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Infant Feeding

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1. Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (Abstract)

Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Artificial formula can be manipulated to contain higher amounts of macro-nutrients than maternal breast milk but breast milk confers important immuno-nutritional advantages for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants.To determine the effect of feeding preterm or LBW infants with formula compared with maternal breast milk on growth and developmental outcomes.We used the standard strategy of Cochrane Neonatal (...) to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2018, Issue 9), and Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid Maternity & Infant Care Database, and CINAHL to October 2018. We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula versus maternal breast milk.Two review authors planned independently to assess trial

2019 Cochrane

2. Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. (Abstract)

, and trophic substances that aid in digestion and promote gastrointestinal motility and maturation, re-feeding abnormal residuals may result in emesis, necrotising enterocolitis, or sepsis.To assess the efficacy and safety of re-feeding compared to discarding gastric residuals in preterm infants. The allocation should have been started in the first week of life and should have been continued at least until the baby reached full enteral feeds. The investigator could have chosen to discard the gastric (...) Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. Routine monitoring of gastric residuals in preterm infants on gavage feeds is a common practice in many neonatal intensive care units and is used to guide the initiation and advancement of feeds. No guidelines or consensus is available on whether to re-feed or discard the aspirated gastric residuals. Although re-feeding gastric residuals may replace partially digested milk, gastrointestinal enzymes, hormones

2019 Cochrane

3. Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. (Abstract)

Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. Preterm infants are often unable to co-ordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing for oral feeding because of their immaturity; in such cases, initial nutrition is provided by orogastric or nasogastric tube feeding. Feed intolerance is common and can delay attainment of full enteral feeds and sucking feeds, which prolongs the need for intravenous nutrition and hospital stay. Smell and taste play an important role (...) in the activation of physiological pre-absorptive processes that contribute to food digestion and absorption. However, during tube feedings, milk bypasses the nasal and oral cavities, which limits exposure to the smell and taste of milk. Provision of the smell and taste of milk with tube feedings is non-invasive and inexpensive; and if it does accelerate the transition to enteral feeds, and then to sucking feeds, it would be of considerable potential benefit to infants, their families, and the healthcare

2019 Cochrane

4. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) , 1675 infants).The GRADE certainty of evidence was moderate for rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth (downgraded for high levels of heterogeneity) and was moderate for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, moderate-certainty evidence indicates that feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results

2019 Cochrane

5. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect (...) person_outline Login keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines Preeti A Joshi, Jill Smith, Sandra Vale and Dianne E Campbell Med J Aust 2019; 210 (2): . || doi: 10.5694/mja2.12102 Published online: 14 January 2019 Topics Abstract Introduction: The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the peak professional body for clinical immunology

2019 MJA Clinical Guidelines

6. Disorders of infant feeding

. Encyclopedia on early childhood development. March 2004. http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/ (last accessed 5 July 2017). http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/sites/default/files/textes-experts/en/535/assessment-and-treatment-of-pediatric-feeding-disorders.pdf Rommel N, De Meyer AM, Feenstra L, et al. The complexity of feeding problems in 700 infants and young children presenting to a tertiary care institution. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2003;37:75-84. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12827010?tool (...) =bestpractice.com Bernard-Bonnin AC. Feeding problems of infants and toddlers. Can Fam Physician. 2006;52:1247-1251. http://www.cfp.ca/content/52/10/1247.full.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17279184?tool=bestpractice.com Field D, Garland M, Williams K. Correlates of specific childhood feeding problems. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39:299-304. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12755939?tool=bestpractice.com History and exam age <1 year time taken to feed >30 minutes stressful mealtimes abnormal

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Educational interventions for improving primary caregiver complementary feeding practices for children aged 24 months and under. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Educational interventions for improving primary caregiver complementary feeding practices for children aged 24 months and under. Although complementary feeding is a universal practice, the methods and manner in which it is practiced vary between cultures, individuals and socioeconomic classes. The period of complementary feeding is a critical time of transition in the life of an infant, and inappropriate complementary feeding practices, with their associated adverse health consequences, remain (...) a significant global public health problem. Educational interventions are widely acknowledged as effective in promoting public health strategy, and those aimed at improving complementary feeding practices provide information about proper complementary feeding practices to caregivers of infants/children. It is therefore important to summarise evidence on the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve the complementary feeding practices of caregivers of infants.To assess the effectiveness

2018 Cochrane

10. Decision-making around gastrostomy tube feeding in children with neurologic impairment: Engaging effectively with families

Decision-making around gastrostomy tube feeding in children with neurologic impairment: Engaging effectively with families Children with neurologic impairment may not be able to feed safely or sufficiently by mouth to maintain an adequate nutritional state. Gastrostomy tube (G-tube) feeding is an important, often essential, intervention in such situations. However, many parents and families struggle with the decision to proceed with G-tube feeding. This practice point reviews common reasons (...) for decisional conflict in parents and explores key aspects of life with G-tube feeding. A framework for shared decision-making and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) approach are highlighted. Practical recommendations for clinicians on engaging with families for decision-making around this life-changing intervention are provided. Keywords: G-tube; ICF; Shared decision-making

2018 Canadian Paediatric Society

11. Child health: Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis

Child health: Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can (...) infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Article Text Commentary Child health Feeding preterm infants with formula rather than donor breast milk is associated with faster rates of short-term growth, but increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis Karen Tosh Correspondence to Karen Tosh, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HJ, UK

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

12. High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. Breast milk alone, given at standard recommended volumes (150 to 180 mL/kg/d), is not adequate to meet the protein, energy, and other nutrient requirements of growing preterm or low birth weight infants. One strategy that may be used to address these potential nutrient deficits is to give infants enteral feeds in excess of 200 mL/kg/d ('high-volume' feeds). This approach may increase nutrient (...) uptake and growth rates, but concerns include that high-volume enteral feeds may cause feed intolerance, gastro-oesophageal reflux, aspiration pneumonia, necrotising enterocolitis, or complications related to fluid overload, including patent ductus arteriosus and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.To assess the effect on growth and safety of feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with high (> 200 mL/kg/d) versus standard (≤ 200 mL/kg/d) volume of enteral feeds. Infants in intervention and control groups

2017 Cochrane

13. Infant feeding: weaning

of age. Use Ready to Feed (RTF) water, order number: ABT 055. Juices should not be given ( ). Bottle-feeding is discouraged from one year of age in healthy children ( ). Please note: Sick babies and children may need to drink from a bottle well into their toddlerhood ( ). Feeding difficulties in tube fed infants Stimulate the mouth during a tube feed. Seek the advice of your ward speech and language therapist for the right technique ( ). Give the baby a dummy to suck while they are being tube fed (...) Infant feeding: weaning Infant feeding: weaning | Great Ormond Street Hospital Google Tag Manager Navigation Search Search You are here Infant feeding: weaning Infant feeding: weaning ). Some babies may benefit from solids sooner and may be ready for solids from four months (17 weeks of age). Each baby should be assessed on its needs for solids individually. Discuss this with your ward dietitian ( ). Some babies with certain clinical conditions may have solids introduced before 17 weeks

2017 Publication 1593

14. Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question

to text message parents with the goal of influencing parents’ knowledge and behaviours around the feeding practices of their children. 2 Issue & Context Every year, approximately 15,000-16,000 babies are born in Peel (1) and their parents have access to many different information sources intended to help them raise their children with health as a priority. However, the credibility of these sources can vary greatly. Often this can lead to parents feeling overwhelmed with conflicting messages (...) that infants be introduced to solid foods at around six months of age, when a baby consistently demonstrates the signs of readiness for solid foods (4). However, parents are receiving conflicting advice on infant feeding (2) and local data indicate that almost a quarter of infants in Peel are being introduced to solid food too early (at less than five months of age) or too late (after 7 months of age) (5). This is an example of a health issue in which a text messaging intervention may be able to provide

2018 Peel Health Library

15. HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance

Purpose of this document The purpose of this document is to provide operational guidance on HIV and infant feeding in emergencies. It is intended to be used to complement emergency and sectoral guidelines on health, nutrition and HIV, including specifically IYCF, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART). It aims to support pregnant and lactating women living with HIV in feeding their HIV-exposed infants (0–11 months) and young children (12 (...) children, including issues around infant and young child feeding 27 4.2 Mothers living with HIV and feeding of their infants and young children 27 4.3 Operational gaps 27 5. Roles and responsibilities 28 5.1 Government 28 5.2 United Nations agencies 28 5.3 International and local nongovernmental organizations 29 5.4 Donors 29iv HIV AND INFANT FEEDING IN EMERGENCIES: OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE Annex 1: Meeting description 30 Annex 2: Country experiences 31 Annex 3: Extracts from Infant and young child feeding

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

16. ASCIA Clinical Update Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention

ASCIA Clinical Update Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention 1 Infant Feeding and Allergy Prevention Clinical Update Background ASCIA Guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention were developed in 2016 to outline practices that may help reduce the risk of infants developing allergies, particularly early onset allergic diseases such as eczema and food allergy 1 . The reasons for the continued rise in allergic diseases such as food allergy and eczema are complex and not well understood (...) beverages are not recommended for infants as the main source of milk before 12 months of age. 2. Key recommendations for infant feeding and allergy prevention • When the infant is ready, at around 6 months, but not before 4 months, start to introduce a variety of solid foods, starting with iron rich foods, preferably whilst continuing to breastfeed. • All infants should be given the common food allergens (peanut, tree nuts, cow’s milk, egg, wheat, soy, sesame, fish and shellfish), including smooth

2018 Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

17. Feeding and Swallowing Assessment Services for Pediatric Populations in Canada: Service Provision, Practice Models, and Assessment Tools

and Swallowing Assessment Services for Pediatric Populations in Canada: Service Provision, Practice Models, and Assessment Tools March 2017 Context Pediatric feeding and swallowing assessment services are concerned with evaluating and diagnosing children who experience difficulty eating, drinking, and swallowing (also known as dysphagia). 1 Providing these services appropriately may require the skills of a number of health care practitioners, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs), physicians (...) that cautions that there is limited evidence regarding the validity and reliability of non-instrumental measurements of dysphagia in children. 11 An Environmental Scan of feeding and swallowing assessment services for pediatric populations in Canada was requested. The information may be used to inform feeding and swallowing assessment services in Canadian pediatric hospitals. Objectives The objective of this Environmental Scan is to identify and summarize information regarding the feeding and swallowing

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Environmental Scanning

18. Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs

Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library (...) Management You did not add any article to your library yet. × User Password Log in × Reset password If you need to reset your password please enter your email and click the Send button. You will receive an email to complete the process. Email Send × Library Management × March 2017. Volume 13. Number 1 Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs Rating: 0 (0 Votes) Reviewers: , . | Newsletter Free Subscription

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

19. Instruments for assessing readiness to commence suck feeds in preterm infants: effects on time to establish full oral feeding and duration of hospitalisation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Instruments for assessing readiness to commence suck feeds in preterm infants: effects on time to establish full oral feeding and duration of hospitalisation. One of the most challenging milestones for preterm infants is the acquisition of safe and efficient feeding skills. The majority of healthy full term infants are born with skills to coordinate their suck, swallow and respiration. However, this is not the case for preterm infants who develop these skills gradually as they transition from (...) tube feeding to suck feeds. For preterm infants the ability to engage in oral feeding behaviour is dependent on many factors. The complexity of factors influencing feeding readiness has led some researchers to investigate the use of an individualised assessment of an infant's abilities. A limited number of instruments that aim to indicate an individual infant's readiness to commence either breast or bottle feeding have been developed.To determine the effects of using a feeding readiness instrument

2016 Cochrane

20. Early discharge with home support of gavage feeding for stable preterm infants who have not established full oral feeds. (Abstract)

Early discharge with home support of gavage feeding for stable preterm infants who have not established full oral feeds. Early discharge of stable preterm infants still requiring gavage feeds offers the benefits of uniting families sooner and reducing healthcare and family costs compared with discharge home when on full sucking feeds. Potential disadvantages of early discharge include increased care burden for the family and risk of complications related to gavage feeding.To determine (...) the effects of a policy of early discharge of stable preterm infants with home support of gavage feeding compared with a policy of discharge of such infants when they have reached full sucking feeds.We planned subgroup analyses to determine whether safety and efficacy outcomes are altered by the type of support received (outpatient visits vs home support) or by the maturity of the infants discharged (gestational age ≤ 28 weeks at birth or birth weight ≤ 1000 grams).We used the standard search strategy

2015 Cochrane

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