How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

467 results for

High Altitude Edema

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

61. The Incidence of Subclinical High-altitude Pulmonary Oedema at High Altitude

Sickness Subclinical High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Detailed Description: The high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is the leading cause of death from high altitude sickness. At moderate altitude (2500-4500m) the incidence (0.2-6%) may be underestimated because only clinical HAPE leads to symptoms and motivates the patient to seek medical advice. Cremona et al. [Cremona et al. Pulmonary extravascular fluid accumulation in recreational climbers: a prospective study. Lancet 2002;359:303-09] suggested (...) twodimensional technology and has been applied in extreme, out-of-hospital setting, showing in recreational climbers a high prevalence of clinically silent interstitial pulmonary edema at high-altitude [Pratali L et al. Frequent subclinical high-altitude pulmonary edema detected by chest sonography as ultrasound lung comets in recreational climbers. Crit Care Med 2010;38:1818-23]. However, data for moderate altitude remain scarce, despite that mountaineers are increasing in age and comorbidities and could

2013 Clinical Trials

62. Dexamethasone improves maximal exercise capacity of individuals susceptible to high altitude pulmonary edema at 4559 m. (PubMed)

Dexamethasone improves maximal exercise capacity of individuals susceptible to high altitude pulmonary edema at 4559 m. We have previously demonstrated that prophylactic intake of dexamethasone improves maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible subjects 4 to 6 h after a 2-day climb to 4559 m. However, since with this ascent protocol HAPE usually develops after the first night at 4559 m or later, we hypothesized that a continued dexamethasone (...) prophylaxis would result in an even more pronounced improvement of Vo(2)max after an additional night at high altitude. Vo(2)max of 24 HAPE susceptibles was evaluated on a bicycle ergometer at an altitude of 490 m and at 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m. Subjects were divided into two groups: The control group (n=14) performed both tests without dexamethasone, whereas the dexamethasone group (n=10) received dexamethasone 8 mg twice a day (b.i.d), starting 24 h prior to ascent. At 4559 m, Vo(2)max was 61

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2011 High altitude medicine & biology

63. Effects of Melatonin on Sleep, Ventilatory Control and Cognition at Altitude.

), diabetes medications and birth control pills. A psychiatric disorder, other than mild depression; e.g. schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, panic or anxiety disorders. Substantial alcohol (>3oz/day) or use of illicit drugs. Previous occurrence of high altitude pulmonary or cerebral edema. Recent exposure to altitude (>8000ft) in the last month or having slept at an altitude >6000ft in the last month. Inability to provide written informed consent or able to complete the experiment. Non (...) mounting evidence that even in populations of people that live at high altitudes and are considered adapted, low oxygen contributes to reductions in learning and memory. Therefore there is a serious need for treatments which may improve sleep, control of breathing and mental function during low oxygen. Melatonin is a hormone produced in the brain during the night which regulates sleep patterns with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A study previously reported that melatonin taken 90

2017 Clinical Trials

64. Decompression Tables for Diving at Altitude

by breathing 100% O2 for 120 minutes at 1.3 ATA. This will simulate, for example, a 2 hour dive at 12,000 ft to 65 fsw breathing 50% O2. The diver will then return to 15,000 ft and remain at that altitude for 24 hours to allow for AMS symptoms to recur (if indeed they do). Lake Louise AMS scores will be collected every 8 hours. AMS symptoms will be treated with acetaminophen, NSAIDs and anti-emetics as needed. Subjects will be assessed clinically every 12 hours for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE (...) ) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Occurrence of either HAPE or HACE will require that the subject be returned immediately to 1 ATA and treated appropriately. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 72 participants Intervention Model: Sequential Assignment Intervention Model Description: This design is a two factor, incomplete block design - three altitudes (8,000, 10,000, and 12,000 feet) and 2 breathing gases (air

2017 Clinical Trials

65. The Influence of CO2 and Exercise on Hypobaric Hypoxia Induced Pulmonary Edema in Rats (PubMed)

The Influence of CO2 and Exercise on Hypobaric Hypoxia Induced Pulmonary Edema in Rats Introduction: Individuals with a known susceptibility to high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) demonstrate a reduced ventilation response and increased pulmonary vasoconstriction when exposed to hypoxia. It is unknown whether reduced sensitivity to hypercapnia is correlated with increased incidence and/or severity of HAPE, and while acute exercise at altitude is known to exacerbate symptoms the effect (...) training nor chronic intermittent hypercapnia affect HH- induced pulmonary edema.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Frontiers in physiology

66. High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i (PubMed)

High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i High Altitude Headache (HAH), Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) are all high altitude related illnesses in order of severity from the mildly symptomatic to the potentially life-threatening. High altitude illnesses occur when travelers ascend to high altitudes too rapidly, which does not allow enough time for the body to adjust. Slow graded ascent to the desired altitude and termination of ascent if AMS symptoms present (...) are keys to illness prevention. Early recognition and rapid intervention of AMS can halt progression to HACE. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with acetazolamide is a proven method of prevention and treatment of high altitude illness. If prevention fails then treatment modalities include supplemental oxygen, supportive therapy, hyperbaric treatment, and dexamethasone. Given the multitude of visitors to the mountains of Hawai'i, high altitude illness will continue to persist as a prevalent local condition

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health

67. Pulmonary Hypertension, High Altitude (Follow-up)

enzyme (ACE) gene. Genetic susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) has been attributed to variants of the endothelial nitric oxide synthetase gene ( NOS3 ). Individuals with a genetic risk for increased thrombosis may be at increased risk for HAPE. Chronic hypoxia, pulmonary venous hypertension, and increased pulmonary blood flow can markedly increase pulmonary pressures in many genetically susceptible individuals; these factors may be additive. At sea level, 25%-30% of adults (...) evidence to determine the effects of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions in treating high-altitude illness and indicated high-quality research is needed. [ ] The investigators noted low-quality evidence for dexamethasone and acetazolamide suggested these agents may reduce acute mountain sickness score relative to placebo, but their clinical benefits and harms remain unclear. High-altitude pulmonary edema High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

68. Pulmonary Hypertension, High Altitude (Overview)

enzyme (ACE) gene. Genetic susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) has been attributed to variants of the endothelial nitric oxide synthetase gene ( NOS3 ). Individuals with a genetic risk for increased thrombosis may be at increased risk for HAPE. Chronic hypoxia, pulmonary venous hypertension, and increased pulmonary blood flow can markedly increase pulmonary pressures in many genetically susceptible individuals; these factors may be additive. At sea level, 25%-30% of adults (...) evidence to determine the effects of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions in treating high-altitude illness and indicated high-quality research is needed. [ ] The investigators noted low-quality evidence for dexamethasone and acetazolamide suggested these agents may reduce acute mountain sickness score relative to placebo, but their clinical benefits and harms remain unclear. High-altitude pulmonary edema High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

69. High-Altitude Cardiopulmonary Diseases (Diagnosis)

), a spectrum that, in its severest form, can manifest as high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high-altitude cerebral edema. Fortunately, for most individuals, the symptoms are annoying but not incapacitating. The duration of these symptoms is brief, usually only several days. The development of AMS is directly related to the speed and height of the ascent and inversely related to age, as AMS is most common in the young. Symptoms observed in preverbal children include increased fussiness, decreased (...) appetite, poor sleep patterns, and decreased playfulness. High-altitude pulmonary edema Healthy children and active young adults exposed to moderate altitudes are at risk for HAPE. This is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that develops after an ascent to altitudes generally above 8000 ft (2438 m). The ascent is often rapid and is accomplished by means of either automobile or aircraft. In this situation, exposure to high altitude typically lasts several hours, most commonly after

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

70. High-Altitude Cardiopulmonary Diseases (Follow-up)

), a spectrum that, in its severest form, can manifest as high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high-altitude cerebral edema. Fortunately, for most individuals, the symptoms are annoying but not incapacitating. The duration of these symptoms is brief, usually only several days. The development of AMS is directly related to the speed and height of the ascent and inversely related to age, as AMS is most common in the young. Symptoms observed in preverbal children include increased fussiness, decreased (...) appetite, poor sleep patterns, and decreased playfulness. High-altitude pulmonary edema Healthy children and active young adults exposed to moderate altitudes are at risk for HAPE. This is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that develops after an ascent to altitudes generally above 8000 ft (2438 m). The ascent is often rapid and is accomplished by means of either automobile or aircraft. In this situation, exposure to high altitude typically lasts several hours, most commonly after

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

71. Pulmonary Hypertension, High Altitude (Diagnosis)

enzyme (ACE) gene. Genetic susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) has been attributed to variants of the endothelial nitric oxide synthetase gene ( NOS3 ). Individuals with a genetic risk for increased thrombosis may be at increased risk for HAPE. Chronic hypoxia, pulmonary venous hypertension, and increased pulmonary blood flow can markedly increase pulmonary pressures in many genetically susceptible individuals; these factors may be additive. At sea level, 25%-30% of adults (...) evidence to determine the effects of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions in treating high-altitude illness and indicated high-quality research is needed. [ ] The investigators noted low-quality evidence for dexamethasone and acetazolamide suggested these agents may reduce acute mountain sickness score relative to placebo, but their clinical benefits and harms remain unclear. High-altitude pulmonary edema High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

72. High-Altitude Cardiopulmonary Diseases (Overview)

), a spectrum that, in its severest form, can manifest as high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high-altitude cerebral edema. Fortunately, for most individuals, the symptoms are annoying but not incapacitating. The duration of these symptoms is brief, usually only several days. The development of AMS is directly related to the speed and height of the ascent and inversely related to age, as AMS is most common in the young. Symptoms observed in preverbal children include increased fussiness, decreased (...) appetite, poor sleep patterns, and decreased playfulness. High-altitude pulmonary edema Healthy children and active young adults exposed to moderate altitudes are at risk for HAPE. This is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that develops after an ascent to altitudes generally above 8000 ft (2438 m). The ascent is often rapid and is accomplished by means of either automobile or aircraft. In this situation, exposure to high altitude typically lasts several hours, most commonly after

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

73. High-Altitude Cardiopulmonary Diseases (Treatment)

), a spectrum that, in its severest form, can manifest as high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high-altitude cerebral edema. Fortunately, for most individuals, the symptoms are annoying but not incapacitating. The duration of these symptoms is brief, usually only several days. The development of AMS is directly related to the speed and height of the ascent and inversely related to age, as AMS is most common in the young. Symptoms observed in preverbal children include increased fussiness, decreased (...) appetite, poor sleep patterns, and decreased playfulness. High-altitude pulmonary edema Healthy children and active young adults exposed to moderate altitudes are at risk for HAPE. This is an unusual form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that develops after an ascent to altitudes generally above 8000 ft (2438 m). The ascent is often rapid and is accomplished by means of either automobile or aircraft. In this situation, exposure to high altitude typically lasts several hours, most commonly after

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

74. From The Archives: Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

away from poorly oxygenated areas, and vasodilation in other organs, namely in the brain, to improve delivery of oxygen. The body compensates with an increase in minute ventilation. In cases of altitude related illness it is not well understood what goes wrong but, essentially, these normal adaptations are inadequate or maladaptive. The term mountain sickness includes a spectrum of illnesses, namely the following entities: acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high (...) Diamox before going trekking in the Himalayas. You work at Bellevue in New York City: who climbs mountains here? What do you say? Why do illnesses develop from changes in altitude? The essential culprit is the fall in atmospheric pressure with an increase in altitude. While at sea level, barometric pressure (Pb) is ~760mm Hg (1atm), whereas at the summit of Mount Everest (~8800 meters high), this pressure drops to ~250mm Hg. The fraction of inspired oxygen remains constant (21% of air is made

2011 Clinical Correlations

75. Substrate Utilization, Exercise Performance, and Skeletal Muscle Response to Energy Deficit and Altitude Acclimatization

and/or the ability to participate in strenuous exercise Evidence of apnea or other sleeping disorders Evidence of prior high altitude pulmonary edema or high altitude cerebral edema diagnosis Allergies or intolerance to foods (including but not limited to lactose intolerance/milk allergy), vegetarian practices, or medications (including, but not limited to, lidocaine or phenylalanine) to be utilized in the study History of complications with lidocaine Taking medications that interfere with oxygen delivery (...) Posted : April 7, 2016 Last Update Posted : November 6, 2017 Sponsor: United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine Collaborator: Eastern Michigan University Information provided by (Responsible Party): United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This research will evaluate nutrition requirements for missions at high altitude (i.e. >7800 feet above sea level) and the information obtained can be used to optimize

2016 Clinical Trials

76. Viagra Helps Mountaineers Perform at Altitude

sickness, but it carries the risk for hypotension. There is evidence that sildenafil can be used to prevent high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and given its excellent safety profile, may prove to be a viable alternative. What is the usefulness of sildenafil in the prevention of HAPE and the improvement of aerobic capacity in young healthy adults at high altitudes? Methods: An exhaustive search of available literature was conducted using the search terms: [sildenafil or PDE or phosphodiesterase (...) Viagra Helps Mountaineers Perform at Altitude "Viagra Helps Mountaineers Perform at Altitude" by Philip Van Peursem < > > > > > Title Author Date of Graduation 12-11-2012 Degree Type Capstone Project Degree Name Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Rights . Abstract Background: Many people work and play at higher altitudes where hypoxia can cause altitude sickness and hamper one’s ability to carry out physical tasks. Nifedipine is currently the adjunct drug of choice for altitude

2012 Pacific University EBM Capstone Project

77. Solnatide demonstrates profound therapeutic activity in a rat model of pulmonary edema induced by acute hypobaric hypoxia and exercise. (PubMed)

hemorrhage and disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier than those of high-altitude control animals. Occludin expression was significantly higher in solnatide-treated animals, compared with high-altitude control, dexamethasone-, and aminophylline-treated animals.Solnatide reduced pulmonary edema, increased occludin expression, and improved gas-blood barrier function during acute hypobaric hypoxia and exercise in rats. These results provide a rationale for the clinical application of solnatide (...) to patients with pulmonary edema and exposure to a high-altitude hypoxic environment.Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Chest

78. Systemic pro-inflammatory response facilitates the development of cerebral edema during short hypoxia (PubMed)

Systemic pro-inflammatory response facilitates the development of cerebral edema during short hypoxia High-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is the severe type of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and life threatening. A subclinical inflammation has been speculated, but the exact mechanisms underlying the HACE are not fully understood.Human volunteers ascended to high altitude (3860 m, 2 days), and rats were exposed to hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber (5000 m, 2 days). Human acute mountain sickness (...) levels in human and rats, which positively correlated with AMS. A single LPS injection (ip, 4 mg/kg, 12 h) into rats increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the serum and cortex, and AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression in cortex and astrocytes, and astrocyte water permeability but did not cause brain edema. However, LPS treatment 11 h prior to 1 h hypoxia (elevation, 7000 m) challenge caused cerebral edema, which was associated with activation of NF-κB and MAPKs, hypoxia-reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Journal of neuroinflammation

79. [Bundle program of treatment for acute severe type high altitude disease]. (PubMed)

[Bundle program of treatment for acute severe type high altitude disease]. To discuss Bundle treatment of the acute severe type high altitude disease.The prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted. Two hundred and three patients with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) met inclusion criteria were included, and were randomly divided into Bundle treatment group (n = 125) and conventional treatment control group (n = 78). Critical patients

2013 Zhongguo wei zhong bing ji jiu yi xue = Chinese critical care medicine = Zhongguo weizhongbing jijiuyixue

80. Efficacy Study of Riociguat and Its Effects on Exercise Performance and Pulmonary Artery Pressure at High Altitude

31, 2013 Results First Posted : April 12, 2017 Last Update Posted : April 12, 2017 Sponsor: Richard Moon Information provided by (Responsible Party): Richard Moon, Duke University Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: During ascent to high altitude there is a physiologic response to hypoxia that results in an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure associated with decreased exercise performance, altitude-induced pulmonary hypertension, and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE (...) Efficacy Study of Riociguat and Its Effects on Exercise Performance and Pulmonary Artery Pressure at High Altitude Efficacy Study of Riociguat and Its Effects on Exercise Performance and Pulmonary Artery Pressure at High Altitude - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number

2013 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>