How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,118 results for

Hoarseness Causes

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Assessment of hoarseness and dysphonia

or children, and may be an indication of a serious underlying pathology. Evaluation should take place whenever a serious underlying cause is suspected, irrespective of timeframe. Schwartz SR, Cohen SM, Dailey SH, et al. Clinical practice guideline: hoarseness (dysphonia). Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;141(3 suppl 2):S1-S31. http://oto.sagepub.com/content/141/3_suppl/S1.full.pdf+html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19729111?tool=bestpractice.com A wide variety of laryngeal and extra-laryngeal (...) conditions can cause hoarseness, and there are many challenges associated with its evaluation. Early identification of symptoms, by both the patient and physician, and visualisation of the larynx are mandatory for diagnosis. However, confusion surrounding the terminology of the various laryngeal lesions and inadequate laryngeal visualisation contribute to the difficulty in diagnosing hoarseness. Diagnosis and treatment are frequently delayed as a result of misdiagnosis or poor awareness of early voice

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Hoarseness (Dysphonia)

(dysphonia) is based strictly on clinical criteria and does not require testing. Hoarseness is the patient- and/or proxy-reported symptom of altered voice quality. Dysphonia is diagnosed by the clinician for individuals who present with complaints of abnormal voice or voice changes or if a proxy/parent has recognized abnormal voice or voice changes. The clinician should assess the quality of the voice. For example, a breathy voice may signify vocal fold paralysis or another cause of incomplete vocal fold (...) Hoarseness (Dysphonia) Clinical Practice Guideline: Hoarseness (Dysphonia) (Update) - Robert J. Stachler, David O. Francis, Seth R. Schwartz, Cecelia C. Damask, German P. Digoy, Helene J. Krouse, Scott J. McCoy, Daniel R. Ouellette, Rita R. Patel, Charles (Charlie) W. Reavis, Libby J. Smith, Marshall Smith, Steven W. Strode, Peak Woo, Lorraine C. Nnacheta, 2018 MENU IN THIS JOURNAL Sign In Institution Society Access Options You can be signed in via any or all of the methods shown below

2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

3. Cardiovocal Syndrome: A rare cause of hoarseness in a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (PubMed)

Cardiovocal Syndrome: A rare cause of hoarseness in a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis Hoarseness is a common clinical condition with underlying causes which can vary from reversible and benign to life-threatening and malignant. Cardiovocal syndrome may cause hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy when the recurrent laryngeal nerve is mechanically affected due to enlarged cardiovascular structures. We report a 28-year-old male who presented (...) to the Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, India, in 2013 with hoarseness. He had undergone irregular treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) two years previously. Fiber-optic laryngoscopy indicated left vocal cord palsy and a computed tomography scan of the chest revealed features of pulmonary hypertension with extensive enlargement of the pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram confirmed severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with severe tricuspid regurgitation. He was diagnosed with left

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Sultan Qaboos University medical journal

4. Unusual cause of hoarseness: Arytenoid cartilage dislocation without a traumatic event. (PubMed)

Unusual cause of hoarseness: Arytenoid cartilage dislocation without a traumatic event. Arytenoid cartilage dislocation is a rare but curable cause of hoarseness and is commonly related to intubation or laryngeal trauma. We present a case of arytenoid cartilage dislocation without a traumatic event in a man who complained of acute hoarseness. An 82-year-old man visited our emergency department complaining of acute hoarseness. He had no history of general anesthesia or laryngeal trauma and had (...) not caught a cold. He showed no abnormal physical findings including the pharynx. Examination using a laryngoscope revealed that the left vocal fold was fixed in the paramedian position. We performed contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), but we could not find any cause of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. His hoarseness persisted for one month and the initial CT was therefore reassessed. It was found that the left arytenoid cartilage was dislocated forward, and we therefore made

2017 American Journal of Emergency Medicine

5. Primary Laryngo-tracheobronchial Amyloidosis: An Unusual Cause of Hoarseness and Dyspnea (PubMed)

Primary Laryngo-tracheobronchial Amyloidosis: An Unusual Cause of Hoarseness and Dyspnea 27647204 2017 03 13 2019 02 21 2542-5641 129 19 2016 10 05 Chinese medical journal Chin. Med. J. Primary Laryngo-tracheobronchial Amyloidosis: An Unusual Cause of Hoarseness and Dyspnea. 2392-3 10.4103/0366-6999.190683 Zhang Qun-Cheng QC Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003, China. Zhang Xiao-Ju XJ Department of Respiratory (...) and Critical Care Medicine, People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003, China. An Yun-Xia YX Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003, China. Xie Hong-Jian HJ Department of Pathology, People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003, China. eng Case Reports Letter China Chin Med J (Engl) 7513795 0366-6999 IM Aged Amyloidosis diagnosis surgery Dyspnea diagnosis surgery Hoarseness

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Chinese medical journal

6. Ortner’s Syndrome-A Rare Cause of Hoarseness: Its Importance to an Otorhinolaryngologist (PubMed)

Ortner’s Syndrome-A Rare Cause of Hoarseness: Its Importance to an Otorhinolaryngologist Cardiovocal hoarseness (Ortner's syndrome) is hoarseness of voice due to recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement secondary to cardiovascular disease. Recurrent laryngeal nerve in its course (especially the left side) follows a path that brings it in close proximity to numerous structures. These structures interfere with its function by pressure or by disruption of the nerve caused by disease invading (...) the nerve. However painless asymptomatic intramural hematoma of the aortic arch, causing hoarseness as the only symptom, is a rare presentation as in this case.We report a case of silent aortic intramural hematoma which manifested as hoarseness as the only presenting symptom. A detailed history and thorough clinical examination could not reveal the pathology of hoarseness. The cause of hoarseness was diagnosed as aortic intramural hematoma on contrast computed tomography. Thus the patient was diagnosed

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Iranian journal of otorhinolaryngology

7. Hoarseness Causes

Hoarseness Causes Hoarseness Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hoarseness Causes Hoarseness Causes Aka (...) : Hoarseness Causes , Laryngitis Causes II. Causes: Primary Intralaryngeal (e.g. ) Fungal See (most common cause) Irritants ( ) smoke exposure (or other environmental irritants) Irritative with edema of Laryngeal growths (esp. or premalignant dysplasia) (or laryngeal papillomatosis) or s Reinke (polypoid chorditis, cysts or pseudocysts) tic granuloma from intubation III. Causes: Secondary Intralaryngeal Intrinsic Laryngeal Bulbar palsy (severe also present) Age-related voice atrophy Cricoarytenoid joint

2018 FP Notebook

8. Medication Causes of Hoarseness

Medication Causes of Hoarseness Medication Causes of Hoarseness Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Causes (...) of Hoarseness Medication Causes of Hoarseness Aka: Medication Causes of Hoarseness , Drug-Induced Laryngitis From Related Chapters II. Causes: Medications -Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or s (cough) s, s, s (mucosal drying) s ( ) ( ) Sex hormones such as , Testosterone s ( due to irritation, fungal infection) s such as , s such as (vocal fold hematoma) III. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Medication Causes

2018 FP Notebook

9. Laryngeal cryptococcus: a rare cause of hoarseness in renal allograft recipient (PubMed)

Laryngeal cryptococcus: a rare cause of hoarseness in renal allograft recipient Cryptococcosis commonly involves central nervous system and lungs in organ transplant recipients. Isolated laryngeal infection is extremely rare. We report a rare case of cryptococcus in a renal allograft recipient that clinically presented with hoarseness of voice and mimicked laryngeal carcinoma on examination.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Journal of nephropharmacology

10. Correspondence (letter to the editor): Hoarseness Caused by Glucocorticoids (PubMed)

Correspondence (letter to the editor): Hoarseness Caused by Glucocorticoids 26900157 2016 08 24 2018 12 02 1866-0452 113 5 2016 Feb 05 Deutsches Arzteblatt international Dtsch Arztebl Int Hoarseness Caused by Glucocorticoids. 70 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0070a arztebl.2016.0070a Schoen Hanns Detlev HD eng Letter Comment Germany Dtsch Arztebl Int 101475967 1866-0452 0 Glucocorticoids IM Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2016 Feb 5;113(5):70-1 26900159 Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2015 May 8;112(19):329-37 26043420 (...) Glucocorticoids Hoarseness Humans Postoperative Complications 2016 2 23 6 0 2016 2 24 6 0 2016 8 25 6 0 ppublish 26900157 arztebl.2016.0070a 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0070a PMC4782270 Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2015 May 8;112(19):329-37 26043420

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Deutsches Ärzteblatt international

11. Medication Causes of Hoarseness

Medication Causes of Hoarseness Medication Causes of Hoarseness Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Causes (...) of Hoarseness Medication Causes of Hoarseness Aka: Medication Causes of Hoarseness , Drug-Induced Laryngitis From Related Chapters II. Causes: Medications -Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or s (cough) s, s, s (mucosal drying) s ( ) ( ) Sex hormones such as , Testosterone s ( due to irritation, fungal infection) s such as , s such as (vocal fold hematoma) III. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Medication Causes

2017 FP Notebook

12. Xanthoma Disseminatum Presenting with Hoarseness (PubMed)

at the end of two months.Xanthoma disseminatum is a very rare form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis that classically presents with cutaneous xanthomas, mucosal xanthomas, and diabetes insipidus. Hoarseness of voice due to lesions involving the larynx is a rare symptom. Because the disease has punctated, numerous relapses and causes morbidity to the patient, its multisystem manifestations have to be known. Therefore, xanthoma disseminatum has to be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis (...) Xanthoma Disseminatum Presenting with Hoarseness Xanthoma disseminatum (XD) is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans cell histiocytic disorder with unknown etio-pathology. It manifests with multiple, grouped, red-brown to yellow papules and nodules involving the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs with a predilection for flexures and the face.We report a patient who presented with disseminated xanthomatous papules and nodules involving the face, neck, trunk, axilla, groin, and oral cavity

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Iranian journal of otorhinolaryngology

13. A Study of Clinicopathological Profile of Patients of Hoarseness of Voice Presenting to Tertiary Care hospital (PubMed)

A Study of Clinicopathological Profile of Patients of Hoarseness of Voice Presenting to Tertiary Care hospital Hoarseness is subjective term used to describe abnormal voice quality which may occur due to many causes because it is just a symptom. Proper knowledge and clinicopathological profile is important to treat the underlying pathology. This prospective study was carried out in 100 patients presented in Department of ENT, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal from April 2013 to September 2014 (...) and if required CT SCAN larynx is done. Out of 100 patients maximum were from 50 to 70 years age group. 89% were males while only 11% were females. Labourers (37%) and farmers (32%) were the major groups affected. Smoking habit found in 60% of patients and tobacco chewing in 33% of patients and both, also having. Most common cause for hoarseness was found out to be laryngeal neoplasms of which supraglottic growth being commonest (37%) in our study. Hoarseness of voice may be present due to various underlying

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery

14. Prolonged Hoarseness Caused by Arytenoid Dislocation after Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion. (PubMed)

Prolonged Hoarseness Caused by Arytenoid Dislocation after Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion. A case of arytenoid dislocation after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) is reported.To emphasize that arytenoid dislocation could be a possible cause of prolonged hoarseness in patients after ACCF.Prolonged hoarseness is a common postoperative complication of cervical surgeries, especially in the anterior approach. Postoperative hoarseness is usually associated with paresis (...) of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). However, other causes such as arytenoids dislocation, which is often misdiagnosed as RLN palsy, should not be ignored either.We reported one case of arytenoid dislocation after ACCF and reviewed the related literatures.One patient treated with ACCF experienced prolonged postoperative hoarseness. Arytenoid dislocation was confirmed by laryngoscopy examination and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan. To deal with the problem, a closed reduction

2015 Spine

15. Tracheal diverticulum: a rare cause of hoarseness of the voice. (PubMed)

Tracheal diverticulum: a rare cause of hoarseness of the voice. Tracheal diverticulum is a rare benign disease also known as paratracheal air cyst. Mostly these are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiologic examination of the chest. Common symptoms are cough, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and sometimes dysphagia. Herein we report a rare case of hoarseness of voice caused by tracheal diverticulum. Computed tomography scan of neck revealed a large tracheal diverticulum

2014 Annals of Thoracic Surgery

16. Asymptomatic aortic aneurysm causing right vocal cord palsy and hoarseness: A rare presentation (PubMed)

Asymptomatic aortic aneurysm causing right vocal cord palsy and hoarseness: A rare presentation Vocal cord palsy (VCP) presenting as hoarseness of voice can be the first symptom of very serious and sinister common pathologies. But vocal cord palsy resulting from aortic aneurysm is a rare entity and still rarer is the right cord palsy due to aortic aneurysm. We are reporting a rare case in which a 52-year old male smoking for last 30 years having asymptomatic aortic aneurysm presented to us (...) with hoarseness of voice. On Panendoscopy, no local pathology was found and CECT from base of skull to T12 was advised. CECT showed a large aneurysm involving ascending aorta and extending upto abdominal aorta with compression of the bilateral bronchi. CTVS consultation was sought and they advised for regular follow-up only. We are reporting this case to warn both the anaesthetist and the surgeon about the catastrophic complications if they are not alert in handling such cases.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Anesthesia, essays and researches

17. Positional hoarseness: an unusual symptom in jugular foramen mass (PubMed)

Positional hoarseness: an unusual symptom in jugular foramen mass We came across a case of jugular foramen mass causing positional hoarseness on turning the head left and disappearing on returning the head to a straight position. Hoarseness of voice due to vagus nerve involvement is seen in jugular foramen mass but positional hoarseness has never been seen before. We report this rarest presentation and discuss the pathophysiology behind it. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 BMJ case reports

18. Hoarseness History

: Hoarseness History , Laryngitis History II. History: Exposure Surgical history Intubation risks direct laryngeal Head, neck or chest surgery risks or recurrent laryngeal nerve Vocalist or singer Public speaking, teaching or telemarketing Umpire or coach abuse Differential Diagnosis: , , Reinke edema or Differential Diagnosis: Risk of or III. History: Onset Acute (without or ) or Chronic Smoke exposure ( ) IV. History: Timing Evening Onset: Neuromuscular cause Recurrent Morning Onset ( ) Constant (...) Hoarseness History Hoarseness History Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Hoarseness History Hoarseness History Aka

2018 FP Notebook

19. Hoarseness

. Epidemiology Hoarseness is common, with a point as high as 7% for those <65 years old III. Pathophysiology Abnormal voice production (change in pitch, loudness or effort) Breathiness Harsh, rough or raspy voice Lack of smooth vocal cord approximation Laryngeal pathology Abnormal vocal cord mobility Usually caused by organic disorder (not functional) IV. Causes See V. Symptoms Abnormal voice quality (e.g. Breathy, Strained, Raspy, Weak) VI. History See VII. Evaluation: Laryngoscopy Indications (see (...) Laryngeal Examination) More than 4 weeks of Hoarseness despite specific management trials (see below) More than 2 weeks of symptoms and risk factors for abuse disease (esp. if longstanding or with ) VIII. Management: Suspect benign causes (esp. in first 2 weeks of symptoms) See See Consider if Hoarseness persists despite empiric management ral measures: Vocal Hygiene Voice rest (do not whisper!) Avoid , and other irritants Consider humidifier Avoid raising voice volume , allergy, or Voice rest

2018 FP Notebook

20. Hoarseness due to lymph node metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report (PubMed)

resection. A computed tomography scan revealed enlarged lymph nodes under the arch of the aorta that appeared to have invaded the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, causing the hoarseness. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy of the enlarged, right supraclavicular lymph node identified malignant cells consistent with HCC. Radiation administered as a therapy to treat for the metastatic lymph nodes did not diminish the tumor but relieved the symptoms. (...) Hoarseness due to lymph node metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastases in the mediastinum are rare, particularly under the arch of the aorta. The present study describes the case of a 30-year-old male patient who presented with back pain and hoarseness for 2 months due to lymph node metastasis of HCC. The patient had undergone right hepatic lobectomy for HCC 2 years prior and received transarterial chemoembolization 4 times following

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Oncology letters

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>