birth weight infants with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a particularly common condition in preterm and low birth weight infants. These infants are also more likely to have excessive regurgitation, as they do not have a fully developed antireflux mechanism. Preterm and low birth weight infants who are unable to suck oral feeds are required to be fed via an intragastric tube for varying (...) and European Society for Paediatric Research) from 1990 to 2012.Published and unpublished RCTs and quasi-RCTs were eligible for inclusion in this review, as were cluster-randomised and cross-over randomised trials that compared the effects of continuous versus intermittent bolus intragastric tube feeding on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in preterm and low birth weight infants.Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility and quality.We found no trials that met the inclusion criteria

2014 Cochrane

74. Cohort study: Being overweight in infancy predicts overweight in childhood regardless of infant feeding method

accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Being overweight in infancy predicts overweight in childhood regardless of infant feeding method Article Text Child health Cohort study Being overweight in infancy predicts overweight (...) Cohort study: Being overweight in infancy predicts overweight in childhood regardless of infant feeding method Being overweight in infancy predicts overweight in childhood regardless of infant feeding method | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

75. A mHealth voice messaging intervention to improve infant and young child feeding practices in Senegal. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A mHealth voice messaging intervention to improve infant and young child feeding practices in Senegal. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have the potential to improve infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices; however, gaps in the literature remain regarding their design, implementation and effectiveness. The aims of this study were to: design a mHealth voice messaging intervention delivered to mothers and fathers targeting IYCF practices and examine its implementation and impact (...) in households with children 6-23 months in three rural villages in Senegal. We conducted focus groups (n=6) to inform the intervention development. We then conducted a pilot study (n=47 households) to examine the impact of the intervention on IYCF practices of children 6-23 months. Voice messages were sent to the children's mothers and fathers over a period of four weeks (2 messages/week; 8 messages in total), and 24-hour dietary recalls and food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were conducted before

2019 Maternal & child nutrition

76. Perceptions of commercial snack food and beverages for infant and young child feeding: A mixed-methods study among caregivers in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Perceptions of commercial snack food and beverages for infant and young child feeding: A mixed-methods study among caregivers in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Ensuring nutritious complementary feeding is vital for child nutrition. Prior research in Kathmandu Valley found high consumption rates of commercially produced snack foods among young children, which are often energy-dense/nutrient poor. This mixed-methods study was conducted to elicit Nepali caregivers' perceptions of commercial snack foods (...) and beverages and factors influencing their use for young child feeding. Seven facilitated focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with Kathmandu Valley caregivers of children 12-23 months, and a survey of 745 primary caregivers of children 12-23 months of age was then conducted. During the FGD, caregivers reported commonly providing commercial food and beverage products to their children as snacks, and 98.6% of caregivers participating in the survey reported feeding their child such a food

2019 Maternal & child nutrition

77. Information Diffusion and Social Norms Are Associated with Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices in Bangladesh. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Information Diffusion and Social Norms Are Associated with Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices in Bangladesh. Interaction within mothers' social networks can theoretically diffuse messages from interventions and campaigns into norms and practices for infant and young child feeding (IYCF).We hypothesized that mothers' social networks, diffusion of information, and social norms differed in intensive [intensive interpersonal counseling (IPC), community mobilization (CM), and mass media (MM

2019 Journal of Nutrition

78. Examining the effects of an eHealth intervention from infant age 6 to 12 months on child eating behaviors and maternal feeding practices one year after cessation: The Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Examining the effects of an eHealth intervention from infant age 6 to 12 months on child eating behaviors and maternal feeding practices one year after cessation: The Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health. The Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health provided parental anticipatory guidance on early protective feeding practices from child age 6 to 12 months through an eHealth intervention. Previously published outcomes at child age 12 months (...) indicated that the eHealth intervention increased daily vegetable/fruit intake and promoted more beneficial mealtime routines. The objective of the current paper is to evaluate the effects of the intervention at child age 24 months, one year after cessation.Parents of infants aged 3-5 months were recruited via social media and child health clinics during spring 2016. At child age 5.5 months, 715 mothers were randomized to either control (n = 358) or intervention (n = 360) arm. Primary study-outcomes

2019 PloS one Controlled trial quality: uncertain

79. Strengthening advocacy and policy change for infant and young child feeding. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Strengthening advocacy and policy change for infant and young child feeding. The creation of environments that are more supportive of optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF) requires countries to enact policies, such as those related to the Maternity Protection Convention, the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (the Code), and the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. However, challenges are experienced in the translation of international policy standards (...) into national legal measures, and there is an important gap in understanding how countries achieve progress. Policy advocacy is a nearly universal feature, but there are methodological challenges and few studies evaluating strategies and effects. The purpose of this supplement to Maternal & Child Nutrition is to address those gaps. This supplement contains three papers that present findings from a real-time evaluation of the advocacy efforts of Alive & Thrive (A&T), United Nations International Children's

2019 Maternal & child nutrition

80. Contribution of the Alive & Thrive-UNICEF advocacy efforts to improve infant and young child feeding policies in Southeast Asia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Contribution of the Alive & Thrive-UNICEF advocacy efforts to improve infant and young child feeding policies in Southeast Asia. Evaluating the impact of advocacy for policy change presents many challenges. Recent advances in the field of evaluation, such as contribution analysis (CA), offer guidance on how to make credible claims regarding such impact. The purposes of this article are (a) to detail the application of CA to assess the contribution of an advocacy initiative to improve infant (...) and young child feeding policies and (b) to present the emergent theory of change and contribution story of how progress was achieved. An evaluation applying developmental evaluation and CA was conducted on the Alive & Thrive (A&T)-UNICEF initiative in seven Southeast Asian countries to document the extent to which policy objectives were achieved and identify key drivers of policy change. A contribution story was developed based on these experiences. The advocacy approach, which involved a four-part

2019 Maternal & child nutrition

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