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Hypertension in Athletes

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1. Recommendations for exercise and screening for safe athletic participation in hypertensive youth. (PubMed)

Recommendations for exercise and screening for safe athletic participation in hypertensive youth. Physical activity is an important component of ideal cardiovascular health. Current guidelines recommend that youth with hypertension participate in competitive sports once hypertensive target organ effects and risks have been assessed and that children with hypertension receive treatment to lower BP below stage 2 thresholds (e.g., < 140/90 mmHg or < 95th percentile + 12 mmHg) before participating (...) review determinants of blood pressure during exercise, the impact of blood pressure on cardiovascular health and structure, mechanisms for assessing cardiometabolic fitness (e.g., exercise stress test), contraindications to athletic participation, and how best to plan for athletic participation among hypertensive youth. Greater knowledge in these areas may offer clarity to providers faced with the challenge of prescribing exercise recommendations for hypertensive youth.

2019 Pediatric Nephrology

2. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 6: Hypertension

Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 6: Hypertension Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 6: Hypertension | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search October 2019 September 2019 August 2019 July 2019 June 2019 May 2019 April 2019 March 2019 February 2019 January 2019 This site (...) uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 6: Hypertension A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology , MD, FAHA, Chair , MD , and MD, FAHA, FACC MDon behalf of the American Heart Association Electrocardiography

2015 American Heart Association

3. Recommendations for participation in competitive sports of athletes with arterial hypertension: a position statement from the sports cardiology section of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC). (PubMed)

Recommendations for participation in competitive sports of athletes with arterial hypertension: a position statement from the sports cardiology section of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC). Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology advocate regular physical activity as a Class IA recommendation for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Despite its undisputed multitude of beneficial effects, competitive athletes with arterial hypertension (...) may be exposed to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This document is an update of the 2005 recommendations and will give guidance to physicians who have to decide on the risk of an athlete during sport participation.

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2018 European Heart Journal

4. High blood pressure response to exercise predicts future development of hypertension in young athletes. (PubMed)

High blood pressure response to exercise predicts future development of hypertension in young athletes. Due to superior exercise performance, athletes show higher blood pressure (BP) at peak exercise compared to untrained individuals. Thus, higher reference values for peak exercise systolic and diastolic BP were reported specifically for athletes. However, the prognostic significance of high blood pressure response (HBPR) to exercise has not yet been clarified in this population.One hundred (...) and forty-one normotensive athletes with HBPR to exercise were compared to 141 normotensive athletes with normal blood pressure response (NBPR) to exercise, matched for gender, age, body size, and type of sport. All athletes were followed up for 6.5 ± 2.8 years. Over follow-up, no cardiac events occurred; 24 athletes were diagnosed essential hypertension (8.5%). Specifically, 19 (13.5%) belonged to the HBPR compared with 5 (3.5%) in the NBPR group (P = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed

2018 European Heart Journal

5. Prevalence and Management of Systemic Hypertension in Athletes. (PubMed)

Prevalence and Management of Systemic Hypertension in Athletes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence, determinants, and clinical management of systemic hypertension in a large cohort of competitive athletes: 2,040 consecutive athletes (aged 25 ± 6 years, 64% men) underwent clinical evaluation including blood test, electrocardiogram, exercise test, echocardiography, and ophthalmic evaluation. Sixty-five athletes (3%) were identified with hypertension (men = 57; 87 (...) %) including 5 with a secondary cause (thyroid dysfunction in 3, renal artery stenosis in 1, and drug induced in 1). The hypertensive athletes had greater left ventricular hypertrophy and showed more often a concentric pattern than normotensive ones. Moreover, they showed a mildly reduced physical performance and were characterized by a higher cardiovascular risk profile compared with normotensive athletes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that family hypertension history (odds ratio 2.05

2017 American Journal of Cardiology

6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Joint Position Statement on the Cardiovascular Screening of Competitive Athletes

Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Joint Position Statement on the Cardiovascular Screening of Competitive Athletes Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Joint Position Statement on the Cardiovascular Screening of Competitive Athletes - Canadian Journal of Cardiology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 1–11 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian (...) Heart Rhythm Society Joint Position Statement on the Cardiovascular Screening of Competitive Athletes Primary Panel (CCS Sport Group) : , x Amer M. Johri Affiliations Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada Correspondence Corresponding author: Dr Amer M. Johri, MD, MSc, FRCPC, FASE, Queen’s University, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, CINQ, 76 Stuart St, FAPC 3, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7, Canada. Tel.: +1-613-549-6666; fax: +1-613-533-6695. , MD, MSc, FRCPC, FASE (Co-chair

2018 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

7. The Impact of Previous Athletic Experience on Current Physical Fitness in Former Collegiate Athletes and Noncollegiate Athletes (PubMed)

The Impact of Previous Athletic Experience on Current Physical Fitness in Former Collegiate Athletes and Noncollegiate Athletes Physical activity performed at moderate intensity is associated with reduced risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and some types of cancers. However, vigorous physical activity during participation in college athletics may increase the risk of injury, which might limit future physical activity levels.To evaluate differences in current physical (...) fitness levels between former Division I athletes and noncollegiate athletes.Cross-sectional study.Level 3.The sample was recruited from a large midwestern university alumni database and consisted of 2 cohorts: (1) former Division I athletes (n = 100; mean age, 53.1 ± 7.4 years) and (2) nonathletes who were active in college (n = 100; age, 51.4 ± 7.3 years). Individuals answered a demographics questionnaire and completed a physical fitness assessment consisting of 7 measures: percent body fat, 1-mile

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2017 Sports health

8. Hypertension in Athletes

Hypertension in Athletes Hypertension in Athletes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hypertension in Athletes (...) Hypertension in Athletes Aka: Hypertension in Athletes , Exercise Participation in Hypertensive Patients , Blood Pressure Elevations and Physical Activity II. Activity Restrictions See No Restriction Controlled mild to moderate <140/90 Limit to low-intensity dynamic, no isometric sports (>140/90) Controlled with end organ damage Controlled No s due to renal cause References III. General recommendations Gradual cool down prevents post-exercise IV. Management: Starting Exercise (non-athletes) 30-60 minutes

2018 FP Notebook

9. ESC/ESH Management of Arterial Hypertension

ESC/ESH Management of Arterial Hypertension We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. 2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation (...) Article navigation 01 September 2018 Article Contents Article Navigation 2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension Bryan Williams ESC Chairperson Corresponding authors. Bryan Williams, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, Maple House, 1st Floor, Suite A, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7DN, UK, Tel: +44 (0) 20 3108 7907, E-mail: . Search for other works by this author on: Giuseppe Mancia ESH Chairperson Giuseppe Mancia, University of Milano

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2018 European Society of Cardiology

10. Blood pressure in athletic preparticipation evaluation and the implication for cardiac remodelling. (PubMed)

Blood pressure in athletic preparticipation evaluation and the implication for cardiac remodelling. To explore blood pressure (BP) in athletes at preparticipation evaluation (PPE) in the context of recently updated US and European hypertension guidelines, and to determine the relationship between BP and left ventricular (LV) remodelling.In this retrospective study, athletes aged 13-35 years who underwent PPE facilitated by the Stanford Sports Cardiology programme were considered. Resting BP (...) was measured in both arms; repeated once if ≥140/90 mm Hg. Athletes with abnormal ECGs or known hypertension were excluded. BP was categorised per US/European hypertension guidelines. In a separate cohort of athletes undergoing routine PPE echocardiography, we explored the relationship between BP and LV remodelling (LV mass, mass/volume ratio, sphericity index) and LV function.In cohort 1 (n=2733, 65.5% male), 34.3% of athletes exceeded US hypertension thresholds. Male sex (B=3.17, p<0.001), body mass

2019 Heart

11. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 5: Valvular Heart Disease

enlargement (LVEDD ≥65 mm or ≥35.3 mm/m 2 [men] or ≥40 mm/m 2 [women]), pulmonary hypertension, or any degree of LV systolic dysfunction at rest (LV ejection fraction <60% or LVESD >40 mm) should not participate in any competitive sports, with the possible exception of low-intensity class IA sports (Class III; Level of Evidence C) . Athletes with a history of atrial fibrillation who are receiving long-term anticoagulation should not engage in sports involving any risk of bodily contact (Class III; Level (...) Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 5: Valvular Heart Disease Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 5: Valvular Heart Disease | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019

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2015 American Heart Association

12. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Preamble, Principles, and General Considerations

Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Preamble, Principles, and General Considerations Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Preamble, Principles, and General Considerations | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 (...) February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Preamble, Principles, and General Considerations A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology , MD

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2015 American Heart Association

13. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 4: Congenital Heart Disease

these exercise recommendations or identify any episodes of SCD. ASD: Untreated Recommendations It is recommended that athletes with small defects (<6 mm), normal right-sided heart volume, and no pulmonary hypertension should be allowed to participate in all sports (Class I; Level of Evidence C) . It is recommended that athletes with a large ASD and no pulmonary hypertension should be allowed to participate in all sports (Class I; Level of Evidence C) . Athletes with an ASD and pulmonary hypertension may (...) without pulmonary hypertension, myocardial dysfunction, or arrhythmias may participate in all sports (Class I; Level of Evidence C) . After operation or intervention, patients with pulmonary hypertension, arrhythmias, or myocardial dysfunction may be considered for participation in low-intensity class IA sports (Class IIb; Level of Evidence C) . VSD: Untreated Recommendations An athlete with a small or restrictive VSD with normal heart size and no pulmonary hypertension can participate in all sports

2015 American Heart Association

14. Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 9: Arrhythmias and Conduction Defects

fibrosis, inflammation, and sympathetic discharge, can also play a role. All athletes with AF should undergo a workup that includes thyroid function tests, ECGs, echocardiograms, and queries for drug use, including performance-enhancing agents and illicit drugs. Athletes with AF should be evaluated for hypertension and coronary artery disease. Further testing is warranted in some cases, including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and stress testing. Patients with underlying cardiac disease (...) Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 9: Arrhythmias and Conduction Defects Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task Force 9: Arrhythmias and Conduction Defects | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019

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2015 American Heart Association

15. Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathy Secondary to Left Ventricular Hypertrophy due to Long-term Anabolic-androgenic Steroid Use in a Former Olympic Athlete (PubMed)

Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathy Secondary to Left Ventricular Hypertrophy due to Long-term Anabolic-androgenic Steroid Use in a Former Olympic Athlete Currently, the cardiovascular risk associated with the use of anabolic steroids is not well documented. Recent studies have shown that its use may potentiate the development of cardiac dysfunction in the short term. This case report describes an encounter that supports a causal link between anabolic-androgenic steroid use (AAS) and cardiomyopathy (...) later in life. We herein present a case study of a 73-year-old prior Olympic athlete who had misused AAS for 20 years and subsequently was found to have developed a systolic and diastolic cardiomyopathy, presumably due to long-standing left ventricular hypertrophy. A 73-year-old man presented to our medical center with symptoms of lightheadedness and palpitations. He was found to be in ventricular tachycardia and was converted to sinus rhythm with medical pharmacotherapy. Further workup with two

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2018 Cureus

16. Coronary atherosclerosis in apparently healthy master athletes discovered during pre-PARTECIPATION screening. Role of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). (PubMed)

origin or deep myocardial bridge) in 8 (4.8%), both in 7 (4.2%). A negative CCTA was observed in 83 MA (49.7%). The risk-SCORE (age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking) was a good indicator for the presence of moderate/severe CA on CCTA. However, mild/moderate CA was present in 17.8% of MA clinically stratified at a low risk-SCORE.While coronary angiography is more indicated in athletes with positive stress-test ECG and high clinical risk, the CCTA may be useful in the evaluation of MA (...) Coronary atherosclerosis in apparently healthy master athletes discovered during pre-PARTECIPATION screening. Role of coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Pre-participation screening (PPS) of athletes aged over 35 years (master athletes, MA) is a major concern in Sports Cardiology. In this population, sports-related sudden cardiac death is rare but usually due to coronary atherosclerosis (CA). Coronary CT Angiography (CCTA) has changed the approach to diagnosis/management of CA, but its role

2018 International journal of cardiology

17. Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes in the U.S.

Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes in the U.S. Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes in the U.S. | BMJ EBM Spotlight by By Dr. Geoffrey Modest A recent article looked at the demographics and epidemiology of sudden death in young athletes from the United States National Registry from 1982-2011 (see Maron BJ. Am J Med (2016) 129, 1170). Details: 2406 athlete deaths were reported to the registry, of whom (...) 842 had confirmed cardiovascular causes associated with exercise, and with autopsy examination. Results: Mean age 18, 89% male, 46% white/43% African-American or other minority. 25% of deaths were during competition, 39% during practice, 17% during recreational activity, 18% unassociated with physical activity. 66% were junior high or high school, 19% in college. 35% playing basketball, 30% football. Mortality rate in males exceeded females by 6.5-fold (1:121,691 and 1:787,392 athlete-years

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine blog

18. Ascending Aortic Dimensions in Former National Football League Athletes. (PubMed)

for age, race, body surface area, systolic blood pressure, history of hypertension, current smoking, diabetes mellitus, and lipid profile, the former NFL athletes still had significantly larger ascending aortas (P<0.0001). Former NFL athletes were twice as likely to have an aorta >40 mm after adjusting for the same parameters.Ascending aortic dimensions were significantly larger in a sample of former NFL athletes after adjusting for their size, age, race, and cardiac risk factors. Whether (...) Ascending Aortic Dimensions in Former National Football League Athletes. Ascending aortic dimensions are slightly larger in young competitive athletes compared with sedentary controls, but rarely >40 mm. Whether this finding translates to aortic enlargement in older, former athletes is unknown.This cross-sectional study involved a sample of 206 former National Football League (NFL) athletes compared with 759 male subjects from the DHS-2 (Dallas Heart Study-2; mean age of 57.1 and 53.6 years

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2017 Circulation. Cardiovascular imaging

19. Bilateral External Iliac Artery Dissection in a Middle-Aged Male Athlete (PubMed)

Bilateral External Iliac Artery Dissection in a Middle-Aged Male Athlete We present the case of a bilateral external iliac artery (EIA) dissection in a 44-year-old male athlete. The patient was referred to our department for right lower abdominal pain without claudication during single squatting. His athletic history included participation in approximately five athletic events per year. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral EIA dissection and right renal infarction (...) . Following medical treatment for his hypertension and considering his medical history, a bilateral EIA replacement with 8-mm Dacron straight grafts was performed on the 24th day after hospital admission. Postoperative contrast-enhanced CT revealed good bilateral graft patency and perfusion following surgery.

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2017 Annals of vascular diseases

20. The Effects of Dark Chocolate Implementation in Elite Athletes

The Effects of Dark Chocolate Implementation in Elite Athletes The Effects of Dark Chocolate Implementation in Elite Athletes - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The Effects of Dark Chocolate (...) Implementation in Elite Athletes The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03288623 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : September 20, 2017 Last Update Posted : September 29, 2017 See Sponsor: University of Roma La

2017 Clinical Trials

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