How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

12,750 results for

Infant Feeding

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

181. Use of Starch and Modified Starches in Infant Feeding: A Historical Perspective. (PubMed)

Use of Starch and Modified Starches in Infant Feeding: A Historical Perspective. There is a long history of the use of starch in infant feeding. Proprietary infant foods (1867-1920) contained added starch from either cereal grains or malted carbohydrates. When evaporated milk became available in the 1920s, the use of proprietary foods fell out of favor. Evaporated milk formulas were a mixture of milk, water, and modified starch or milk sugar (lactose). By the late 1920s, however, corn syrup (...) became the most common modified starch added to evaporated milk formulas as it was widely available, inexpensive, and readily accepted. The ongoing development of the modern calorie-based infant formula, made from non-fat cow's milk, lactose, oleo and vegetable oils, largely replaced the evaporated milk formulas in the 1960s. On the other hand, after 1940, added starch and modified starch became increasingly important in the production of pureed fruits and vegetables. Not surprisingly, this included

2018 Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

182. Post-Discharge Feeding of Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants: Adherence to Nutrition Guidelines. (PubMed)

Post-Discharge Feeding of Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants: Adherence to Nutrition Guidelines. Infant feeding guidelines are important public health strategies to promote optimal growth, development, and chronic disease prevention, but their effectiveness is contingent upon families' ability to adhere to them. Little is known of adherence to guidelines among nutritionally vulnerable infants, specifically those born very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) (<1500 g). This study investigated whether (...) postdischarge feeding practices for VLBW infants align with current recommendations and explored parental and infant baseline sociodemographics related to these practices.Prospectively collected data from families of 300 VLBW infants participating in a randomized clinical trial (ISRCTN35317141) were used. Baseline demographics were obtained at enrollment and postdischarge feeding practices via monthly telephone questionnaires to 6 months corrected age (CA).At discharge, 4 and 6 months CA, 72%, 39%, and 29

2018 Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

183. The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016: Study Design and Methods. (PubMed)

The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016: Study Design and Methods. Diet and feeding patterns during the infant, toddler, and preschool years affect nutrient adequacy or excess during critical developmental periods. Understanding food consumption, feeding practices, and nutrient adequacy or excess during these periods is essential to establishing appropriate recommendations aimed at instilling healthy eating behaviors in children.The objective of the 2016 Feeding Infants and Toddlers (...) Study (FITS 2016) was to update our knowledge on the diets and feeding patterns of young children and to provide new data in related areas such as feeding behaviors, sleep, physical activity, and screen use. This article describes the study design, data collection methods, 24-h dietary recall (24-h recall) protocol, and sample characteristics of FITS 2016.FITS 2016 is a cross-sectional study of caregivers of children aged <4 y living in the 50 states and Washington, DC. Data collection occurred

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of Nutrition

184. Usual Nutrient Intakes from the Diets of US Children by WIC Participation and Income: Findings from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. (PubMed)

Usual Nutrient Intakes from the Diets of US Children by WIC Participation and Income: Findings from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. A recent report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) outlined priority nutrients for infants and children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).The objective of this study was to assess usual nutrient intakes from foods and beverages (not supplements (...) ) among US children aged <4 y by WIC participation status.A national random sample of children aged <4 y (n = 3,235) from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016 was categorized by WIC participation status (participants, lower-income nonparticipants, or higher-income nonparticipants) and age (younger infants aged 0-5.9 mo, older infants aged 6-11.9 mo, toddlers aged 12-23.9 mo, or preschoolers aged 24-47.9 mo). All participants contributed one 24-h dietary recall, with a second recall from

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of Nutrition

185. Total Usual Nutrient Intakes of US Children (Under 48 Months): Findings from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. (PubMed)

Total Usual Nutrient Intakes of US Children (Under 48 Months): Findings from the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2016. The US Dietary Guidelines will expand in 2020 to include infants and toddlers. Understanding current dietary intakes is critical to inform policy.The purpose of this analysis was to examine the usual total nutrient intakes from diet and supplements among US children.The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study 2016 is a national cross-sectional study of children aged <48 mo (...) (n = 3235): younger infants (birth to 5.9 mo), older infants (6-11.9 mo), toddlers (12-23.9 mo), younger preschoolers (24-36.9 mo), and older preschoolers (36-47.9 mo) based on the use of a 24-h dietary recall. A second 24-h recall was collected from a representative subsample (n = 799). Energy, total nutrient intake distributions, and compliance with Dietary Reference Intakes were estimated with the use of the National Cancer Institute method.Dietary supplement use was 15-23% among infants

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of Nutrition

186. Early progressive feeding in extremely preterm infants: a randomized trial. (PubMed)

Early progressive feeding in extremely preterm infants: a randomized trial. Due to insufficient evidence, extremely preterm infants (≤28 wk of gestation) rarely receive early progressive feeding (small increments of feeding volumes between 1 and 4 d after birth). We hypothesized that early progressive feeding increases the number of full enteral feeding days in the first month after birth.The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of early progressive feeding (...) in extremely preterm infants.In this single-center randomized trial, extremely preterm infants born between September 2016 and June 2017 were randomly assigned to receive either early progressive feeding without trophic feeding (early feeding group) or delayed progressive feeding after a 4-d course of trophic feeding (delayed feeding group). Treatment allocation occurred before or on feeding day 1. The primary outcome was the number of full enteral feeding days in the first month after birth. Secondary

2018 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

187. Oral feeding outcomes in infants with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. (PubMed)

Oral feeding outcomes in infants with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. The purpose of this study was to explore oral feeding outcomes in infants born with type-C esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF).A retrospective cohort study of all infants born between January 2005 and December 2015 undergoing surgery for type-C EA/TEF at the University of Alberta Hospital was performed.Fifty-seven infants were identified, of which 61.4% were exclusively orally feeding (...) positive predictor for the discontinuation of PN.We report the rate of oral feeding at discharge for infants born with type-C EA/TEF and identify predictor variables. This information is important for health care professionals and the families of children born with EA/TEF, because a significant number will go home with supplemental nutrition by gavage tube or other routes.Level 2.Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2018 Journal of Pediatric Surgery

188. The Pathways from a Behavior Change Communication Intervention to Infant and Young Child Feeding in Bangladesh Are Mediated and Potentiated by Maternal Self-Efficacy. (PubMed)

The Pathways from a Behavior Change Communication Intervention to Infant and Young Child Feeding in Bangladesh Are Mediated and Potentiated by Maternal Self-Efficacy. Although self-efficacy is a potential determinant of feeding and care behaviors, there is limited empirical analysis of the role of maternal self-efficacy in low- and middle-income countries. In the context of behavior change interventions (BCIs) addressing complementary feeding (CF), it is possible that maternal self-efficacy can (...) for EGG; P = 0.037). For GLV, MSE-CF mediated (β = 0.345, P = 0.010) and potentiated (β = 0.390, P = 0.038) the effect of the intensive group. In contrast, MSE-CF did not mediate or potentiate the effect of the intervention on EGG.MSE-CF was a significant mediator and potentiator for GLV but not for EGG. The divergent findings highlight the complex determinants of individual specific infant and young child feeding behaviors. The study shows the value of measuring behavioral determinants, such as MSE

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of Nutrition

189. Infant Feeding in Relation to the Risk of Advanced Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes in Children With Increased Genetic Susceptibility: A Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Infant Feeding in Relation to the Risk of Advanced Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes in Children With Increased Genetic Susceptibility: A Cohort Study. Breastfeeding, age at introduction of foods, and food diversity in infancy were studied for associations with advanced islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. During 1996--2004, a total of 5,915 newborns with human leukocyte antigen-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes were enrolled in the prospective Finnish Type 1 Diabetes (...) = 2.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.39, 3.91; for 3-4 months vs. >4 months, hazard ratio = 2.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.38, 3.47) but not in longer follow-up (P for interaction = 0.046). Similar results were observed for age at introduction of roots, cereals, egg, and meat relative to risk of advanced islet autoimmunity. No consistent, long-term associations between infant feeding and advanced islet autoimmunity or type 1 diabetes were observed.© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University

2018 American Journal of Epidemiology

190. Infant and young child feeding in emergencies: Organisational policies and activities during the refugee crisis in Lebanon. (PubMed)

Infant and young child feeding in emergencies: Organisational policies and activities during the refugee crisis in Lebanon. Appropriate infant and young child feeding (IYCF) is key to reducing mortality amongst children aged under 2. Facilitating adherence to recommended IYCF practices during emergencies includes having relevant policies to support breastfeeding and complementary feeding as well as regulating the distribution of breast milk substitutes. In the current crisis, more than 1.2 (...) having a written policy on IYCF, but only 1 policy (in draft format) was available for inspection. Twelve (8 INGOs and 4 LNGOs) indicated endorsing an external IYCF policy, but only 6 listed a valid policy. Four organisations (3 INGOs and 1 LNGO) had programme objectives that indicate protection, promotion, and support of IYCF. Three LNGOs reported receiving infant formula donations and 5 organisations (2 INGOs and 3 LNGOs) indicated distributing infant formula; 2 (1 INGO and 1 LNGO) did so

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Maternal & child nutrition

191. Infant feeding practices within a large electronic medical record database. (PubMed)

Infant feeding practices within a large electronic medical record database. The emerging adoption of the electronic medical record (EMR) in primary care enables clinicians and researchers to efficiently examine epidemiological trends in child health, including infant feeding practices.We completed a population-based retrospective cohort study of 8815 singleton infants born at term in Ontario, Canada, April 2002 to March 2013. Newborn records were linked to the Electronic Medical Record

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

192. Autonomy and infant feeding decision-making among teenage mothers in a rural and urban setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. (PubMed)

Autonomy and infant feeding decision-making among teenage mothers in a rural and urban setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The nutritional status of infants born to teenage mothers can be sub-optimal compared to those born to older mothers. One contributing factor is inappropriate feeding practices adopted by teenage mothers. Little is known about how infant feeding decisions are made among teenage mothers, particularly in under resourced settings. In this study we prospectively explored (...) autonomy and infant feeding decision-making among teenage mothers in a rural and urban setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.This study adopted a qualitative longitudinal design. Thirty pregnant participants were recruited to the study cohort, from the catchment area of two hospitals (one urban and one rural). Participants were purposively selected to include teenagers, HIV positive, and working pregnant women. We report findings from ten teenage mothers, aged between 15 and 19 years, who participated

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

193. "I beg you…breastfeed the baby, things changed": infant feeding experiences among Ugandan mothers living with HIV in the context of evolving guidelines to prevent postnatal transmission. (PubMed)

"I beg you…breastfeed the baby, things changed": infant feeding experiences among Ugandan mothers living with HIV in the context of evolving guidelines to prevent postnatal transmission. For women living with HIV (WLWH) in low- and middle-income countries, World Health Organization (WHO) infant feeding guidelines now recommend exclusive breastfeeding until six months followed by mixed feeding until 24 months, alongside lifelong maternal antiretroviral therapy (ART). These recommendations (...) represent the sixth major revision to WHO infant feeding guidelines since 1992. We explored how WLWH in rural Uganda make infant feeding decisions in light of evolving recommendations.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 postpartum Ugandan WLWH accessing ART, who reported pregnancy < 2 years prior to recruitment. Interviews were conducted between February-August 2014 with babies born between March 2012-October 2013, over which time, the regional HIV treatment clinic recommended lifelong ART

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 BMC Public Health

194. Infant feeding-related maternity care practices and maternal report of breastfeeding outcomes. (PubMed)

Infant feeding-related maternity care practices and maternal report of breastfeeding outcomes. Evidence-based maternity practices and policies can improve breastfeeding duration and exclusivity. Maternity facilities report practices through the Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey, but individual outcomes, such as breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, are not collected.mPINC data on maternity care practices for 2009 were linked to data from the 2009 Pregnancy Risk

2018 Birth

195. Breast-Feeding Analgesia in Infants: An Update on the Current State of Evidence.

Breast-Feeding Analgesia in Infants: An Update on the Current State of Evidence. To provide an updated synthesis of the current state of the evidence for the effectiveness of breast-feeding and expressed breast milk feeding in reducing procedural pain in preterm and full-term born infants. A systematic search of key electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE) was completed. Of the 1032 abstracts screened, 21 were found eligible for inclusion. Fifteen studies reported on the use of breast (...) -feeding or expressed breast milk in full-term infants and 6 reported on preterm infants. Direct breast-feeding was more effective than maternal holding, maternal skin-to-skin contact, topical anesthetics, and music therapy, and was as or more effective than sweet tasting solutions in full-term infants. Expressed breast milk was not consistently found to reduce pain response in full-term or preterm infants. Studies generally had moderate to high risk of bias. There is sufficient evidence to recommend

2018 The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing

196. Maternal employment in low- and middle-income countries is associated with improved infant and young child feeding. (PubMed)

Maternal employment in low- and middle-income countries is associated with improved infant and young child feeding. Women's employment improves household income, and can increase resources available for food expenditure. However, employed women face time constraints that may influence caregiving and infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices. As economic and social trends shift to include more women in the labor force in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a current understanding (...) and feeding frequency in LMICs. Formally employed mothers may benefit from support for breastfeeding to enable continued breastfeeding through infancy. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03209999.

2018 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

197. Toward Understanding How Social Factors Shaped a Behavioral Intervention on Healthier Infant Formula-Feeding. (PubMed)

Toward Understanding How Social Factors Shaped a Behavioral Intervention on Healthier Infant Formula-Feeding. As part of a process evaluation, we explored in semi-structured interviews the experiences of 19 mothers who had taken part in a trial to reduce infant formula-milk intake and promote healthy weight gain, and reflections of three facilitators who delivered the intervention and control group protocols. Mothers appreciated the nonjudgmental support provided during the trial, after (...) experiencing stigma and receiving limited advice on how, how much, and how often formula-milk should be given. The information mothers had previously found, printed on formula-milk tins, or provided by family, friends, and health professionals was often perceived as contradictory; the trial guidance also conflicted with social norms relating infant health positively with weight gain. For those recruited into the trial with older infants, who had already exceeded the recommendations, reducing formula-milk

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Qualitative Health Research

198. Infant formula feeding practices associated with rapid weight gain: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Infant formula feeding practices associated with rapid weight gain: A systematic review. Excess or rapid weight gain during the first 2 years of life is associated with an increased risk of later childhood and adult overweight and obesity. When compared with breastfed infants, formula fed infants are more likely to experience excess or rapid weight gain, and this increased risk in formula fed infant populations may be due to a number of different mechanisms. These mechanisms include (...) the nutrient composition of the formula and the way formula is prepared and provided to infants. This systematic literature review examines the association between formula feeding practice and excess or rapid weight gain. This review explores these different mechanisms and provides practical recommendations for best practice formula feeding to reduce rapid weight gain. Eighteen studies are included in this review. The findings are complicated by the challenges in study design and accuracy of measurements

2018 Maternal & child nutrition

199. Infant feeding and growth: putting the horse before the cart. (PubMed)

Infant feeding and growth: putting the horse before the cart. Previous observational studies have consistently shown slower weight and length gains in infants with prolonged breastfeeding than in those who were formula-fed from birth or breastfed for a shorter duration. These studies inferred that prolonged breastfeeding causes slower growth in infancy.We compared infant growth associated with ≥12 mo of breastfeeding with a shorter duration of breastfeeding on the basis of 3 different analytic (...) and length from 6 to 12 mo. The IV analysis showed a temporal pattern that was similar to that seen in the ITT analysis, but with larger (and less precise) differences between infants breastfed for ≥12 compared with <12 mo.We observed major differences in experimental (ITT and IV) compared with observational approaches to analyzing data obtained from the same children. These approaches lead to opposite causal inferences about the relation between infant feeding and growth and underline the importance

2018 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

200. Early Serum Gut Hormone Concentrations Associated with Time to Full Enteral Feedings in Preterm Infants. (PubMed)

Early Serum Gut Hormone Concentrations Associated with Time to Full Enteral Feedings in Preterm Infants. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate early postnatal serum gut hormone concentrations in preterm infants as predictors of time to full enteral feedings. The secondary objective was to identify infant characteristics and nutritional factors that modulate serum gut hormone concentrations and time to full enteral feedings.Sixty-four preterm infants less than 30 weeks of gestation (...) to full enteral feedings after adjustment for confounders (β = -1.1, P = 0.03; and β = -0.002, P = 0.02, respectively). Nutritional intake was correlated with serum concentrations of GIP and PYY on postnatal day 7 and time to full enteral feedings. Mediation analysis revealed that the effect of serum gut hormone concentrations on time to full enteral feedings was not fully explained by nutritional intake. Intrauterine growth restriction, mechanical ventilation on postnatal day 7, and patent ductus

2018 Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>