How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

873 results for

Infant Car Seat

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Preventive effects of car safety seat use on clinical outcomes in infants and young children with road traffic injuries: A 7-year observational study. (Abstract)

Preventive effects of car safety seat use on clinical outcomes in infants and young children with road traffic injuries: A 7-year observational study. Road traffic injury (RTI) is one of the major mechanisms of injury leading to high disability and case-fatality in infants and children. Proper car safety seat use can reduce fatal outcomes in pediatric patients with RTI; however, the use rate is still low. This study aimed to measure the preventive effects of car safety seat use on clinical (...) outcomes among infants and young children injured from RTI.A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted using the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance (EDIIS) registry from 23 EDs between Jan 2010 and Dec 2016. All pediatric patients who were under 6 years of age and who sustained RTI in a vehicle with fewer than 10-seats were eligible. Primary and secondary endpoints were intracranial injury and mortality. We calculated the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of the car safety seat

2018 Injury

2. Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks? gestational age)

likely to experience oxygen desaturation and/or bradycardia than when they are supine, neither positioning predicts an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome or mortality post-discharge. A review of the literature yielded insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of the infant car seat challenge as part of discharge planning for preterm infants. This finding has prompted a change in recommendation from a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement published in 2000. Key Words: Apnea (...) Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks? gestational age) Preterm infants younger than 37 weeks corrected gestational age are at increased risk for abnormal control of respiration. The infant car seat challenge has been used as a screening tool to ensure cardiorespiratory stability before discharging preterm infants from many hospitals in Canada. While it is clear that infants placed in a car seat are more

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

3. Side impact motor vehicle crashes: driver, passenger, vehicle and crash characteristics for fatally and nonfatally-injured rear-seated adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

Side impact motor vehicle crashes: driver, passenger, vehicle and crash characteristics for fatally and nonfatally-injured rear-seated adults Most studies of rear-seated occupants have focused on or included pediatric occupants which may not translate to adults. This study examines passenger, driver, vehicle and crash characteristics for rear-seated adult occupants involved in side crashes.The National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates System (NASS/GES) for calendar years 2011-2014 (...) was used with accompanying weights to examine the occupant, vehicle and crash characteristics associated with injury in rear-seated adults (n = 395,504) involved in a side crash. A weighted subpopulation analysis includes occupants travelling in a vehicle with an IIHS safety rating (n = 39,208), which was used to control for vehicle safety. Statistical analysis used Chi-square tests and multilevel multivariable logistic regression. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) are reported with 95

2016 Injury epidemiology

4. Facilitators and barriers to use of seat restraints for children traveling in motor vehicles: qualitative evidence syntheses

Facilitators and barriers to use of seat restraints for children traveling in motor vehicles: qualitative evidence syntheses Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne (...) , timing of administration, frequency of administration, route of administration, vehicle. ">Data to be extracted: intervention of interest Example: Serum creatinine; continuous; umol/L (may be recalculated from mg/dL). ">Data to be extracted: primary outcome(s) Example: Blood urea nitrogen; continuous; mmol/L (may be recalculated from mg/dL); Renal histological damage as assessed by Jablonski scale; continuous; Jablonski score. ">Data to be extracted: secondary outcome(s) Example: 1st author, year

2018 PROSPERO

5. A Paper-Based Car Seat Safety Educational Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Department. (Abstract)

A Paper-Based Car Seat Safety Educational Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Department. Motor vehicle crashes are a leading source of pediatric morbidity and mortality in children younger than 13 years. Proper car seat safety device (CSD) markedly reduces mortality, but the majority of families misuse them. Emergency department (ED)-based educational interventions can improve knowledge patient regarding proper CSD use but historically have been resource intensive. Our study evaluated (...) the utility of a novel educational intervention in improving patient knowledge of proper CSD use and in evaluating for proper CSD installation.Parents of children younger than 14 years presenting to the ED were given a paper-based quiz followed by a CSD-educational handout. Improvement in patient knowledge and evaluation for proper CSD installation were evaluated by repeat quiz and a phone-based survey 2 to 4 weeks later.Parents exhibited an 18% improvement in quiz answers evaluating knowledge of proper

2019 Pediatric Emergency Care

6. Results of an RCT in Two Pediatric Emergency Departments to Evaluate the Efficacy of an m-Health Educational App on Car Seat Use. (Abstract)

follow-up surveys at 3 and 6 months were conducted.Data were collected from June 2014 to September 2016 from a sample of parents with children aged 4-7 years recruited from a pediatric emergency department in an East Coast urban area and one in a Midwest semi-rural area.A theory-based, stage-tailored educational program, Safety in Seconds v2.0TM, delivered on a mobile app.Four car seat behaviors: (1) having the correct restraint for the child's age and weight; (2) having the child ride (...) Results of an RCT in Two Pediatric Emergency Departments to Evaluate the Efficacy of an m-Health Educational App on Car Seat Use. The growing interest in incorporating prevention into emergency health care make it timely to examine the use of computer technology to efficiently deliver effective education in this setting.This RCT compared results from an intervention group (n=367) that received child passenger safety information, to an attention-matched control (n=375). A baseline survey and two

2018 American journal of preventive medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. Factors Associated With Unrestrained Young Passengers in Motor Vehicle Crashes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Factors Associated With Unrestrained Young Passengers in Motor Vehicle Crashes. : media-1vid110.1542/5984244682001PEDS-VA_2018-2507Video Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Unrestrained child passengers are at significant risk of crash-related injury. Previous researchers using nationally representative crash data from 1992 to 1993 found an association between driver and passenger safety-belt use. Our objective in this study is to investigate factors associated with young, unrestrained (...) predictor of the child passenger also being unrestrained. Policy and regulation to better ensure that drivers are properly restrained (eg, expanding primary seat-belt laws to all states) may serve as effective means for increasing rates of proper child-occupant-restraint use.Copyright © 2019 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

2019 Pediatrics

8. Does the ?Seatbelt Sign? predict intra-abdominal injury after motor vehicle trauma in children?

Does the ?Seatbelt Sign? predict intra-abdominal injury after motor vehicle trauma in children? BestBets: Does the ‘Seatbelt Sign’ predict intra-abdominal injury after motor vehicle trauma in children? Does the ‘Seatbelt Sign’ predict intra-abdominal injury after motor vehicle trauma in children? Report By: Landen Rentmeester - Emergency Medicine Resident Search checked by James DeCou, MD - Pediatric Trauma Director, Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital Institution: Grand Rapids Medical Education (...) Partners/Michigan State University Date Submitted: 13th September 2011 Date Completed: 13th February 2012 Last Modified: 15th February 2012 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [children involved in motor vehicle trauma] is the [seat belt sign] predictive of [significant intra-abdominal injury]? Clinical Scenario A 9-year-old boy presents to the Emergency Department (ED) following a motor vehicle collision. He was a restrained rear seated passenger involved in a head on crash

2012 BestBETS

9. Overcoming barriers to use of child car seats in an urban Aboriginal community—formative evaluation of a program for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Full Text available with Trip Pro

and acceptability of a program intended to improve optimal use of child car seats.Focus groups were conducted with parents and carers of Aboriginal children to identify the barriers and facilitating factors for child car seat use, and staff of two ACCHS were interviewed to inform program development. Following the implementation of the resulting multi-faceted program, consisting of staff training, education, hands-on demonstrations and a subsidised car seat distribution scheme, interviews were conducted (...) to assess process issues and acceptability with 13 staff members.Parents and carers in the focus groups reported a lack of awareness of child car seat use, confusion about the right car seats for different aged children but agreed about the importance of safety and community responsibility to keep children safe in cars. Interviews with service staff informed an approach to deliver relevant information. Information and resources were delivered to families, while the car seat distribution scheme supplied

2018 Pilot and feasibility studies

10. Physical Examination is the Best Predictor of the Need for Abdominal Surgery in Children Following Motor Vehicle Collision. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Physical Examination is the Best Predictor of the Need for Abdominal Surgery in Children Following Motor Vehicle Collision. Exploratory laparotomy in children after motor vehicle collision (MVC) is rare. In the absence of definitive hemorrhage or free abdominal air on radiographic imaging, predictors for operative exploration are conflicting.The purpose of this study was to explore objective findings that may aid in determining which children require operative abdominal exploration after (...) . There were no significant differences in trauma laboratory values or radiographic findings between the 2 groups.Data from this study solidify the relationship between specific physical examination findings and the need for abdominal exploration after MVC in children. In addition, these data suggest that a lack of the seat belt sign, abdominal bruising, abdominal wounds, or abdominal tenderness are individually predictive of patients who will not require surgical intervention.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

2017 Journal of Emergency Medicine

11. Fetal closed head injuries following maternal motor vehicle accident: A clinicopathologic case report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Fetal closed head injuries following maternal motor vehicle accident: A clinicopathologic case report. The clinicopathologic appearance of fetal closed head injury (FCHI) due to a maternal motor vehicle accident has not been fully investigated because of its extreme rarity.A 22-year-old woman at 31 weeks of gestation was riding in the front passenger seat of a car, and another rightward-turning car struck the right side of her vehicle.Uterine injury with placental abruption was strongly (...) suspected.A live female infant in breech presentation was delivered by emergency caesarean section.Although the female infant was and showed no evidence of trauma on her body surface. She exhibited a convulsion on the day of birth, and subsequent ultrasonography revealed possible intracranial hemorrhage. Although laboratory parameters associated with circulatory and respiratory function suggested a good response to the intensive care administered during the treatment course, the infant died 6 days later

2018 Medicine

12. Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection Full Text available with Trip Pro

Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection 29374082 2018 10 30 1475-5785 24 1 2018 02 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention Inj. Prev. Retraction: Car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection . e2 10.1136/ip.2006.015115ret Henary B B Center for Applied Biomechanics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Sherwood C P CP Center for Applied Biomechanics, University (...) of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Crandall J R JR Center for Applied Biomechanics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA jrc2h@virginia.edu. Kent R W RW Center for Applied Biomechanics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Vaca F E FE Center for Trauma and Injury Prevention Research, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. Arbogast K B KB Center for Injury Research and Prevention, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Bull M J MJ Department

2017 Injury Prevention

13. Rear-Facing Car Safety Seat Use for Children 18 Months of Age: Prevalence and Determinants. (Abstract)

reported having discussed car seats with their child's provider (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1-2.6); receiving their child's primary care in pediatrics compared with family practice clinics (aOR 2.4; 95% CI 1.1-2.6); and being aware of the American Academy of Pediatrics rear-facing recommendation (aOR 2.8; 95% CI 1.8-4.1) were significantly more likely to report rear-facing car safety seat use. Conversely, caregivers who previously used a car seat with another child were less likely to have their child rear (...) facing at 18 months of age (aOR 0.6; 95% CI  0.4-0.9).A large proportion of children were forward facing at 18 months of age. Future efforts focused on encouraging providers to discuss car seats during patient visits, increasing awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics' rear-facing recommendation, and targeting high-risk populations may improve the prevalence of children who remain rear facing until 2 years of age.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2017 Journal of Pediatrics

14. Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection Full Text available with Trip Pro

Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection 28667167 2018 06 26 1475-5785 23 4 2017 08 Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention Inj. Prev. Expression of concern: car safety seats for children: rear facing for best protection. e1 10.1136/ip.2006.015115eoc1 eng Letter Expression of Concern 2017 06 30 England Inj Prev 9510056 1353-8047 Inj Prev. 2007 Dec;13(6):398-402 18056317 amputation concussion

2017 Injury Prevention

15. “He’s the Number One Thing in My World”: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to Explore Child Car Seat Use in a Regional Community in New South Wales Full Text available with Trip Pro

“He’s the Number One Thing in My World”: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to Explore Child Car Seat Use in a Regional Community in New South Wales We explored the factors influencing the use of age-appropriate car seats in a community with a high proportion of Aboriginal families in regional New South Wales. We conducted a survey and three focus groups with parents of children aged 3-5 years enrolled at three early learning centres on the Australian south-east coast. Survey data (...) were triangulated with qualitative data from focus groups and analysed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED conceptual framework. Of the 133 eligible families, 97 (73%) parents completed the survey including 31% of parents who reported their children were Aboriginal. Use of age-appropriate car seats was reported by 80 (83%) of the participants, and awareness of the child car seat legislation was high (91/97, 94%). Children aged 2-3 years were less likely reported to be restrained in an age-appropriate car

2017 International journal of environmental research and public health

16. Thematic Review of Deaths in Teenagers in Motor Vehicles

Background In the pilot phase of the National Child Death Review (CDR) programme, the need for a review of deaths of children and young people in motor vehicles was identi? ed. The CDR Programme is being re-established in Wales. The aim of the programme is to identify and describe patterns and causes of child death, including any trends, and to recommend actions to reduce the risk of avoidable contributory factors. One of the objectives of the programme is to undertake thematic reviews and make (...) Group.Thematic review of deaths of teenagers aged 13 to 17 years in motor vehicles 5 3 Findings The panel were presented with data on 28 crashes, where 90 people were injured, 45 of them fatally (? gure 1). All of the fatalities were in cars. Thirty four of the fatalities were aged 13 to 17 years (teens) 1 . Seventeen of 25 teen passenger fatalities were being driven by a 17 to 19 year old, seven of 25 were being driven by someone aged 20 or over. This review focussed on these cases of deaths of children

2013 Public Health Wales Observatory Evidence Service

17. Car seat education: A randomized controlled trial of teaching methods. (Abstract)

, Simple Steps to Child Passenger Safety, utilizing social learning principles. Proficiency in child passenger safety was evaluated pre- and post-class via: (1) 5-question confidence assessment; (2) 15-question knowledge test; and (3) 5-part car seat installation demonstration. Data were analyzed to compare post-class assessment scores between teaching modalities using pre-test scores as covariates, and correlation of participant confidence and knowledge with installation ability.526 individuals (...) = 0.964). Among participants with high scores on the knowledge assessment, only 57% could demonstrate correct car seat installation (rs = 0.160, p = 0.023).Video-based social learning methodology, which requires less time and resources, was as effective in teaching child passenger safety as didactic lecture. Both teaching methods significantly improved proficiency in child passenger restraint. Car seat installation knowledge is only weakly correlated with proper installation ability and proper

2018 Injury Controlled trial quality: uncertain

18. Infant Car Seat

Infant Car Seat Infant Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Infant Car Seat Infant Car Seat Aka: Infant Car Seat (...) , Car seat for infants From Related Chapters II. Indications Newborns Infants under 20 to 22 pounds (under age 1 year) Infants head must be >1 inch below top of seat III. Positioning Seat always faces rear Semi-reclined position (45 degrees) maintains airway Rear-facing position supports head and neck Front-facing does not offer head and neck support Rear-facing position continued until Child over age 2 years and Child weight over 20 pounds Harness straps should be at or below level Carrier handle

2018 FP Notebook

19. Child Convertible Car Seat

Convertible Car Seat Aka: Child Convertible Car Seat , Convertible Child Seat From Related Chapters II. Indications Infants (rear facing until age 2 years and 20 pounds) Children (forward facing) Used up to 40 pounds and 4 years old Childs ear level should be below top of seat III. Types: Convertible Car Seats Five Point Harness (preferred for safety) Five straps: 2 , 2 leg, 1 crotch Best protection against for all children Best fit of convertible s for small infants T-Shield Plastic T-shaped yoke buckles (...) Child Convertible Car Seat Child Convertible Car Seat Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Child Convertible Car Seat Child

2018 FP Notebook

20. Car Seat Tolerance Screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Failure Rates, Risk Factors, and Adverse Outcomes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Car Seat Tolerance Screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Failure Rates, Risk Factors, and Adverse Outcomes. To characterize the epidemiology of Car Seat Tolerance Screening (CSTS) failure and the association between test failure and all-cause 30-day postdischarge mortality or hospital readmission in a large, multicenter cohort of preterm infants receiving neonatal intensive care.This retrospective cohort study used the prospectively collected Optum Neonatal Database. Study infants were (...) born at <37 weeks of gestation between 2010 and 2016. We identified independent predictors of CSTS failure and calculated the risk-adjusted odds of all-cause 30-day mortality or hospital readmission associated with test failure.Of 7899 infants cared for in 788 hospitals, 334 (4.2%) failed initial CSTS. Greater postmenstrual age at testing and African American race were independently associated with decreased failure risk. Any treatment with an antacid medication, concurrent use of caffeine

2017 Journal of Pediatrics

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>