How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

12,750 results for

Infant Feeding

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. (PubMed)

Re-feeding versus discarding gastric residuals to improve growth in preterm infants. Routine monitoring of gastric residuals in preterm infants on gavage feeds is a common practice in many neonatal intensive care units and is used to guide the initiation and advancement of feeds. No guidelines or consensus is available on whether to re-feed or discard the aspirated gastric residuals. Although re-feeding gastric residuals may replace partially digested milk, gastrointestinal enzymes, hormones (...) , and trophic substances that aid in digestion and promote gastrointestinal motility and maturation, re-feeding abnormal residuals may result in emesis, necrotising enterocolitis, or sepsis.To assess the efficacy and safety of re-feeding compared to discarding gastric residuals in preterm infants. The allocation should have been started in the first week of life and should have been continued at least until the baby reached full enteral feeds. The investigator could have chosen to discard the gastric

2019 Cochrane

2. Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. (PubMed)

Exposure to the smell and taste of milk to accelerate feeding in preterm infants. Preterm infants are often unable to co-ordinate sucking, swallowing and breathing for oral feeding because of their immaturity; in such cases, initial nutrition is provided by orogastric or nasogastric tube feeding. Feed intolerance is common and can delay attainment of full enteral feeds and sucking feeds, which prolongs the need for intravenous nutrition and hospital stay. Smell and taste play an important role (...) in the activation of physiological pre-absorptive processes that contribute to food digestion and absorption. However, during tube feedings, milk bypasses the nasal and oral cavities, which limits exposure to the smell and taste of milk. Provision of the smell and taste of milk with tube feedings is non-invasive and inexpensive; and if it does accelerate the transition to enteral feeds, and then to sucking feeds, it would be of considerable potential benefit to infants, their families, and the healthcare

2019 Cochrane

3. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) , 1675 infants).The GRADE certainty of evidence was moderate for rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth (downgraded for high levels of heterogeneity) and was moderate for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, moderate-certainty evidence indicates that feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results

2019 Cochrane

4. Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus maternal breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Artificial formula can be manipulated to contain higher amounts of macro-nutrients than maternal breast milk but breast milk confers important immuno-nutritional advantages for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants.To determine the effect of feeding preterm or LBW infants with formula compared with maternal breast milk on growth and developmental outcomes.We used the standard strategy of Cochrane Neonatal (...) to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2018, Issue 9), and Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid Maternity & Infant Care Database, and CINAHL to October 2018. We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula versus maternal breast milk.Two review authors planned independently to assess trial

2019 Cochrane

5. Instruments for assessing readiness to commence suck feeds in preterm infants: effects on time to establish full oral feeding and duration of hospitalisation. (PubMed)

Instruments for assessing readiness to commence suck feeds in preterm infants: effects on time to establish full oral feeding and duration of hospitalisation. One of the most challenging milestones for preterm infants is the acquisition of safe and efficient feeding skills. The majority of healthy full term infants are born with skills to coordinate their suck, swallow and respiration. However, this is not the case for preterm infants who develop these skills gradually as they transition from (...) tube feeding to suck feeds. For preterm infants the ability to engage in oral feeding behaviour is dependent on many factors. The complexity of factors influencing feeding readiness has led some researchers to investigate the use of an individualised assessment of an infant's abilities. A limited number of instruments that aim to indicate an individual infant's readiness to commence either breast or bottle feeding have been developed.To determine the effects of using a feeding readiness instrument

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Cochrane

6. Cup feeding versus other forms of supplemental enteral feeding for newborn infants unable to fully breastfeed. (PubMed)

Cup feeding versus other forms of supplemental enteral feeding for newborn infants unable to fully breastfeed. Breast milk provides optimal nutrition for term and preterm infants, and the ideal way for infants to receive breast milk is through suckling at the breast. Unfortunately, this may not always be possible for medical or physiological reasons such as being born sick or preterm and as a result requiring supplemental feeding. Currently, there are various ways in which infants can receive (...) supplemental feeds. Traditionally in neonatal and maternity units, bottles and nasogastric tubes have been used; however, cup feeding is becoming increasingly popular as a means of offering supplemental feeds in an attempt to improve breastfeeding rates. There is no consistency to guide the choice of method for supplemental feeding.To determine the effects of cup feeding versus other forms of supplemental enteral feeding on weight gain and achievement of successful breastfeeding in term and preterm infants

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Cochrane

7. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines

The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login Purchase options Connect (...) person_outline Login keyboard_arrow_down Individual Login Purchase options menu search Advertisement close The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy infant feeding for allergy prevention guidelines Preeti A Joshi, Jill Smith, Sandra Vale and Dianne E Campbell Med J Aust 2019; 210 (2): . || doi: 10.5694/mja2.12102 Published online: 14 January 2019 Topics Abstract Introduction: The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, the peak professional body for clinical immunology

2019 MJA Clinical Guidelines

8. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, alternative forms of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight (LBW) infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula. Donor breast milk may retain some of the non-nutritive benefits of maternal breast milk for preterm or LBW infants. However, feeding with artificial formula may ensure more consistent delivery of greater amounts of nutrients (...) for neurodevelopmental disability, all-cause mortality, and necrotising enterocolitis (downgraded for imprecision).In preterm and LBW infants, feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk, either as a supplement to maternal expressed breast milk or as a sole diet, results in higher rates of weight gain, linear growth, and head growth and a higher risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis. The trial data do not show an effect on all-cause mortality, or on long-term growth or neurodevelopment.

2018 Cochrane

11. Disorders of infant feeding

Disorders of infant feeding Disorders of infant feeding - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Disorders of infant feeding Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Common in children under 1 year of age. Causative conditions may persist, leading to ongoing feeding difficulties during childhood. Results in the inadequate intake or intolerance of fluids or nutrients necessary to meet (...) are guided by physical findings and severity of symptoms. Feeding disorders are usually subacute to chronic in nature. A sudden change in feeding habit may be associated with other conditions, notably infections, which need to be excluded. Definition Conditions that lead to inadequate intake or intolerance of fluids and nutrients in infants under 1 year of age. Milnes SM, Piazza CC, Carroll-Hernandez TA. Assessment and treatment of pediatric feeding disorders. Encyclopedia on early childhood development

2018 BMJ Best Practice

12. Women, family, practitioners and service providers' views about infant feeding (breastfeeding, use of breast milk substitutes or mixed feeding), when a mother or infant is known or suspected of having a transmissible disease: a best fit framework synthesi

Women, family, practitioners and service providers' views about infant feeding (breastfeeding, use of breast milk substitutes or mixed feeding), when a mother or infant is known or suspected of having a transmissible disease: a best fit framework synthesi Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied

2019 PROSPERO

13. Feed thickener for infants up to six months of age with gastro-oesophageal reflux. (PubMed)

Feed thickener for infants up to six months of age with gastro-oesophageal reflux. Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is common in infants, and feed thickeners are often used to manage it in infants as they are simple to use and perceived to be harmless. However, conflicting evidence exists to support the use of feed thickeners.To evaluate the use of feed thickeners in infants up to six months of age with GOR in terms of reduction in a) signs and symptoms of GOR, b) reflux episodes on pH probe (...) for randomised controlled trials.We included randomised controlled trials if they examined the effects of feed thickeners as compared to unthickened feeds (no treatment or placebo) in treating GOR in term infants up to six months of age or six months of corrected gestational age for those born preterm.Two review authors independently identified eligible studies from the literature search. Two review authors independently performed data extraction and quality assessments of the eligible studies. Differences

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Cochrane

14. High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. (PubMed)

High versus standard volume enteral feeds to promote growth in preterm or low birth weight infants. Breast milk alone, given at standard recommended volumes (150 to 180 mL/kg/d), is not adequate to meet the protein, energy, and other nutrient requirements of growing preterm or low birth weight infants. One strategy that may be used to address these potential nutrient deficits is to give infants enteral feeds in excess of 200 mL/kg/d ('high-volume' feeds). This approach may increase nutrient (...) uptake and growth rates, but concerns include that high-volume enteral feeds may cause feed intolerance, gastro-oesophageal reflux, aspiration pneumonia, necrotising enterocolitis, or complications related to fluid overload, including patent ductus arteriosus and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.To assess the effect on growth and safety of feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with high (> 200 mL/kg/d) versus standard (≤ 200 mL/kg/d) volume of enteral feeds. Infants in intervention and control groups

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Cochrane

15. Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs

Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library (...) Management You did not add any article to your library yet. × User Password Log in × Reset password If you need to reset your password please enter your email and click the Send button. You will receive an email to complete the process. Email Send × Library Management × March 2017. Volume 13. Number 1 Among extremely low birth weight infants, exclusive maternal feeding decreases necrotizing enterocolitis risk, mortality and health costs Rating: 0 (0 Votes) Reviewers: , . | Newsletter Free Subscription

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

16. Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question

Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents? Infant Feeding Practices: A Focused Practice Question Effectiveness of Text Messaging Interventions Designed to Influence Parents’ Infant Feeding Practices A Focused Practice Question Sarah Lamontagne, Public Health Nutritionist Nicole Labrie, Supervisor February 2017 i Table of Contents Key Messages 1 Issue & Context 2 Literature Review Question 3 Literature Search 4 Relevance Assessment 4 Results of the Search 5 (...) information that results in improved health outcomes and/or changed health behaviors. 2. There is limited research on text messaging specifically to the target audience of parents with the goal of influencing their infant feeding practices. 3. Breastfeeding initiation and breastfeeding exclusivity maintenance can be improved with the use of text messaging interventions for parents. 4. The limited research available supports Peel Public Health in pursuing the development and evaluation of an intervention

2018 Peel Health Library

17. HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance

HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance The duration of breastfeeding and support from health services to improve feeding practices among mothers living with HIV HIV AND INFANT FEEDING IN EMERGENCIES: OPERATIONAL GUIDANCEHIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance© World Health Organization 2018 Some rights reserved. This work is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO licence (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO; https (...) . HIV and infant feeding in emergencies: operational guidance. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2018. Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO. Cataloguing-in-Publication (CIP) data. CIP data are available at http://apps.who.int/iris. Sales, rights and licensing. To purchase WHO publications, see http://apps.who.int/bookorders. To submit requests for commercial use and queries on rights and licensing, see http://www.who.int/about/licensing. Third-party materials. If you wish to reuse material from this work

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

18. Early discharge with home support of gavage feeding for stable preterm infants who have not established full oral feeds. (PubMed)

Early discharge with home support of gavage feeding for stable preterm infants who have not established full oral feeds. Early discharge of stable preterm infants still requiring gavage feeds offers the benefits of uniting families sooner and reducing healthcare and family costs compared with discharge home when on full sucking feeds. Potential disadvantages of early discharge include increased care burden for the family and risk of complications related to gavage feeding.To determine (...) the effects of a policy of early discharge of stable preterm infants with home support of gavage feeding compared with a policy of discharge of such infants when they have reached full sucking feeds.We planned subgroup analyses to determine whether safety and efficacy outcomes are altered by the type of support received (outpatient visits vs home support) or by the maturity of the infants discharged (gestational age ≤ 28 weeks at birth or birth weight ≤ 1000 grams).We used the standard search strategy

2015 Cochrane

19. Responsive versus scheduled feeding for preterm infants. (PubMed)

Responsive versus scheduled feeding for preterm infants. Feeding preterm infants in response to their hunger and satiation cues (responsive, cue-based, or infant-led feeding) rather than at scheduled intervals might enhance infants' and parents' experience and satisfaction, help in the establishment of independent oral feeding, increase nutrient intake and growth rates, and allow earlier hospital discharge.To assess the effect of a policy of feeding preterm infants on a responsive basis versus (...) of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials.Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared a policy of feeding preterm infants on a responsive basis versus feeding at scheduled intervals.Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias and undertook data extraction independently. We analysed the treatment effects in the individual trials and reported the risk ratio and risk difference for dichotomous data and mean difference (MD

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Cochrane

20. Oral stimulation for promoting oral feeding in preterm infants. (PubMed)

Oral stimulation for promoting oral feeding in preterm infants. Preterm infants (< 37 weeks' postmenstrual age) are often delayed in attaining oral feeding. Normal oral feeding is suggested as an important outcome for the timing of discharge from the hospital and can be an early indicator of neuromotor integrity and developmental outcomes. A range of oral stimulation interventions may help infants to develop sucking and oromotor co-ordination, promoting earlier oral feeding and earlier hospital (...) discharge.To determine the effectiveness of oral stimulation interventions for attainment of oral feeding in preterm infants born before 37 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA).To conduct subgroup analyses for the following prespecified subgroups.• Extremely preterm infants born at < 28 weeks' PMA.• Very preterm infants born from 28 to < 32 weeks' PMA.• Infants breast-fed exclusively.• Infants bottle-fed exclusively.• Infants who were both breast-fed and bottle-fed.We used the standard search strategy

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Cochrane

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>