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Hypnosis in Labor

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1. Hypnosis in Labor

in Labor , Hypnosis in Child Birth From Related Chapters II. Mechanism Altered or special state of consciousness Hyper-response to suggestion III. Efficacy Shown to speed Decreased need for Enhance feelings of positivity Patient dependent Very suggestible: 15% Difficult to hypnotize: 15% IV. Technique Trial method first in clinic at 34 weeks Determine susceptibility to Sway or hand lightening technique Remove misconceptions Promote patient control Induction Deepening Imagery "Special Place" Music can (...) Hypnosis in Labor Hypnosis in Labor Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hypnosis in Labor Hypnosis in Labor Aka: Hypnosis

2018 FP Notebook

2. Labor Dystocia

Labor Dystocia Labor Dystocia Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 226 RComparative Effectiveness Review Number 226 Labor Dystocia Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00004-I Prepared by: Duke Evidence-based Practice Center Durham, NC Investigators: Evan R. Myers, M.D., M.P.H. Gillian D. Sanders, Ph.D. Remy R. Coeytaux, M.D., Ph.D. Kara A. McElligott, M.D (...) ., M.P.H. Patricia G. Moorman, Ph.D., M.S.P.H. Karen Hicklin, Ph.D. Chad Grotegut, M.D., M.H.Sc. Margaret Villers, M.D. Adam Goode, D.P.T, Ph.D. Hilary Campbell, Pharm.D., J.D. Deanna Befus, Ph.D. Amanda J. McBroom, Ph.D. J. Kelly Davis, B.A. Kathryn Lallinger, M.S.L.S. Robyn Fortman, B.A. Andrzej Kosinski, Ph.D. AHRQ Publication No. 20-EHC007 May 2020 ii Key Messages Purpose of Review To review the evidence on the definition of “normal” labor progression and the comparative effectiveness of different

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

3. Physiologic Basis of Pain in Labour and Delivery: An Evidence-Based Approach to its Management

of nonpharmacological approaches to pain management. Options Nonpharmacological methods available for pain management during labour and delivery exist. These should be included in the counselling and care of women. Evidence PubMed and Medline were searched for articles in French and English on subjects related to “breastfeeding,” “pain,” “epidural,” “anaesthesia,” “analgesia,” “labour,” “labor,” and combined with “gate control theory,” “alternative therapies,” “massage,” “position,” “mobility,” “TENS,” “bathing (...) stimulations at any site on the body for the duration of each painful contraction) is best achieved through acupressure, sterile water injections, or deep massage (I). 6. The Central Nervous System Control mechanism, which consists of deviating or focussing the woman's attention is best activated through labour support and the practice of yoga, relaxation, visualization, breathing, auto-hypnosis and cognitive restructuring (I). 7. Continuous labour support, as part of nonpharmacological approaches to pain

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

4. CRACKCast E180 – Labor & Delivery

are overrepresented in the ED population. While we want to transfer all pregnant women to an obstetric centre, in some situations this is the WRONG decision 1) Describe the difference between false and true labor Whenever a woman in the third trimester shows up to the ER: ask whether this could be labour. A wide array of nonspecific symptoms may herald the onset of labor. Abdominal pain, back pain, cramping, nausea, vomiting, urinary urgency, stress incontinence, and anxiety can be symptoms of labor. After 24 (...) ● Progression ● Bloody show / mucus ● Plug expelled ● Cervical dilation and/or effacement (first stage of labour) When in doubt, ask for obstetric assessment; wait and see; and get fetal/electrical monitoring! 2) Describe the 4 phases of labor Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Latent phase Active phase (cervix >3cm) ● Where we determine what the presenting part is Fully dilated cervix Urge to push Usually lasts < 1 hr Get ready for delivery! Signs of placental separation include the following: the uterus

2018 CandiEM

5. Predicting Deep Hypnotic State From Sleep Brain Rhythms Using Deep Learning: A Data-Repurposing Approach. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predicting Deep Hypnotic State From Sleep Brain Rhythms Using Deep Learning: A Data-Repurposing Approach. Brain monitors tracking quantitative brain activities from electroencephalogram (EEG) to predict hypnotic levels have been proposed as a labor-saving alternative to behavioral assessments. Expensive clinical trials are required to validate any newly developed processed EEG monitor for every drug and combinations of drugs due to drug-specific EEG patterns. There is a need for an alternative (...) , efficient, and economical method.Using deep learning algorithms, we developed a novel data-repurposing framework to predict hypnotic levels from sleep brain rhythms. We used an online large sleep data set (5723 clinical EEGs) for training the deep learning algorithm and a clinical trial hypnotic data set (30 EEGs) for testing during dexmedetomidine infusion. Model performance was evaluated using accuracy and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC).The deep learning model

2020 Anesthesia and Analgesia

6. Unexpected consequences: women's experiences of a self-hypnosis intervention to help with pain relief during labour. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Unexpected consequences: women's experiences of a self-hypnosis intervention to help with pain relief during labour. Self-hypnosis is becoming increasingly popular as a means of labour pain management. Previous studies have produced mixed results. There are very few data on women's views and experiences of using hypnosis in this context. As part of a randomized controlled trial of self-hypnosis for intra-partum pain relief (the SHIP Trial) we conducted qualitative interviews with women (...) randomized to the intervention arm to explore their views and experiences of using self-hypnosis during labour and birth.Participants were randomly selected from the intervention arm of the study, which consisted of two antenatal self-hypnosis training sessions and a supporting CD that women were encouraged to listen to daily from 32 weeks gestation until the birth of their baby. Those who consented were interviewed in their own homes 8-12 weeks after birth. Following transcription, the interviews were

2015 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth Controlled trial quality: uncertain

7. Guideline supplement: Induction of labour

Guideline supplement: Induction of labour Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 1 of 16 Maternity and Neonatal C linical G uideline Queensland Health Guideline Supplement: Induction of labour Queensland Clinical Guideline Supplement: Induction of labour Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 2 of 16 Table of Contents List of Tables 2 1 Introduction 3 1.1 Funding 3 1.2 Conflict of interest 3 1.3 Guideline review 3 2 Methodology 5 2.1 Topic (...) of this licence contact: Intellectual Property Officer, Queensland Health, GPO Box 48, Brisbane Qld 4001, email ip_officer@health.qld.gov.au, phone (07) 3234 1479. Queensland Clinical Guideline Supplement: Induction of labour Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 3 of 16 1 Introduction This document is a supplement to the Queensland Clinical Guideline (QCG) Induction of labour. It provides supplementary information regarding guideline development, makes summary recommendations

2017 Queensland Health

8. Using a bath or pool during first stage labour: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

› Support person › Pethidine › Aromatherapy › Acupuncture and acupressure › Hypnosis › TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) › Psychological and breathing methods › Heat packs › Sterile water injections › Morphine › Gas (Entonox ® or nitrous oxide) If you choose, you may enter the bath or pool whenever you feel the need. Some hospital policies suggest that women wait to enter the water until their contractions are strongly established to avoid labour slowing or stopping. There is no high (...) . No.: CD009234. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009234.pub2 [2] Melzack, R. The Myth of Painless Childbirth. Operative Obstetrics and Anesthesia, 1984. 19(321): p. 297-298. [3] McCrea, B. H. and Wright, M. E. Satisfaction in childbirth and perceptions of personal control in pain relief during labour. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 1999. 29(4): p. 877–884. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.1999.00961 [4] Chang, M.Y., C.-H. Chen, and K.-F. Huang, (2006 ) A Comparison of Massage Effects on Labor Pain Using the McGill Pain

2015 EUnetHTA

9. Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth

for women in labour: an overview of systematic. reviews. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD009234. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009234.pub2. [2] Chang, M.Y., C.-H. Chen, and K.-F. Huang, A Comparison of Massage Effects on Labor Pain Using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Journal of Nursing Research, 2006. 14(3): p.190-197. [3] Brown, S.T., D. Campbell, and A. Kurtz, Characteristics of labor pain at two stages of cervical dilation. Pain, 1989. 39(3): p. 289-295. [4] Gaston (...) Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birth Choosing your positions during labour and birth: A decision aid for women having a vaginal birthThis decision aid has been written to support women who are planning a vaginal birth to know what to expect and to have a say in making decisions about positions in labour and birth. This decision aid provides information about two options: 1. Being upright 2 Lying down This decision aid will also answer

2015 EUnetHTA

10. Pain management for women in labour: an overview of systematic reviews. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, relaxation, non-opioids) when compared with placebo or standard care. Relaxation was associated with fewer assisted vaginal births and acupuncture was associated with fewer assisted vaginal births and caesarean sections.INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCEThere is insufficient evidence to make judgements on whether or not hypnosis, biofeedback, sterile water injection, aromatherapy, TENS, or parenteral opioids are more effective than placebo or other interventions for pain management in labour. In comparison with other (...) Pain management for women in labour: an overview of systematic reviews. The pain that women experience during labour is affected by multiple physiological and psychosocial factors and its intensity can vary greatly.  Most women in labour require pain relief. Pain management strategies include non-pharmacological interventions (that aim to help women cope with pain in labour) and pharmacological interventions (that aim to relieve the pain of labour).To summarise the evidence from Cochrane

2012 Cochrane

11. Effect of self-hypnosis on duration of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes: A randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effect of self-hypnosis on duration of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes: A randomized controlled trial. To examine the effect of a brief course in self-hypnosis for childbirth on duration of the labor and other birth outcomes.A randomized, controlled, single-blind trial.Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Denmark.A total of 1222 healthy nulliparous women.A hypnosis group receiving three 1-h lessons in self-hypnosis with additional audio-recordings to ease childbirth, a relaxation group (...) receiving three 1-h lessons in various relaxation methods and mindfulness with audio-recordings for additional training, and a usual-care group receiving only the usual antenatal care were compared.Duration of labor, birth complications, lactation success, caring for the child, and preferred future mode of delivery.No differences were found across the three groups on duration from arriving at the birth department until the expulsive phase of second stage of labor, the duration of the expulsive phase

2013 Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica Controlled trial quality: uncertain

12. Self-hypnosis for coping with labour pain: a randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Self-hypnosis for coping with labour pain: a randomised controlled trial. To estimate the use of epidural analgesia and experienced pain during childbirth after a short antenatal training course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth.Randomised, controlled, single-blinded trial using a three-arm design.Aarhus University Hospital Skejby in Denmark during the period July 2009 until August 2011.A total of 1222 healthy nulliparous women.Use of epidural analgesia and self-reported pain during delivery (...) was compared in three groups: a hypnosis group receiving three 1-hour lessons in self-hypnosis with additional audiorecordings to ease childbirth, a relaxation group receiving three 1-hour lessons in various relaxation methods and mindfulness with audiorecordings for additional training, and a usual care group receiving ordinary antenatal care only.Use of epidural analgesia. Secondary outcomes included self-reported pain.There were no between-group differences in use of epidural analgesia-31.2% (95

2013 BJOG Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. Comparison of Epidural Labor Analgesia With Dexmedetomidine or Sufentanil

to Share IPD: No Layout table for additional information Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No Keywords provided by Zeyong Yang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine: Labor, Analgesia, Dexmedetomidine, Sufentanil Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Dexmedetomidine Sufentanil Ropivacaine Hypnotics and Sedatives Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs Analgesics, Non-Narcotic Analgesics (...) Comparison of Epidural Labor Analgesia With Dexmedetomidine or Sufentanil Comparison of Epidural Labor Analgesia With Dexmedetomidine or Sufentanil - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparison

2018 Clinical Trials

14. WHO recommendations for augmentation of labour

WHO recommendations for augmentation of labour WHO recommendations for WHO recommendations for augmentation of labourWHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data WHO recommendations for augmentation of labour. 1.Dystocia – prevention and control. 2.Labor, Induced – methods. 3.Labor, Induced - standards. 4.Labor Presentation. 5.Perinatal Care – methods. 6.Guideline. I.World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 150736 3 (NLM classification: WQ 440) © World Health Organization 2014 All rights (...) recommendations for augmentation of labour: evidence base, which can be accessed online at www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/maternal_perinatal/augmentation-labour. Table of Contents Acknowledgements 1 Acronyms and abbreviations 2 Executive summary 3 Introduction 3 Guideline development methods 3 Guiding principles 4 Summary list of WHO recommendations for augmentation of labour 5 1. Background 6 1.1 Target audience 6 2. Methods 7 2.1 Declaration of interests by participants at the WHO technical

2014 World Health Organisation Guidelines

15. Hypnosis for induction of labour [Cochrane Protocol]

Hypnosis for induction of labour [Cochrane Protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing

2015 PROSPERO

16. Hypnosis in Labor

in Labor , Hypnosis in Child Birth From Related Chapters II. Mechanism Altered or special state of consciousness Hyper-response to suggestion III. Efficacy Shown to speed Decreased need for Enhance feelings of positivity Patient dependent Very suggestible: 15% Difficult to hypnotize: 15% IV. Technique Trial method first in clinic at 34 weeks Determine susceptibility to Sway or hand lightening technique Remove misconceptions Promote patient control Induction Deepening Imagery "Special Place" Music can (...) Hypnosis in Labor Hypnosis in Labor Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hypnosis in Labor Hypnosis in Labor Aka: Hypnosis

2015 FP Notebook

17. Hypnosis in Labor Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hypnosis in Labor The pregnant woman who appears at the doctor's office is not only someone with a condition that will deliver in nine months, but has a specific psyche relating to her condition, to her doctor and to her environment.During the prenatal period the patient has the chance, if allowed, to set up a rapport with, and trust in, her doctor which if encouraged will allow for freer and easier communication both before, during and after labor. It is with the knowledge (...) of this communication and its use, while the patient is in the hypnotic state, that the doctor may help his patients achieve therapeutic goals. Great care should be used in the choice of words in communicating with potential aborters, and women subject to premature labor. In many instances, the family physician is the ideal specialist since he can detect emotional disorders at the earliest time. Frequently, he can incorporate psychotherapeutic treatment into medical treatment.Hypnosis allows the physician to apply

1970 Canadian Family Physician

18. Some Objective and Subjective Characteristics of Labour Influenced by Personality, and Their Modification by Hypnosis or Relaxation Full Text available with Trip Pro

Some Objective and Subjective Characteristics of Labour Influenced by Personality, and Their Modification by Hypnosis or Relaxation 14152940 1996 12 01 2018 12 01 0035-9157 57 1964 Apr Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. SOME OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF LABOUR INFLUENCED BY PERSONALITY, AND THEIR MODIFICATION BY HYPNOSIS OR RELAXATION. 261-2 FURNEAUX W D WD CHAPPLE P A PA eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 OM Female Humans (...) Hypnosis Labor, Obstetric Personality Pregnancy Psychology Relaxation HYPNOSIS LABOR PREGNANCY PSYCHOLOGY RELAXATION 1964 4 1 1964 4 1 0 1 1964 4 1 0 0 ppublish 14152940 PMC1897949

1964 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

19. An Assessment of the Value of Hypnosis in Pregnancy and Labour Full Text available with Trip Pro

An Assessment of the Value of Hypnosis in Pregnancy and Labour 13883794 1998 11 01 2018 12 01 0007-1447 2 5310 1962 Oct 13 British medical journal Br Med J An assessment of the value of hypnosis in pregnancy and labour. 951-3 DAVIDSON J A JA eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 OM Female Humans Hypnosis Labor, Obstetric Pregnancy Work HYPNOSIS LABOR PREGNANCY 1962 10 13 1962 10 13 0 1 1962 10 13 0 0 ppublish 13883794 PMC1926425 Br Med J. 1952 Apr 5;1(4761):734-7 14916125

1962 British medical journal

20. The characteristics of women who use hypnotherapy for intrapartum pain management: Preliminary insights from a nationally-representative sample of Australian women. (Abstract)

hypnosis, or hypnobirthing, for pain management during labour and birth.Women using hypnobirthing were more likely to have consulted with an acupuncturist or naturopath, or attended yoga/meditation classes during pregnancy (p<0.0001). Use of CM products such as herbal medicines, aromatherapy oils, homoeopathy, herbal teas or flower essences (p<0.001) was also more common amongst these women. Women choosing hypnotherapy for intrapartum pain management less commonly identified as feeling safer knowing (...) The characteristics of women who use hypnotherapy for intrapartum pain management: Preliminary insights from a nationally-representative sample of Australian women. This manuscript presents a preliminary examination of the characteristics of women who choose intrapartum hypnosis for pain management.Cross-sectional analysis of 2445 women (31-36 years) from a sub-study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), employing Fisher exact tests.Australia.Use of intrapartum

2016 Complementary Therapies In Medicine

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