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Hypermobility Signs

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1. Hypermobility Signs

Hypermobility Signs Hypermobility Signs Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hypermobility Signs Hypermobility Signs Aka (...) : Hypermobility Signs , Joint Hyperextensibility , Joint Laxity , Hypermobility syndrome II. Signs: Joint hyperextension Thumb hyperextension onto Fingers hyperextend to be parallel to ( hyperextension) hyperextension (<0 degrees) hyperextension (<0 degrees) dorsiflexion >45 degrees (normally up to 20 degrees) Spine hyperextension Forward flexion with knees straight, palms on floor III. Associated Conditions Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome IV. Complications Hip dysplasia Dislocated Images: Related links to external

2018 FP Notebook

2. Joint Hypermobility - Identification and Management of

, particularly when their joints were exposed to excessive loading as in oral parafunctions (nail biting, gum chewing, teeth grinding) (Westling 1992 [4a]). Evidence-Based Care Guideline for Management of Pediatric Joint Hypermobility Guideline 43 Copyright © 2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, all rights reserved. Page 7 of 48 Note 5: Joint clicks (potential signs of TMD) were positively associated with larger active and passive opening (Winocur 2000 [4a]). Note 6: Intraoperative images of 2 (...) Joint Hypermobility - Identification and Management of Evidence-Based Care Guideline for Management of Pediatric Joint Hypermobility Guideline 43 Copyright © 2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, all rights reserved. Page 1 of 48 James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence Evidence-Based Care Guideline Identification and Management of Pediatric Joint Hypermobility In children and adolescents aged 4 to 21 years old a Publication Date: October 21, 2014 Target Population

2014 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

3. Resistance Training for Patients With Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders and Shoulder Symptoms: a Feasibility Study

Resistance Training for Patients With Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders and Shoulder Symptoms: a Feasibility Study Resistance Training for Patients With Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders and Shoulder Symptoms: a Feasibility Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Resistance Training for Patients With Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders and Shoulder Symptoms: a Feasibility Study The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03547570 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : June 6, 2018 Last

2018 Clinical Trials

4. Contemporary approach to joint hypermobility and related disorders. (PubMed)

Contemporary approach to joint hypermobility and related disorders. Joint hypermobility is a common, although largely ignored physical sign. Joint hypermobility is often asymptomatic but may be a feature of an underlying genetic disorder with systemic manifestations. The present article presents a comprehensive approach to considering joint hypermobility and clinically related issues in children and adults.Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for various Mendelian connective tissue (...) disorders sharing joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Hypermobile EDS is the default diagnosis in many individuals and still lacks of any confirmatory test. There is also a continuous spectrum of phenotypes between asymptomatic, nonsyndromic joint hypermobility, and hypermobile EDS. In 2017, a new international classification of EDSs, joint hypermobility, and related disorders was published. EDSs are now classified in 13 different variants because of mutations in 19 genes

2017 Current Opinion in Pediatrics

5. The Comorbidity of Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome and Functional Constipation in Children

The Comorbidity of Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome and Functional Constipation in Children The Comorbidity of Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome and Functional Constipation in Children - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. The Comorbidity of Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome and Functional Constipation in Children (MobCon) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02854098 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified March 2017 by Andrzej Załęski, Medical University of Warsaw

2016 Clinical Trials

6. Investigation of Hypermobility, Biomarkers, and Pain Generators in Chronic Pain Patients

Investigation of Hypermobility, Biomarkers, and Pain Generators in Chronic Pain Patients Investigation of Hypermobility, Biomarkers, and Pain Generators in Chronic Pain Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies (...) before adding more. Investigation of Hypermobility, Biomarkers, and Pain Generators in Chronic Pain Patients (Hypermoble) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02761928 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting First Posted : May 4, 2016 Last Update Posted : October 10, 2018 Sponsor

2016 Clinical Trials

7. Benign Hypermobility Syndrome

Syndrome Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Aka: Benign Hypermobility Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology : 8-20% Age: Young girls or adolescents III. Differential Diagnosis Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome IV. Symptoms ralized Hypermobility V. Signs See Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Benign Hypermobility Syndrome." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (...) Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Benign Hypermobility

2018 FP Notebook

8. Arthralgias, fatigue, paresthesias and visceral pain: can joint hypermobility solve the puzzle? A case report. (PubMed)

fatigue and troublesome visceral pain, we illustrate how a frequently ignored clinical sign such as joint hypermobility can be the keystone to clarify different simultaneous symptoms. All of the patient's physical complaints had been investigated separately during her previous medical examinations, and several tests repeatedly gave negative results. The patient received different diagnoses that describe only part of her problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome for visceral pain, fibromyalgia (...) for arthralgias or depression for fatigue. These approaches gave rise to pharmacological or physical treatments which did not improve her quality of life in any way and in some instances worsened the situation. Pronounced joint hypermobility which led the patient to flex her joints excessively, causing subluxations in several districts, was the only sign overlooked.Exploring the patient's articular features in her clinical context led us to diagnose joint hypermobility syndrome, a complex and often ignored

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2016 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

9. Hypermobility Signs

Hypermobility Signs Hypermobility Signs Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hypermobility Signs Hypermobility Signs Aka (...) : Hypermobility Signs , Joint Hyperextensibility , Joint Laxity , Hypermobility syndrome II. Signs: Joint hyperextension Thumb hyperextension onto Fingers hyperextend to be parallel to ( hyperextension) hyperextension (<0 degrees) hyperextension (<0 degrees) dorsiflexion >45 degrees (normally up to 20 degrees) Spine hyperextension Forward flexion with knees straight, palms on floor III. Associated Conditions Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome IV. Complications Hip dysplasia Dislocated Images: Related links to external

2015 FP Notebook

10. A Study to Assess Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome in Children With a History of Wheezing or Asthma

A Study to Assess Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome in Children With a History of Wheezing or Asthma A Study to Assess Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome in Children With a History of Wheezing or Asthma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. A Study to Assess Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome in Children With a History of Wheezing or Asthma The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02163096 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : June 13, 2014 Last Update Posted : January 8

2014 Clinical Trials

11. Joint hypermobility syndrome subclassification in paediatrics: a factor analytic approach. (PubMed)

Joint hypermobility syndrome subclassification in paediatrics: a factor analytic approach. To determine if exploratory factor analysis can identify subtypes comprising recognisable clinical patterns of the presenting signs and symptoms of children with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS).Eighty-nine children with JHS aged 6-16 years.Twelve tests comprising anthropometric, musculoskeletal and functional assessments were conducted. Signs, symptoms and family history were recorded. Exploratory (...) , and was associated with greater fatigue (r=-0.43, p<0.01) and reduced HRQOL (r=-0.44, p<0.0001). Factor 5, 'high BMI' JHS, had high loadings on body mass index (BMI) for age, muscle endurance and no gastrointestinal involvement, and was associated with higher pain (r=0.33, p<0.01).The presenting signs and symptoms of children with JHS can be summarised in five clinically recognisable subtypes.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

2014 Archives of Disease in Childhood

12. Benign Hypermobility Syndrome

Syndrome Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Aka: Benign Hypermobility Syndrome From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology : 8-20% Age: Young girls or adolescents III. Differential Diagnosis Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome IV. Symptoms ralized Hypermobility V. Signs See Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Benign Hypermobility Syndrome." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (...) Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Benign Hypermobility Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Benign Hypermobility

2015 FP Notebook

13. Hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by Lapidus procedure. (PubMed)

Hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated by Lapidus procedure. Foot deformities and related problems of the forefoot are very common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The laxity of the medial cuneometatarsal joint and its synovitis are important factors in the development of forefoot deformity. The impaired joint causes the first metatarsal bone to become unstable in the frontal and sagittal planes. In this retrospective study we evaluated (...) data of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent Lapidus procedure. We evaluated the role of the instability in a group of patients, focusing mainly on the clinical symptoms and X-ray signs of the instability.The study group included 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The indications of the Lapidus procedure were a hallux valgus deformity greater than 15 degrees and varus deformity of the first metatarsal bone with the intermetatarsal angle greater than 15 degrees on anterio-posterior

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2012 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

14. Skin signs in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: clinical tests and para-clinical methods. (PubMed)

Skin signs in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: clinical tests and para-clinical methods. The criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) should be reliable. Examination for general joint hypermobility has high reliability but there is only sparse information on the reliability of skin tests, and no information on the level of normal skin extensibility. The present study aimed to assess skin signs by means of clinical and para-clinical methods.A total of 31 EDS patients

2010 Scandinavian journal of rheumatology

15. Marfan syndrome

retinal abnormalities joint hypermobility aortic valve murmur mitral valve murmur hx of treatment for dental crowding hx of myopia and/or astigmatism reduced elbow extension glaucoma hx of spontaneous pneumothorax striae low back ache joint pain inguinal/abdominal/incisional hernias dyspnoea signs of heart failure FHx of Marfan syndrome FHx of aortic dissection or aneurysm high parental age Diagnostic investigations echocardiography CT scan, thorax slit-lamp eye examination with intra-ocular pressure (...) (3):581-94. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3287925?tool=bestpractice.com Skin striae, dural ectasia, hernias, pneumothorax, and emphysematous bullae on CXR may also be noted. History and exam presence of risk factors tall stature wide arm span high level of pubic bone high arched palate arachnodactyly positive wrist sign positive thumb sign pectus excavatum (funnel chest) pectus carinatum (pigeon breast) scoliosis flat feet (pes planus) dislocated/subluxed eye lens myopia and/or astigmatism

2018 BMJ Best Practice

16. Marfan syndrome

retinal abnormalities joint hypermobility aortic valve murmur mitral valve murmur hx of treatment for dental crowding hx of myopia and/or astigmatism reduced elbow extension glaucoma hx of spontaneous pneumothorax striae low back ache joint pain inguinal/abdominal/incisional hernias dyspnoea signs of heart failure FHx of Marfan syndrome FHx of aortic dissection or aneurysm high parental age Diagnostic investigations echocardiography CT scan, thorax slit-lamp eye examination with intra-ocular pressure (...) (3):581-94. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3287925?tool=bestpractice.com Skin striae, dural ectasia, hernias, pneumothorax, and emphysematous bullae on CXR may also be noted. History and exam presence of risk factors tall stature wide arm span high level of pubic bone high arched palate arachnodactyly positive wrist sign positive thumb sign pectus excavatum (funnel chest) pectus carinatum (pigeon breast) scoliosis flat feet (pes planus) dislocated/subluxed eye lens myopia and/or astigmatism

2018 BMJ Best Practice

17. Management of Stroke in Neonates and Children

health problem causing substantial morbidity and mortality, it is also an important cause of acquired brain injury in young patients, occurring most commonly in the neonate and throughout childhood. This scientific statement represents a synthesis of data and a consensus of the leading experts in childhood cardiovascular disease and stroke. Overview of Childhood and Perinatal Stroke Introduction and Definition The standard adult definition of stroke—an acute onset neurological sign or symptom (...) with AIS or CSVT, clinical trial data are lacking. Childhood Stroke Approach to a Suspected Stroke in a Child Clinical Presentation Signs and symptoms of acute stroke in children are similar to those in adults. The most common symptoms include hemiparesis and hemifacial weakness in 67% to 90%, speech or language disturbance in 20% to 50%, vision disturbance in 10% to 15%, and ataxia in 8% to 10%. Children present with nonlocalizing symptoms such as headache in 20% to 50% and altered mental status in 17

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2019 American Heart Association

18. Urinary Incontinence

. Neurourol Urodyn, 2010. 29: 428. 48. Schick, E., et al. Predictive value of maximum urethral closure pressure, urethral hypermobility and urethral incompetence in the diagnosis of clinically significant female genuine stress incontinence. J Urol, 2004. 171: 1871. 49. Dorflinger, A., et al. Urethral pressure profile: is it affected by position? Neurourol Urodyn, 2002. 21: 553. 50. Wang, A.C., et al. A comparison of urethral pressure profilometry using microtip and double-lumen perfusion catheters

2019 European Association of Urology

19. ACR–ASNR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Head and Neck

and updated periodically. The supervising physician should use pertinent clinical information and relevant ancillary imaging studies in order to select the appropriate imaging protocol for any given patient and clinical setting. The written or electronic request for MRI of the head and neck should provide sufficient information to demonstrate the medical necessity of the examination and allow for its proper performance and interpretation. Documentation that satisfies medical necessity includes 1) signs (...) , especially in cases of reduced range of motion, malocclusion, mandibular shift, and hypermobility. T1-weighted imaging is typically used, and scans are obtained as the mouth is incrementally opened using a passive positioning device [103-111]. V. DOCUMENTATION Reporting should be in accordance with the ACR Practice Parameter for Communication of Diagnostic Imaging Findings [112]. The report should address the presence or absence of a mass, the size of the lesion and its composition, and enhancement

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

20. Bruising

as bruising on exposed areas (such as the arms or legs) after minor trauma. May be associated with menorrhagia. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) A rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder which leads to mucocutaneous telangiectasia of the skin, mucous membranes, and organs. There may be a positive family history, recurrent nosebleeds, fatigue, nail changes, and hair loss. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome This causes joint hypermobility and skin translucency and hyperextensibility. It may present (...) for: Splenomegaly — suggests malignancy or (rare). Hepatomegaly — suggests malignancy or liver disease. Ascites, caput medusa, and spider telangiectasia — suggest chronic liver disease. Examine the head and neck. The oropharynx — for signs of bleeding, trauma, or healing injury to the frenulae (may suggest other non-accidental injury); gum hypertrophy may occur in monocytic leukaemia; wet purpura on the buccal mucosa or tongue is suggestive of severe thrombocytopenia. The eyes — use fundoscopy to check

2017 Prodigy

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