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Hepatotoxic Medication

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181. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Adults and Children: Official ATS/IDSA/CDC Clinical Practice Guidelines

Health, Nashville, Tennessee, 14 Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, and 15 University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock Background. Individuals infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may develop symptoms and signs of disease (tuber- culosis disease) or may have no clinical evidence of disease (latent tuberculosis infection [LTBI]). Tuberculosis disease is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet many questions related to its (...) in situations where an IGRA is not availa- ble, too costly, or too burdensome. Rationale Accuracy studies indicate that IGRAs are more specific and equally or more sensitive than TST in individuals who have received the BCG vaccination; therefore, false-positive results are less likely with IGRAs than TST. This is important because false-positive results may lead to unnecessary treatment and its accompanying risks (ie, hepatotoxicity) [96–98]. To minimize these risks, the guideline development panel chose

2017 American Thoracic Society

182. Management of Dyslipidaemia

outcome in individual patient care. Every health care provider is responsible for the management of his/her unique patient based on the clinical presentation and management options available locally. REVIEW OF THE GUIDELINE This guideline is issued in 2017 and will be reviewed in about 5 years or earlier if important new evidence becomes available. CPG Secretariat Health Technology Assessment Unit Medical Development Division Level 4, Block EI, Parcel E Government Offices Complex 62590 Putrajaya (...) Zambahari Chairperson: Dr Jeyamalar Rajadurai Dr Abdul Rashid Abdul Rahman Secretary: Expert Panel Members (in alphabetical order): Consultant Cardiologist, National Heart Institute Consultant Cardiologist, Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Selangor Consultant Physician, (Specialist in Cardiovascular Medicine), An-Nur Specialist Hospital Dr Al Fazir Omar Consultant Cardiologist, National Heart Institute, Kuala Lumpur Dr Alan Fong Yean Yip Consultant Cardiologist, Sarawak General Hospital Dr Aris Chandran

2017 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

183. Intestinal Rehabilitation Programs in the Management of Pediatric Intestinal Failure and Short Bowel Syndrome

Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition ABSTRACT Intestinal failure is a rare, debilitating condition that presents both acute and chronic medical management challenges. The condition is incompatible with life in the absence of the safe application of specialized and individu- alized medical therapy that includes surgery, medical equipment, nutritional products, and standard nursing care. Intestinal rehabilitation programs are best suited to provide such complex care with the goal of achieving enteral (...) autonomy and oral feeding with or without intestinal transplantation. These programs almost all include pediatric surgeons, pediatric gastroenterolo- gists, specialized nurses, and dietitians; many also include a variety of other medical and allied medical specialists. Intestinal rehabilitation programs provide integrated interdisciplinary care, more discussion of patient man- agement by involved specialists, continuity of care through various treat- ment interventions, close follow-up of outpatients

2017 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

184. NASPGHAN Clinical Practice Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Recommendations from the Expert Committee on NAFLD (ECON) and the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nu

any medication known to be hepatotoxic. There is insuf?cient evidence to guide frequency of monitoring for enzyme elevation after initiation of potentially hepatotoxic medications and monitoring should be guided by the baseline severity of the liver disease and the relative potential for hepatotoxicity of the medication. Strength: 1, Evidence: C 26. If potentially hepatotoxic drugs are being considered in patients with NAFLD, a baseline liver biopsy may be reasonable to consider for assessing (...) prior receipt of HB vaccine verified and be immunized if no prior vaccination was received. Strength: 1, Evidence: A Initiation and Monitoring of Potentially Hepatotoxic Medications Children with NAFLD occasionally require medications for other conditions such as diabetes, infections, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder, psychiatric illness, or other chronic ill- nesses. Certain medications commonly used for these conditions, are potentially hepatotoxic and require increased frequency

2017 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

185. Hepatic Issues and Complications Associated With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinical Report From the NASPGHAN Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Hepatology Committees

of the disease process, related to medication toxicity, or the result of an underlying primary hepatic disorder unrelated to IBD. This latter possibility is beyond the scope of this review article, but does need to be considered in anyone with elevated liver function tests. This review is provided as a clinical summary of some of the major hepatic issues that may occur in patients with IBD. KeyWords: autoimmune hepatitis, Crohn disease, hepatitis, in?ammatory bowel disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis (...) , ulcerative colitis (JPGN 2017;64: 639–652) H epatobiliary disorders are common in patients with inflamma- tory bowel disease (IBD), and persistent abnormal liver enzyme tests are found in approximately 20% to 30% of individuals with IBD (1–4). In most cases, the cause of these elevations will fall into 1 of 3 main categories. They can be a result of extraintestinal manifestations of the disease process, related to medication toxicity, or the result of an underlying primary hepatic disorder unrelated

2017 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

186. Evaluation of Abnormal Liver Chemistries

medications are associated with at least a small risk of elevation of ALT/AST/alkaline phos- phatase or bilirubin with or without hepatotoxicity. Common drug classes that may cause elevated liver chemistries include antibiotics, antiepileptics, nonsteroidal anti-infl ammatory agents, HMG-Co-A-reductase inhibitors (statins), anti-tuberculosis drugs, anti-retroviral treatment for HIV, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs, and some cancer chemothera- peutic agents. Of note, HMG-Co (...) --> obtain right upper quadrant ultrasound, evaluate for potential hepatotoxic medications, check AMA, ANA, and SMA If ductal dilatation --> ERCP, MRCP If no ductal dilatation --> check AMA, ANA, SMA If AMA negative and alkaline phosphatase > 2x ULN --> consider liver biopsy or MRCP If AMA negative and alkaline phosphatase 1-2x ULN --> consider observation If evaluation negative and alkaline phosphatase 1-2x ULN -> consider observation; If ductal dilatation identified --> ERCP or MRCP If AMA positive

2017 American College of Gastroenterology

187. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men with Chemotherapy-Naïve Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer PCO

-line hormonal therapies play a role in the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)? Target Population Chemotherapy-naïve men with CRPC maintained in a continuous or intermittent castrate state through orchiectomy or pharmacologic castration. The primary target population is asymptomatic men but also includes those with minimal symptoms. Target Audience Urologists, radiation, and medical oncologists. Methods Systematic review of the medical literature (...) evidence quality and strength of PCOs, slide sets, and clinical tools and resources, is available at . Patient information is available at . ASCO believes that cancer clinical trials are vital to inform medical decisions and improve cancer care and that all patients should have the opportunity to participate. Note: Opinions expressed in this article should not be interpreted as the official positions of any US or Canadian governmental agency, including the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes

2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

188. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

and Value, VA, Washington, DC & Office of Evidence Based Practice, U.S. Army Medical Command Version 2.0 – 2017 Based on evidence reviewed through October 21, 2016 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain September 2017 Page 3 of 110 Table of Contents I. Introduction 5 II. Recommendations 6 III. Background 9 A. Description of Low Back Pain 9 B. Epidemiology and Impact 10 a. General Population 10 b. Veterans Affairs Population 11 c. Department of Defense Population (...) and/or paraesthesia ? Neurogenic claudication ? Older age ? Severe/progressive lower extremity neurologic deficits ? Symptoms present for more than one month Cauda equina or conus medullaris syndrome ? Urinary retention ? Urinary or fecal incontinence ? Saddle anesthesia ? Changes in rectal tone ? Severe/progressive lower extremity neurologic deficits Abbreviation: LBP: low back pain B. Epidemiology and Impact a. General Population LBP is one of the most frequently experienced medical conditions in the general

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

189. Dyslipidaemias

Article Contents Article Navigation 2016 ESC/EAS Guidelines for the Management of Dyslipidaemias Alberico L Catapano (Chairperson) (Italy) Corresponding authors: Alberico L. Catapano, Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133 Milan, and Multimedica IRCCS (MI) Italy. Tel: +39 02 5031 8401, Fax: +39 02 5031 8386, E-mail: ; Ian Graham, Cardiology Department, Hermitage Medical Clinic, Old Lucan Road, Dublin 20, Dublin, Ireland. Tel: +353 1 (...) 6459715, Fax: +353 1 6459714, E-mail: Search for other works by this author on: Ian Graham (Chairperson) (Ireland) Corresponding authors: Alberico L. Catapano, Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133 Milan, and Multimedica IRCCS (MI) Italy. Tel: +39 02 5031 8401, Fax: +39 02 5031 8386, E-mail: ; Ian Graham, Cardiology Department, Hermitage Medical Clinic, Old Lucan Road, Dublin 20, Dublin, Ireland. Tel: +353 1 6459715, Fax: +353 1 6459714

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2016 European Society of Cardiology

190. Delirium in Adult Cancer Patients: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines

require close monitoring in a hospital setting, as it is important to avoid too rapid correction of severe hyponatraemia due to risk of osmotic demyelination syndrome [101]. Hepatotoxicity has been reported with tolvaptan [101]. Hypomagnesaemia. In advanced cancer patients, certain chemo- therapy medications, such as cisplatin or cetuximab, may cause signi?cant hypomagnesaemia [102]. In addition to confusion and hallucinations, other neurological symptoms associated with hypomagnesaemia include (...) IdiSNA, Pamplona; 10 ATLANTES Research Program, Institute for Culture and Society (ICS), University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 11 Division of Thoracic Oncology, Cardio-Thoracic Department, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 12 Department of Pharmacy, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada; 13 Department of Health Sciences, Hull York Medical School, University of York, York; 14 Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK; 15 Department of Rehabilitation, Aged Care Unit, Ancelle

2018 European Society for Medical Oncology

191. Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures

for the monitor- ing and management of pediatric patients during and after sedation for a procedure. 53–58 The purpose of this updated report is to unify the guidelines for sedation used by medical and dental practitioners; to add clarifications regarding moni- toring modalities, particularly regarding continuous expired carbon dioxide measurement; to provide updated information from the medical and dental literature; and to suggest methods for further improvement in safety and outcomes. This docu- ment uses (...) /electroence- phalography. EMS: Emergency medical services. LMA: Laryngeal mask airway. MRI: Magnetic resonance imaging. OSA: Obstructive sleep apnea. PALS: Pediatric advanced life support. Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures: Update 2016 Developed and Endorsed by American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and American Academy of Pediatrics Latest Revision* 2016 * This guideline was originally adopted in 2006

2016 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

192. Treatment of HIV-1-positive adults with antiretroviral therapy (interim update)

potential adverse effects; ? Concerns with possible adverse social consequences, such as disclosure or interference with lifestyle; ? Confidence that they will be able to adhere to the medication (self-efficacy); ? Psychological or neurocognitive issues that could impact on adherence; ? Socio-economic factors that could impact on adherence, including, but not limited to, poverty, housing, immigration status or domestic violence; ? Pregnancy or parenting plans. Community advocacy and peer support

2017 British HIV Association

193. Targeted Immunomodulators for the Treatment of Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis: Effectiveness and Value

Staff/Consultants University of Washington School of Pharmacy Modeling Group* Jeffrey A. Linder, MD, MPH, FACP Associate Professor of Medicine Division of General Medicine and Primary Care Brigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Institute for Clinical and Economic Review Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer Institute for Clinical and Economic Review Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Institute for Clinical and Economic (...) for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research organization that evaluates medical evidence and convenes public deliberative bodies to help stakeholders interpret and apply evidence to improve patient outcomes and control costs. ICER receives funding from government grants, non-profit foundations, health plans, provider groups, and health industry manufacturers. For a complete list of funders, visit http://www.icer- review.org/about/support/. Through all its work, ICER seeks

2016 California Technology Assessment Forum

194. British Association of Dermatologists and British Photodermatology Group guidelines for the safe and effective use of psoralen ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy

. Sarkany 2 and R.S. Dawe 5 1 Dermatology Centre and 7 Dermatology Research Centre, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, Manchester M6 8HD, U.K. 2 Department of Dermatology, University College Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU, U.K. 3 British Association of Dermatologists, Willan House, 4 Fitzroy Square, London W1T 5HQ, U.K. 4 Department of Dermatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds LS7 4SA, U.K. 5 Department of Dermatology, Ninewells (...) Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 9SY, U.K. 6 Department of Dermatology, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast BT9 7AB, U.K. Correspondence Tsui C. Ling. E-mail: tsui.ling@srft.nhs.uk Accepted for publication 19 October 2015 Funding sources None. Con?icts of interest T.H.C. has received an advisory board payment from Johnson & Johnson; and a confer- ence organizing fee from Galderma; S.I. has received travel expenses and honoraria from Galderma, Spirit and Ambicare Health

2016 British Association of Dermatologists

195. Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning

. No statistical analysis. Few patients. Unclear if patients cared by transplant unit were transplanted or not. Care by liver transplant unit 66,6% (Sil) vs 0% (No sil) Mengs, U., et al. 2012 Germany 1491 patients with amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning (from published and unpublished data) treated with silibinin (as monotherapy or combined with other medication). Review of the literature Mortality 107/1491 (7,2%) Main author is consulting for the R&D department of Madaus-Rottapharm. No control group (...) patients, 624/1632 (38,2%) patients received silibinin (as monotherapy or combined with other medication). Meta-analysis Combined outcome of mortality and liver transplant 5,4% (Sil) vs 47,3% (Support) (p≤ 0.01) Study protocol unclear (database searched, terms used, etc.). Was it systematic? Very complex results analysis. Some results and mortality rates doesn't seem to correlate. Publication bias? Combined outcome of mortality and liver transplant 5,4% (Sil) vs 7,9% (Sil + Pen) (p> 0.05) Combined

2016 BestBETS

196. Integrating collaborative TB and HIV services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs

services within a comprehensive package of care for people who inject drugs | Consolidated Guidelines I. Acronyms AIDS acquired immunodeficiency syndrome APRI aminotransferase/platelet ratio index ART antiretroviral therapy ASSIST Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening T est CHB chronic hepatitis B CI confidence interval CPT co-trimoxazole preventive therapy DAA direct-acting antiviral (drug) DIH drug-induced hepatotoxicity DNA deoxyribonucleic acid FIB-4 Fibrosis-4 score GRC Guideline (...) for people who inject drugs | Consolidated Guidelines II. Definition of key terms People who inject drugs (PWID) refers to people who inject psychotropic (or psychoactive) substances for non- medical purposes. These drugs include opioids, amphetamine-type stimulants, cocaine, hypnotics/sedatives and hallucinogens. Injection may be through intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous routes. The definition does not include people who self-inject medicines for medical purposes, or individuals who self-inject

2016 World Health Organisation HIV Guidelines

197. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications

with today’s myriad healthcare-associated factors that predispose to infection. Moreover, changes in pathogen prevalence, in particular a more common staphylococcal origin, have affected outcomes, which have not improved despite medical and surgical advances. Methods and Results— This statement updates the 2005 iteration, both of which were developed by the American Heart Association under the auspices of the Committee on Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease, Council on Cardiovascular (...) sensitive for disease detection and specific for its exclusion across all forms of the disease. In 1994, Durack and colleagues from the Duke University Medical Center proposed a diagnostic schema that stratified patients with suspected IE into 3 categories: definite, possible, and rejected cases ( and ). Table 2. Definition of IE According to the Modified Duke Criteria Definite IE Pathological criteria Microorganisms demonstrated by culture or histological examination of a vegetation, a vegetation

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2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

198. Recommendations for Management of Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interactions With Statins and Select Agents Used in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

: Introduction A drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a pharmacokinetic or pharmacological influence of 1 medication on another that differs from the known or anticipated effects of each agent alone. A DDI may result in a change in either drug efficacy or drug toxicity for 1 or both of the interacting medications. Pharmacokinetic DDIs result in altered absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a medication. A pharmacodynamic DDI occurs when 1 medication modifies the pharmacological effect of another (...) in an additive, a synergistic, or an antagonistic fashion. It is estimated that ≈2.8% of hospital admissions occur as a direct result of DDIs. However, the actual incidence of hospitalization secondary to clinically significant DDIs is likely to be highly underestimated because medication-related issues are more commonly reported as adverse drug reactions. Complex underlying disease states also may make recognizing a DDI more challenging, further contributing to a lower reported incidence. The overall

2016 American Heart Association

199. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia

Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha Correspondence: A. C. Kalil, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5400 ( ). Search for other works by this author on: Mark L. Metersky 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington Search for other works by this author on: Michael Klompas 3Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School4Harvard (...) 13Thoraxzentrum Ruhrgebiet, Department of Respiratory and Infectious Diseases, EVK Herne and Augusta-Kranken-Anstalt Bochum, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Paul D. Fey 14Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha Search for other works by this author on: Thomas M. File, Jr 15Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio Search for other works by this author on: Marcos I. Restrepo 16Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, South

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2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

200. Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Aspergillosis

. Search for other works by this author on: George R. Thompson, III 2University of California, Davis Search for other works by this author on: David W. Denning 3National Aspergillosis Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, University of Manchester, United Kingdom Search for other works by this author on: Jay A. Fishman 4Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School Search for other works by this author on: Susan Hadley 5Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts Search for other (...) works by this author on: Raoul Herbrecht 6University of Strasbourg, France Search for other works by this author on: Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis 7University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Search for other works by this author on: Kieren A. Marr 8Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland Search for other works by this author on: Vicki A. Morrison 9Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

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2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

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