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Hyperabduction Syndrome

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1. Hyperabduction Syndrome

sampling from a Bing search on the term "Hyperabduction Syndrome." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Hyperabduction syndrome (C0270893) Concepts Disease or Syndrome ( T047 ) SnomedCT 17393007 English Hyperabduction syndrome , Pectoralis minor syndrome , Hyperabduction syndrome (disorder) , hyperabduction; syndrome , syndrome; hyperabduction Dutch hyperabductie; syndroom , syndroom; hyperabductie Spanish (...) Hyperabduction Syndrome Hyperabduction Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hyperabduction Syndrome Hyperabduction

2018 FP Notebook

2. Hyperabduction Syndrome

sampling from a Bing search on the term "Hyperabduction Syndrome." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Hyperabduction syndrome (C0270893) Concepts Disease or Syndrome ( T047 ) SnomedCT 17393007 English Hyperabduction syndrome , Pectoralis minor syndrome , Hyperabduction syndrome (disorder) , hyperabduction; syndrome , syndrome; hyperabduction Dutch hyperabductie; syndroom , syndroom; hyperabductie Spanish (...) Hyperabduction Syndrome Hyperabduction Syndrome Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hyperabduction Syndrome Hyperabduction

2015 FP Notebook

3. Thoracic outlet syndrome

Thoracic outlet syndrome Thoracic outlet syndrome - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Thoracic outlet syndrome Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Compression of 1 or more of the neurovascular structures traversing the superior aperture of the chest. May affect neurological or vascular structures, or both, depending on the component of the neurovascular bundle predominantly (...) compressed. Types include neurological, arterial, venous, and neurovascular/combined, and patients may present with signs and symptoms of nerve, vein, or artery compression or any combination of these. Neurological is the most common, while arterial, which is relatively rare, is arguably the most important to recognise owing to the risk of ischaemia. Neurological thoracic outlet syndrome primarily develops spontaneously in people in their late teens up to the age of 60 years, and is more common in women

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Date of origin: 2014 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Imaging in the Diagnosis of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Radiologic Procedure Rating Comments RRL* X-ray chest 8 ? MRA chest without and with IV contrast 8 O CTA chest with IV contrast 7 ??? MRI chest without IV contrast 7 O US duplex Doppler subclavian artery and vein 6 O Digital (...) . Int Orthop. 2011;35(8):1179-1186. 7. Gharagozloo F, Meyer M, Tempesta B, Strother E, Margolis M, Neville R. Proposed pathogenesis of Paget- Schroetter disease: impingement of the subclavian vein by a congenitally malformed bony tubercle on the first rib. J Clin Pathol. 2012;65(3):262-266. 8. Rayan GM, Jensen C. Thoracic outlet syndrome: provocative examination maneuvers in a typical population. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 1995;4(2):113-117. 9. Dale WA, Lewis MR. Management of thoracic outlet syndrome

2019 American College of Radiology

5. CRACKCast E087 – Peripheral Arteriovascular Disease

a vasospastic disorder with no known underlying cause. Diagnostic criteria: Precipitated episodes after cold or emotional upset Bilateral symptoms No or minimal gangrene (tissue loss) No disease condition that could cause secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon is present Symptoms have occurred for at least 2 years The classic attack is tri-phasic: Pallor (chalk white). → cyanosis → rubor/red Complete closure of the palmar/digital arteries Slight flow of blood Arterial flow returns to baseline – with hyperemia (...) outlet syndrome. Shownotes – Rosen’s In Perspective This chapter covers the diseases that affect the medium and small arteries in the body (ie. not the aorta, innominate, common carotid, subclavian, or pulmonary arteries). While not featured in the podcast, we’re going to take a deeper dive into the 3 layers of an arterial wall here in the shownotes…because this is going to be a beast of a podcast! Describe the 3 wall layers of an artery: Tunica: Intima: the inner endothelial lining that protects

2017 CandiEM

6. Nonarticular Rheumatism/Regional Pain Syndrome (Treatment)

material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Nonarticular Rheumatism/Regional Pain Syndrome) and Nonarticular Rheumatism/Regional Pain Syndrome What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Rheumatologists Recommended 2002 329838-overview Diseases & Conditions Diseases & Conditions 2002 312778-overview Diseases & Conditions Diseases & Conditions 2002 1006715-overview Diseases (...) and prepatellar bursitis. Never inject into the Achilles tendon because of the risk of rupture. Bursal aspiration and sometimes sclerosis with tetracycline Assessment of home and workplace habits such as posture and repetitive motion Alterations in sleep position may benefit persons with neurovascular entrapment such as thoracic outlet syndrome (ie, avoiding arm hyperabduction) and carpal tunnel syndromes (avoiding wrist flexion). Women with heavy pendulous breasts may need brassieres with proper support

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Imaging Find Us On About Membership WebMD Network Editions All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2019 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Imaging) and Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Imaging What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Radiologists Recommended 2001 /viewarticle (...) provides superior analysis of the vasculature in relation to the bony structures, whereas MR angiography or venography is more efficient in the depiction of accessory muscles, muscle hypertrophy, and fibrous bands [ ] . Angiography and venography remain the criterion standards for the radiologic diagnosis of these conditions, and they have the added benefit of enabling potential endovascular treatment. [ , , , , , , , ] The findings of the Allen maneuver, the hyperabduction maneuver, are considered

2014 eMedicine Radiology

8. Upper Extremity Occlusive Disease (Overview)

, , penetrating, [ ] blunt, or iatrogenic) Arteritis (eg, Takayasu arteritis or arteritis) Irradiation Embolic (eg, cardiac or thoracic outlet in origin, including bacterial endocarditis, microemboli from ascending aorta, or ) Digital artery occlusion (see the image below) Connective-tissue disease - ; (chondrocalcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal motility disorder, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome; and mixed connective-tissue disease Buerger disease Hypersensitivity angitis Hematologic (...) of microcirculatory disorders of the upper extremities with 2D fluorescence optical imaging. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc . 2018. 70 (1):69-81. . Mahe G, Liedl DA, McCarter C, Shepherd R, Gloviczki P, McPhail IR, et al. Digital obstructive arterial disease can be detected by laser Doppler measurements with high sensitivity and specificity. J Vasc Surg . 2014 Apr. 59 (4):1051-1057.e1. . Vauclair F, Haller C, Marques-Vidal P, Déglise S, Haesler E, Corpataux JM, et al. Infrainguinal bypass for peripheral arterial

2014 eMedicine Surgery

9. Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity (Treatment)

condition without underlying cause, sometimes leading to acral necrosis. It is defined in Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary as "a primary or idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral attacks of Raynaud phenomenon." Raynaud disease usually occurs in persons aged 30-50 years. Prevalence is greater in females than in males, and symptoms last more than 2 years. Patients demonstrate bilateral hand involvement, with pallor of digits secondary to cold exposure or psychologic stressors (...) Editions All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2019 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity) and Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Orthopedists Recommended 2002 460178-overview Procedures

2014 eMedicine Surgery

10. Upper Extremity Occlusive Disease (Treatment)

with vasospastic disease of the hand. If this is not tolerated, at a low dosage may be tried. A third-line drug with some effectiveness is . Lifestyle changes are essential. Warm gloves must be worn, and the skin must be protected from drying and fissuring. Cold avoidance may require moving to a warm climate and avoidance of significantly chilled or air-conditioned environments. Avoidance of vibration trauma from work or hobbies may be necessary. In patients with or , is the first-line agent. Immunosuppression (...) . 2018 Jul 28. . Sumpio BJ, Citoni G, Chin JA, Sumpio BE. Use of hyperspectral imaging to assess endothelial dysfunction in peripheral arterial disease. J Vasc Surg . 2016 Oct. 64 (4):1066-73. . Neumann J, Schmaderer C, Finsterer S, Zimmermann A, Steubl D, Helfen A, et al. Noninvasive quantitative assessment of microcirculatory disorders of the upper extremities with 2D fluorescence optical imaging. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc . 2018. 70 (1):69-81. . Mahe G, Liedl DA, McCarter C, Shepherd R, Gloviczki P

2014 eMedicine Surgery

11. Upper Extremity Occlusive Disease (Diagnosis)

, , penetrating, [ ] blunt, or iatrogenic) Arteritis (eg, Takayasu arteritis or arteritis) Irradiation Embolic (eg, cardiac or thoracic outlet in origin, including bacterial endocarditis, microemboli from ascending aorta, or ) Digital artery occlusion (see the image below) Connective-tissue disease - ; (chondrocalcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal motility disorder, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome; and mixed connective-tissue disease Buerger disease Hypersensitivity angitis Hematologic (...) of microcirculatory disorders of the upper extremities with 2D fluorescence optical imaging. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc . 2018. 70 (1):69-81. . Mahe G, Liedl DA, McCarter C, Shepherd R, Gloviczki P, McPhail IR, et al. Digital obstructive arterial disease can be detected by laser Doppler measurements with high sensitivity and specificity. J Vasc Surg . 2014 Apr. 59 (4):1051-1057.e1. . Vauclair F, Haller C, Marques-Vidal P, Déglise S, Haesler E, Corpataux JM, et al. Infrainguinal bypass for peripheral arterial

2014 eMedicine Surgery

12. Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity (Follow-up)

condition without underlying cause, sometimes leading to acral necrosis. It is defined in Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary as "a primary or idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral attacks of Raynaud phenomenon." Raynaud disease usually occurs in persons aged 30-50 years. Prevalence is greater in females than in males, and symptoms last more than 2 years. Patients demonstrate bilateral hand involvement, with pallor of digits secondary to cold exposure or psychologic stressors (...) Editions All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2019 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity) and Vascular Occlusive Syndromes of the Upper Extremity What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Orthopedists Recommended 2002 460178-overview Procedures

2014 eMedicine Surgery

13. Upper Extremity Occlusive Disease (Follow-up)

with vasospastic disease of the hand. If this is not tolerated, at a low dosage may be tried. A third-line drug with some effectiveness is . Lifestyle changes are essential. Warm gloves must be worn, and the skin must be protected from drying and fissuring. Cold avoidance may require moving to a warm climate and avoidance of significantly chilled or air-conditioned environments. Avoidance of vibration trauma from work or hobbies may be necessary. In patients with or , is the first-line agent. Immunosuppression (...) . 2018 Jul 28. . Sumpio BJ, Citoni G, Chin JA, Sumpio BE. Use of hyperspectral imaging to assess endothelial dysfunction in peripheral arterial disease. J Vasc Surg . 2016 Oct. 64 (4):1066-73. . Neumann J, Schmaderer C, Finsterer S, Zimmermann A, Steubl D, Helfen A, et al. Noninvasive quantitative assessment of microcirculatory disorders of the upper extremities with 2D fluorescence optical imaging. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc . 2018. 70 (1):69-81. . Mahe G, Liedl DA, McCarter C, Shepherd R, Gloviczki P

2014 eMedicine Surgery

14. Is rib resection necessary for relief of thoracic outlet syndrome? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Is rib resection necessary for relief of thoracic outlet syndrome? Between 1966 and 1975, 425 patients with thoracic outlet symptoms were studied: 146 operative procedures were carried out in 103 of these patients. Division of soft tissues, only, in 129 cases offered relief of symptoms. In 10 cases bone resections (four cervical ribs, one second rib, one clavicle, and four first ribs) were done in an attempt to relieve the outlet problems. Preoperative evaluation included neurological (...) consultation, x-rays of the neck and chest, detailed non-invasive oscillographic recordings of arterial flow during various outlet maneuvers, angiograms and in many instances electromyograms and nerve conduction studies. The axillary surgical approach to be various compression areas was preferred in that hyperabduction of the arm and costoclavicular maneuvers could be carried out under direct observation of the involved vessels. Accurate appraisal of the compression point could be assessed before and after

1977 Annals of Surgery

15. Bilateral upper extremity deep vein thromboses: not an effortless diagnosis

, a venous thoracic outlet syndrome (venous TOS or VTOS) [4]. The resulting thrombosis was first described by Paget [5] and then by Schrötter [6], [7]. And finally, given this pathology was often observed in otherwise healthy adults with a history of extensive use of their upper extremities, the term effort thrombosis is also used [4]. Despite all the different terms used to describe this condition, the pathophysiology is one and the same: anatomic compression of the subclavian vein at the thoracic (...) primary UEDVTs and how they can present without any of the classic thoracic outlet syndrome findings Case A healthy 53-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of left-sided neck and arm pain, and left arm swelling. On exam, pulses, strength, and sensation were unremarkable and symmetrical bilaterally. All laboratory studies were within normal limits. Ultrasonography with doppler showed several clots in the left subclavian, axillary, and brachial veins along with the right basilic and subclavian

2019 Clinical Correlations

16. The Effectiveness of Diagnosis and Treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

the validity of teaching special tests in osteopathic medical schools and allow for a non-invasive treatment protocol for patients with TOS. Condition or disease Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Observational Actual Enrollment : 31 participants Observational Model: Case Control Time Perspective: Retrospective Official Title: The Effectiveness of Diagnosis and Treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Study Start Date : June 2011 Actual Primary (...) ): Yasmin Qureshi, MHS, MSPT, Nova Southeastern University Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is a condition causing numbness, tingling and weakness in patient's upper limbs. Symptoms are due to compression and restriction of the nerves and blood vessels (neurovascular bundle) that extend from the neck into the upper limb exerted by a patient's various anatomical structures. Neurovascular bundle compression can result in decreased nerve conduction

2011 Clinical Trials

17. Improved functional outcome in NTOS patients following resection of the subclavius muscle with radiological signs of nerve impingement: indication of participation of the subclavius in brachial plexus compression. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Improved functional outcome in NTOS patients following resection of the subclavius muscle with radiological signs of nerve impingement: indication of participation of the subclavius in brachial plexus compression. OBJECTIVEBoth clinical and radiological reports have suggested that the subclavius, a muscle in the costoclavicular space of the thoracic outlet, participates in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) in some instances, especially during movements narrowing the costoclavicular (...) postoperative DASH scores and self-assessments but better subscale scores (9.50 ± 2.76 vs 11.94 ± 2.87, p = 0.0005). Postoperative MRI on hyperabduction showed that the brachial plexus became surrounded by normal fat tissue in the costoclavicular space in the diving group but still had signs of impingement from the untreated subclavius muscle in the sparing group. This observation agreed with a better functional recovery in terms of overhead activities in the dividing group, which was reflected by better

2018 Journal of Neurosurgery

18. Does Shoulder Stabilizations Stabilize Shoulders?

motion capture and computed tomography. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Shoulder Dislocation Shoulder Pain Joint Instability Syndrome Procedure: Shoulder Stabilization Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 11 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Diagnostic Official Title: Does Shoulder Stabilizations Stabilize Shoulders (...) surgery Contraindications for computed tomography Non-traumatic onset Hyperlaxity. The latter was defined as more than 85° of external rotation at the elbow against the waist{Coudane, 2000 #3124} or hyperabduction by more than 105°.{Gagey, 2001 #1915} Contacts and Locations Go to No Contacts or Locations Provided More Information Go to Publications: Layout table for additonal information Responsible Party: Adrien Schwitzguebel, MD, La Tour Hospital ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: Other Study ID Numbers

2016 Clinical Trials

19. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Diagnosis)

of the joint. The joint disease may occur as a result of either (1) cartilage or meniscal damage with or without concomitant alterations in the structure of the subchondral bone or (2) alterations in joint anatomy caused by congenital, developmental, metabolic, or past inflammatory diseases. Arthralgia is characterized by joint tenderness, but abnormalities of the joint cannot be identified. Such patients may have a syndrome of altered pain sensation (eg, fibromyalgia) or an early rheumatic syndrome whose (...) clinical signs are not yet apparent or are too subtle for detection (eg, arthralgia of systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]). These types of joint disorders may occur together in the same joint. Inflammatory joint disorders often lead to structural derangement of the joint; similarly, structural joint problems (eg, traumatic arthritis or osteoarthritis) often have an associated, albeit minor, inflammatory component. Finally, reports of joint pain and tenderness in any type of joint disease are influenced

2014 eMedicine.com

20. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Treatment)

of the joint. The joint disease may occur as a result of either (1) cartilage or meniscal damage with or without concomitant alterations in the structure of the subchondral bone or (2) alterations in joint anatomy caused by congenital, developmental, metabolic, or past inflammatory diseases. Arthralgia is characterized by joint tenderness, but abnormalities of the joint cannot be identified. Such patients may have a syndrome of altered pain sensation (eg, fibromyalgia) or an early rheumatic syndrome whose (...) clinical signs are not yet apparent or are too subtle for detection (eg, arthralgia of systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE]). These types of joint disorders may occur together in the same joint. Inflammatory joint disorders often lead to structural derangement of the joint; similarly, structural joint problems (eg, traumatic arthritis or osteoarthritis) often have an associated, albeit minor, inflammatory component. Finally, reports of joint pain and tenderness in any type of joint disease are influenced

2014 eMedicine.com

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