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HIV Risk Screening Questions

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1. Syphilis Screening for Low-Risk Clients Visiting a Sexual Health Clinic: A focused practice question

Syphilis Screening for Low-Risk Clients Visiting a Sexual Health Clinic: A focused practice question Syphilis screening for low- risk clients visiting a sexual health clinic: A focused practice question Sue Fernane, Analyst, Research and Policy Barbara Fowler, Manager Healthy Sexuality Program Communicable Diseases Region of Peel Public Health November 2015 i Table of Contents Key Messages 2 1 Background 3 2 Literature Review Question 4 3 Literature Search 4 4 Relevance Assessment 5 5 Results (...) Sexuality clinical results. 4 While certain sexual behaviours or factors leading to a higher risk of acquiring syphilis are well documented in the literature, this focused practice question (FPQ) seeks to clarify the value and need for routine screening of all clients attending Peel sexual health clinics, including those at low risk of acquiring syphilis. Clients at lower risk for syphilis acquisition would include individuals that: are heterosexual with solely heterosexual partners, WSW (women who have

2016 Peel Health Library

2. A cross-jurisdictional review of HIV testing intervals for population groups at high risk of HIV infection

, , , , , , , , , , Question At what intervals do high-income jurisdictions encourage population groups at high risk of HIV infection to come forward for routine testing? Key take-home messages Most guidelines recommend at least annual HIV testing of population groups at high risk of HIV infection. These include: men who have sex with men, transgender women and men, people who use injection drugs, African, Caribbean and Black communities, indigenous people, and women at risk. Some guidelines recommend more frequent (...) of offering more frequent screening (e.g., once every three or six months) to individual men who have sex with men at increased risk for acquiring HIV infection, weighing their individual risk factors, local HIV epidemiology, and local testing policies (4, 5). Few guidelines provide recommendations about HIV testing frequency of transgender women and men, African, Caribbean and Black communities, indigenous people, and women at risk, but most usually recommend at least annual testing (3, 6–10). The issue

2019 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

3. HIV Risk Screening Questions

HIV Risk Screening Questions HIV Risk Screening Questions Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 HIV Risk Screening Questions (...) HIV Risk Screening Questions Aka: HIV Risk Screening Questions , High Risk Behavior Counseling , HIV Screening Questions From Related Chapters II. History: Questions regarding overall HIV risk What are you doing to put yourself at risk for HIV? What are the riskiest things that you are doing? If your were to be positive... How would you have become infected? When was the last time you put yourself at HIV risk? III. History: Questions about specific behaviors How do or drugs influence your HIV risk

2018 FP Notebook

4. Public health guidance on antenatal screening for HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella susceptibility in the EU/EEA ? addressing the vulnerable populations

implications for public health practice and research 1 1 Introduction 2 1.1 Objectives and target audience 2 1.2 Questions addressed 2 2 Background 3 2.1 Epidemiological and policy context in the EU/EEA 3 3 Guidance development 4 3.1 Member States survey 4 3.2 Literature reviews 4 3.2.1 Literature review on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening for HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella susceptibility 4 3.2.2 Literature review on antenatal screening approaches that are effective (...) population whereby refusal does not lead to immediate negative consequences, restrictions of civil rights or sanctions for the individual belonging to that population. Vulnerable populations For the purpose of this guidance, subpopulation groups that are at increased risk of contracting HIV, HBV, syphilis or rubella during pregnancy or are already infected, and are hard to reach through antenatal screening programmes. SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Antenatal screening for HIV, hep B, syphilis and rubella

2017 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

5. Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing MTCT of HIV, HBV, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations

groups that are at increased risk of contracting HIV, HBV, syphilis or rubella during pregnancy or are already infected, and are hard to reach through antenatal screening programmes. Antenatal screening approaches effective in preventing MTCT of HIV, HBV, syphilis and rubella in vulnerable populations TECHNICAL REPORT 1 Executive summary Background As part of a project to map antenatal screening practices on HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella susceptibility, a survey was conducted to identify (...) was performed. The purpose of the review was to provide an evidence-base for a guidance on strengthening antenatal screening programmes for infections in the EU/EEA countries. Methods The research question (PICO) was formulated to include: P (population) pregnant women belonging to vulnerable groups and their unborn children, I (intervention) any screening or other intervention offered to pregnant women for HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and for rubella susceptibility, and PMTCT intervention for those

2017 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Literature Reviews

6. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening for HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella susceptibility

that are at increased risk of contracting HIV, HBV, syphilis or rubella during pregnancy or are already infected, and are hard to reach through antenatal screening programmes. TECHNICAL REPORT Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening for HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis and rubella susceptibility 1 Executive summary Background This literature review of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antenatal screening was conducted as part of a project evaluating the effectiveness of antenatal screening (...) effectiveness. The following national antenatal screening programmes were considered cost-effective in comparison with no screening or screening only targeted risk groups: syphilis in Norway and the United Kingdom; HIV in the Netherlands, Australia and New Zealand; hepatitis B in the United Kingdom and Belgium; rubella susceptibility in the Netherlands, especially if targeted at non-vaccinated pregnant women. This review also showed that only a small number of cost-effectiveness studies has been conducted

2017 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Literature Reviews

7. Strategies for effectively communicating the risk of HIV transmission

Strategies for effectively communicating the risk of HIV transmission Strategies for effectively communicating the risk of HIV transmission | The Ontario HIV Treatment Network The Ontario HIV Treatment Network Strategies for effectively communicating the risk of HIV transmission Strategies for effectively communicating the risk of HIV transmission , , , Questions What effective methods exist for communicating the risk of HIV transmission? Key take-home messages Probability information alone may (...) ), but emphasizing the costs of not completing the screening (e.g., the probability of worse outcomes with later detection) was found to be more effective than a gain-framed message at encouraging people to get screened. What we did We searched Medline using a combination of [Risk Communication AND [HIV infection, or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or HIV (MeSH terms)]. This search was conducted on June 9, 2016. Results were limited to English articles published from

2018 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

8. Health technology assessment of a PrEP programme for populations at substantial risk of sexual acquisition of HIV

Health technology assessment of a PrEP programme for populations at substantial risk of sexual acquisition of HIV Health technology assessment of a PrEP programme for populations at substantial risk of sexual acquisition of HIV 14 June 2019 Health technology assessment of a PrEP programme for populations at substantial risk of sexual acquisition of HIV Health Information and Quality Authority Page 2 of 257 Health technology assessment of a PrEP programme for populations at substantial risk (...) at substantial risk of sexual acquisition of HIV Health Information and Quality Authority Page 4 of 257 4.4 Discussion 112 5 Systematic review of economic evaluations 116 5.1 Introduction 117 5.2 Methods 117 5.3 Results 119 5.4 Discussion 133 6 Economic evaluation 135 6.1 Methods 137 6.2 Clinical and epidemiological parameter estimates 140 6.3 Process for calibrating model 167 6.4 Cost effectiveness analysis results 173 6.5 Budget impact analysis 184 6.6 Discussion 198 7 Organisational issues 205 7.1

2019 Health Information and Quality Authority

9. Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers

transmitted infections (STIs), sexual or physical violence, incarceration, and reproductive coercion than the general population. Adolescents also may be at higher risk. Women who engage in sex work should receive all appropriate cancer screenings and vaccinations recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Be aware of the special needs of this population for preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (See Committee Opinion No. 595 (...) Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers - ACOG Menu ▼ Improving Awareness of and Screening for Health Risks Among Sex Workers Page Navigation ▼ Number 708, July 2017 Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women in collaboration with Jennefer

2017 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

10. Improving healthcare providers? face-to-face interactions with clients living with or at-risk for HIV

Improving healthcare providers? face-to-face interactions with clients living with or at-risk for HIV RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE | #111, AUGUST 2016 1 RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE THE ONTARIO HIV TREATMENT NETWORK Question • What face-to-face interventions have proven effective in helping providers educate clients and improve their health literacy? References 1. Price-Haywood EG, Harden- Barrios J, Cooper LA. Comparative effectiveness of audit-feedback versus additional physician communication training (...) , service delivery and advocacy. In response to a question from the field, the Rapid Response Team reviews the scientific and grey literature, consults with experts, and prepares a brief fact sheet summarizing the current evidence and its implications for policy and practice. Suggested Citation Rapid Response Service. Improving healthcare providers’ face-to-face interactions with clients living with or at-risk for HIV. Toronto, ON: Ontario HIV Treatment Network; August 2016. Prepared by Shayna Sparling

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

11. Impact of Integrated HIV/NCD Screening on HIV Testing Uptake and Engagement in HIV Care In Kisarawe, Tanzania

Impact of Integrated HIV/NCD Screening on HIV Testing Uptake and Engagement in HIV Care In Kisarawe, Tanzania Impact of Integrated HIV/NCD Screening on HIV Testing Uptake and Engagement in HIV Care In Kisarawe, Tanzania - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Impact of Integrated HIV/NCD Screening on HIV Testing Uptake and Engagement in HIV Care In Kisarawe, Tanzania The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

2017 Clinical Trials

12. Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question

the health effects of cannabis use. In alignment with public health’s mandate, and in response to local need, ROP-PH seeks to understand the health impacts, including the risks and benefits, of recreational cannabis use. This will inform the development of key messages, which will be shared with the public and other stakeholders, including health professionals and educators. 2 Literature Review Question What are the physical, mental and social health effects of recreational cannabis use? 3 Literature (...) Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use A Focused Practice Question Region of Peel – Public Health Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Division & Family Health Division August 2019 Please use the following citation when referencing this document: Region of Peel – Public Health. Understanding the health effects of recreational cannabis use: A focused practice question. Mississauga

2019 Peel Health Library

13. Strategies to link people with undiagnosed HIV infection to HIV testing, care, and prevention services

analysis in New Zealand examined missed opportunities among adults presenting to a hospital offering risk-based screening (12). Results showed that nearly 34% of individuals who were newly diagnosed over a seven-year period had had contact with medical services prior to diagnosis, and within their estimated window of HIV infection. They also showed that these patients could have been diagnosed earlier by a median of 12 months. Furthermore, more than half of these missed opportunity visits were (...) education on HIV testing best practices and outcomes (28). Following the implementation of FOCUS in a New York health centre that previously conducted risk-based screening, the percentage of patients tested for HIV increased from 8% to 56% (28). The proportion of newly diagnosed cases also increased from 16% to 29% of all HIV-positive cases. Finally, 81% of all individuals diagnosed with HIV during the evaluation period were linked to HIV care, none of whom were previously engaged in care. At a New

2019 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

14. Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression. (PubMed)

. A previous psychiatric history and substance abuse were independently associated with an increased risk of depression.We suggest that the mental health of HIV-infected individuals should be reviewed and a "risk-flag" three-step approach should be used (1) to screen routinely with the two verbal questions suggested by the EACS, (2) to identify whether there is a risk of depression and then screen with the BDI-II, and (3) to identify whether there is still a risk and then perform a full evaluation (...) Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression. Studies have shown that depression and other mental illnesses are under-diagnosed among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mental health history and questionnaire-based screening instruments to identify HIV-infected individuals at risk of depression.The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) was used to assess the prevalence

2016 HIV medicine

15. MOBILE SCREENING TO IDENTIFY AND FOLLOW-UP WITH HIGH RISK, HIV NEGATIVE YOUTH (PubMed)

MOBILE SCREENING TO IDENTIFY AND FOLLOW-UP WITH HIGH RISK, HIV NEGATIVE YOUTH HIV prevalence remains disproportionately high among youth, especially among young men who have sex with men, young people with substance use disorders, and recently incarcerated youth. However, youth may not report behavioral risks because they fear stigma or legal consequences. While routine HIV screening programs have increased testing, current programs are not designed to identify, or provide prevention services (...) to, high-risk patients who test HIV negative.To examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of: a tablet-based screening designed to facilitate HIV risk reporting and testing among a sample of young urban emergency department (ED) patients; and a text message-based follow up protocol for patients who test HIV-negative and report increased behavioral risk.100 ED patients aged 18 - 24, who declined HIV tests offered at triage, completed a tablet-based intervention that included a risk screening

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2016 Journal of mobile technology in medicine

16. Environmental Factors Associated with Increased Rat Populations: A Focused Practice Question

transmission capable of causing significant morbidity and mortality 1 . In 2015-2016 the number of rat-related complaints reported to Peel Public Health was higher compared to previous years. This upward trend in rat sightings does not appear to be unique to Peel region. A focused practice question is being conducted to review the environmental factors associated with increased rat population in urban cities. The background literature review summarizes the human health risks associated with exposure to 11 (...) zoonoses, it is those with low socioeconomic status and the marginalized populations who are at the highest risk for exposure and infections 3 . Inadequate standard of living, poor sanitation and hygiene, crowding, homelessness, intravenous drug usage and immunosuppressive diseases (e.g. HIV/AIDS) are contributing factors 3,4 . The following sections will provide a summary of the most common rat- associated zoonoses in urban centres. Bacterial zoonoses Leptospira interrogans causes leptospirosis

2018 Peel Health Library

17. Does it ever make sense to target HPV screening at HIV-infected individuals?

) in order to prevent cervical cancer. The question of more targeted interventions generally arises in relation to MSM – and especially HIV+ MSM – on account of their heightened risk of HPV-induced anal cancers. There has been a marked rise in these cancers since the 1980s. Unlike cervical cancers in heterosexual women (which decline with age), anal cancers are prevalent in MSM of all ages ( (STI)) – possibly reflecting higher rates of exposure through new partners. Particularly high rates of anal cancer (...) Does it ever make sense to target HPV screening at HIV-infected individuals? Does it ever make sense to target HPV screening at HIV-infected individuals? | Sexually Transmitted Infections by A number of recent studies have considered the case for HPV-related cancer prevention interventions that are targeted at specific populations. In the developed world, interventions of cervical screening and teenage vaccination aim to cover the female, or male and female, population (at a certain age

2017 Sexually Transmitted Infections blog

18. HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) Screening and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

are living with HIV, 10–20% of whom do not know their HIV status. Early diagnosis of HIV infection not only reduces the risk of morbidity and mortality in affected individuals, it also reduces the risk of HIV transmission to others. Screening Recommendations Table 1. Screening for HIV The HIV screening test for all populations is a fourth-generation antigen and antibody combo assay with reflex to the confirmatory HIV-1/HIV-2 and RNA viral load tests. Eligible population Frequency General population (ages (...) 15 through 64) One time Adolescents and adults at increased risk Use clinical judgment: • For patients with frequent exposure to HIV risks, every 3–6 months • For patients with occasional exposure to HIV risks, consider screening at least annually (See the “Indications for Periodic HIV Screening” section on page 3.) Pregnant women • At first prenatal visit for each pregnancy • For women at high risk of STIs, consider also testing in 3 rd trimester (For women presenting in labor without prior

2013 Kaiser Permanente Clinical Guidelines

19. Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV in adults at high risk: Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil)

been concerns that sexual behaviour could become more high-risk if people are taking PrEP . However, providing PrEP may increase access to other health services such as HIV testing, sexually transmitted infection and hepatitis B screening, and support for high-risk sexual behaviour and recreational drug and alcohol use. Monitoring such data at a population level is important to assess the ongoing impact of PrEP . Resource implications Resource implications The NHS list price of Truvada is £355.73 (...) Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV in adults at high risk: Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil) Pre-e Pre-exposure proph xposure prophylaxis of HIV in adults at high ylaxis of HIV in adults at high risk: T risk: T ruvada ( ruvada (emtricitabine/tenofo emtricitabine/tenofovir disopro vir disoproxil) xil) Evidence summary Published: 5 October 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/esnm78 pathways K Ke ey points from the e y points from the evidence vidence The content of this evidence summary was up

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

20. Randomised Study Comparing Two HIV Screening Strategies

conditions listed have an association with HIV infection and 2) to be able to identify their patients as coming from at-risk populations. In other countries, notably the United States, France and the United Kingdom, national HIV testing recommendations propose non-targeted screening whereby everyone presenting to a medical facility is tested if the HIV seroprevalence in the catchment population is above a defined threshold (0.1% for the US and France; 0.2% for the UK). As HIV seroprevalence (...) will be invited to complete a questionnaire on HIV risk factors and, if one or more risk factors are present, they will be informed that HIV testing is indicated and will be invited to take a free rapid HIV test. Non-targeted arm patients will be provided with information about HIV and HIV testing and will then be invited to take a free rapid HIV test without any questions regarding risk factors. Patients in each arm who are either not offered (targeted arm) or who decline rapid testing (non-targeted arm

2017 Clinical Trials

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