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HIPAA

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3261. HIPAA and research: how have the first two years gone? (PubMed)

HIPAA and research: how have the first two years gone? To assess the impact of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) on research in ophthalmology.A personal perspective with a review of relevant publications.Review of experience at a single institution as it transitioned to enforcing HIPAA guidelines.HIPAA has been costly to institutions and will continue to be so. At Johns Hopkins alone, nearly 26,000 employees have had to take HIPAA compliance training and pass (...) examinations with an overall estimated cost of nearly $2 million in the first year. At the same time, complying with HIPAA regulations has increased institutional awareness of privacy issues.HIPAA has added a layer of regulation to research that has increased the burden of researchers but is unlikely to prevent most research from taking place. Although there are clear benefits to the heightened awareness of the implications of research on study subjects' privacy, the costs of implementing HIPAA have been

2006 American Journal of Ophthalmology

3262. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): its broad effect on practice. (PubMed)

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): its broad effect on practice. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and its final rule, raised fears among practitioners of new and complex regulations that might interfere with medical practice, lead to inadvertent liability and unwanted expense. It generated a dizzying set of health-care administrative activities and a new work for legal consultants. It has extensive scope, and includes most health (...) plans and practitioners. It has regulated both privacy and security, including electronic, paper, and oral communications. However, after a HIPAA compliant office structure is established, and the privacy notice is reviewed and signed by the patient, disclosure of medical information for treatment, payment or "health-care operations" is permitted without recurrent consent forms, thus allowing substantially familiar patterns of doctor-to-doctor communication about treatment. Further, the initial

2005 American Journal of Gastroenterology

3263. HIPAA compliance efforts. (PubMed)

HIPAA compliance efforts. Identify the regulations from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) that impact the emergency department. Describe processes that demonstrate compliance with the security and privacy regulations that pertain to protected health information. Identify the consequences of noncompliance to this congressional mandate.A review of the literature was conducted to extract the effects of the legislation on emergency services. Since the inception

2004 Pediatric Emergency Care

3264. HIPAA enhancements to improve emergency department security. (PubMed)

HIPAA enhancements to improve emergency department security. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) seems to be as useful as is capitalism to the medically uninsured (or perhaps, as necessary as another leukotriene inhibitor for asthma). Is the emergency medical community doing enough? Can we improve on HIPAA to increase privacy in the emergency department? HIPAA regulations are reviewed in all their wondrous complexity and simplified so that even your medical director

2004 Annals of Emergency Medicine

3265. From Hippocrates to HIPAA: privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine--Part I: conceptual, moral, and legal foundations. (PubMed)

From Hippocrates to HIPAA: privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine--Part I: conceptual, moral, and legal foundations. Respect for patient privacy and confidentiality is an ancient and a contemporary professional responsibility of physicians. Carrying out this responsibility may be more challenging and more important in the emergency department than in many other clinical settings. Part I of this 2-part article outlines the basic concepts of privacy and confidentiality, reviews

2005 Annals of Emergency Medicine

3266. From Hippocrates to HIPAA: privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine--Part II: Challenges in the emergency department. (PubMed)

From Hippocrates to HIPAA: privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine--Part II: Challenges in the emergency department. Part I of this article reviewed the concepts of privacy and confidentiality and described the moral and legal foundations and limits of these values in health care. Part II highlights specific privacy and confidentiality issues encountered in the emergency department (ED). Discussed first are physical privacy issues in the ED, including problems of ED design

2005 Annals of Emergency Medicine

3267. An integrative framework for HIPAA-compliant I*IQ healthcare information systems. (PubMed)

An integrative framework for HIPAA-compliant I*IQ healthcare information systems. Currently the healthcare industry in the US is not only contending with relentless pressures to lower costs while maintaining and increasing the quality of service but is also under a stringent timeline to become compliant with the health insurance, portability and accountability act (HIPAA) regulatory requirements. Robust healthcare information systems (HCIS) become critical to enabling healthcare organizations (...) address these challenges. Hence, it becomes an imperative need that the information that is captured, generated and disseminated by these HCIS be of the highest possible integrity and quality as well as compliant with regulatory requirements. This paper addresses this need by proposing an integrative framework for HIPAA compliant, I*IQ HCIS. It bases this framework on an integration of the requirements for HIPAA compliance, the principles of information integrity, as well as the healthcare quality

2004 International journal of health care quality assurance

3268. Prospective study of clinician-entered research data in the Emergency Department using an Internet-based system after the HIPAA Privacy Rule. (PubMed)

Prospective study of clinician-entered research data in the Emergency Department using an Internet-based system after the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Design and test the reliability of a web-based system for multicenter, real-time collection of data in the emergency department (ED), under waiver of authorization, in compliance with HIPAA.This was a phase I, two-hospital study of patients undergoing evaluation for possible pulmonary embolism. Data were collected by on-duty clinicians on an HTML data

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2004 Medical Informatics and Decision Making

3269. Local perspective of the impact of the HIPAA privacy rule on research. (PubMed)

Local perspective of the impact of the HIPAA privacy rule on research. The operational and economic impact of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 was evaluated. The setting was a natural experiment which involved a single-site, clinical research study that was initiated before the enactment of HIPAA and subsequently modified to be compliant with the new policy.A formative assessment was conducted of the recruitment process to a clinical trial evaluating (...) the efficacy of an educational strategy to inform Veterans about the National Cancer Institute/Department of Veterans Affairs cosponsored Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT). Personnel time and costs were determined based on weekly accrual for study periods before and after the implementation of HIPAA. Root cause analysis was used to assess the recruitment protocol and to identify areas for improvement.The implementation of HIPAA resulted in a 72.9% decrease in patient accrual (7.0

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2006 Cancer

3270. Where Is HIPAA Taking Physician Practices? (PubMed)

Where Is HIPAA Taking Physician Practices? 16369443 2006 06 21 2018 11 13 1531-0132 7 2 2005 Apr 20 MedGenMed : Medscape general medicine MedGenMed Where is HIPAA taking physician practices? 65 Bergeron Bryan B Health Sciences and Technology Division, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. eng Journal Article 2005 04 20 United States MedGenMed 100894134 1531-0132 IM Computer Security legislation & jurisprudence standards Confidentiality

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2005 Medscape General Medicine

3271. Multidimensional Analysis: A Management Tool for Monitoring HIPAA Compliance and Departmental Performance (PubMed)

Multidimensional Analysis: A Management Tool for Monitoring HIPAA Compliance and Departmental Performance Most RIS and PACS systems include extensive auditing capabilities as part of their security model, but inspecting those audit logs to obtain useful information can be a daunting task. Manual analysis of audit trails, though cumbersome, is often resorted to because of the difficulty to construct queries to extract complex information from the audit logs. The approach proposed by the authors

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2004 Journal of Digital Imaging

3272. Physician PDA Use and the HIPAA Privacy Rule (PubMed)

Physician PDA Use and the HIPAA Privacy Rule Physicians need better access to information when making patient care decisions. Hospitals should allow electronic data transfers to physician PDAs to improve patient care, and physicians must institute measures to secure the confidentiality of patient information on their PDAs. By explicitly excluding copies from their designated record set, hospitals need not maintain copies or track access of information on personally owned PDAs.

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2003 AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings

3273. HIPAA's implications for public health policy and practice: guidance from the CDC. (PubMed)

HIPAA's implications for public health policy and practice: guidance from the CDC. 15192909 2004 06 24 2017 02 14 0033-3549 119 2 2004 Mar-Apr Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974) Public Health Rep HIPAA's implications for public health policy and practice: guidance from the CDC. 216-9 Kamoie Brian B Department of Health Policy, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, USA. Hodge James G JG Jr eng Journal Article United States Public Health Rep

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2004 Public Health Reports

3274. A HIPAA-Compliant Architecture for Securing Clinical Images (PubMed)

A HIPAA-Compliant Architecture for Securing Clinical Images The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA, instituted April 2003) Security Standards mandate health institutions to protect health information against unauthorized use or disclosure. One approach to addressing this mandate is by utilizing user access control and generating audit trails of the various authorized as well as unauthorized user access of health data. Although most current clinical image systems [e.g (...) ., picture archiving and communication system (PACS)] have components that generate log files for application debugging purposes, there is a lack of methodology to obtain and synthesize the pertinent data from the large volumes of log data generated by these multiple components within a PACS. We have designed a HIPAA-compliant architecture specifically for tracking and auditing the image workflow of clinical imaging systems such as PACS. As an initial first step, we developed HIPAA-compliant auditing

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2005 Journal of Digital Imaging

3275. Are We Really Better Off With HIPAA? (PubMed)

Are We Really Better Off With HIPAA? 16614675 2006 06 20 2008 11 20 1531-0132 7 4 2005 Nov 21 MedGenMed : Medscape general medicine MedGenMed Are we really better off with HIPAA? 53 Frishauf Peter P eng Editorial 2005 11 21 United States MedGenMed 100894134 1531-0132 IM MedGenMed. 2006;8(1):18, author reply 18 16967546 MedGenMed. 2006;8(1):18; author reply 18 16967538 MedGenMed. 2006;8(1):18; author reply 18 16967539 MedGenMed. 2006;8(1):18; author reply 18 16967545 MedGenMed. 2006;8(1):18

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2005 Medscape General Medicine

3276. Passive consent for clinical research in the age of HIPAA. (PubMed)

Passive consent for clinical research in the age of HIPAA. Federal laws and regulations, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, intended primarily to protect individuals, have been described as significant barriers to the use of clinical registries and other population-based tools for health care research. Although these regulations allow for the waiver or alteration of usual consent procedures when the research meets certain specific criteria

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2006 Journal of General Internal Medicine

3277. Do characteristics of HIPAA consent forms affect the response rate? (PubMed)

Do characteristics of HIPAA consent forms affect the response rate? Under the The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Privacy Rule, researchers are required to obtain written authorization from patients to gain access to protected health information. The purpose of this research was to examine how the characteristics of authorization forms used by hospitals affect the likelihood of consent.This work reports on a recent telephone survey (administered January to August 2004

2007 Medical Care

3278. Potential impact of the HIPAA privacy rule on data collection in a registry of patients with acute coronary syndrome. (PubMed)

Potential impact of the HIPAA privacy rule on data collection in a registry of patients with acute coronary syndrome. Implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule has the potential to affect data collection in outcomes research.To examine the extent to which data collection may be affected by the HIPAA Privacy Rule, we used a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest study design to assess participation rates with informed consent in 2 cohorts (...) of patients eligible for the University of Michigan Acute Coronary Syndrome registry. The pre-HIPAA period included telephone interviews conducted at 6 months that sought verbal informed consent from patients. In the post-HIPAA period, informed consent forms were mailed to ask for permission to call to conduct a telephone interview. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients who provided consent. Incremental costs associated with the post-HIPAA period were also assessed.The pre-HIPAA

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2005 Archives of Internal Medicine

3279. Inherited medullary thyroid cancer and the duty to warn: revisiting Pate v. Threlkel in light of HIPAA. (PubMed)

Inherited medullary thyroid cancer and the duty to warn: revisiting Pate v. Threlkel in light of HIPAA. Familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC) is one of the few autosomal dominant cancers for which genetic testing provides a clear medical indication for prophylactic and/or curative therapy, and for which prophylactic thyroidectomy, followed by thyroid hormone replacement, presents a relatively low morbidity risk. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a particularly aggressive type of thyroid (...) confidentiality legislation, known as the HIPAA Privacy Rules, which came into effect April 12, 2003.

2005 Thyroid

3280. Reducing family members' anxiety while waiting on the day of surgery: systematic review of studies and implications of HIPAA health information privacy rules. (PubMed)

Reducing family members' anxiety while waiting on the day of surgery: systematic review of studies and implications of HIPAA health information privacy rules. To investigate changes that most surgical suites will need to make in the process of giving reports to family members on the day of surgery by the compliance date (April 14, 2003) of the privacy regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) of 1996.Systematic review of the medical literature on ways (...) if the case is running later than expected. Statistical methods exist to provide such an estimate of the time remaining in surgical cases.Surgical facilities should strive to provide in-person progress reports to family members while their relatives are undergoing surgery. To satisfy HIPAA regulations, the staff and physicians who talk to family members in the waiting room will need to determine first if the patient has agreed to the release of information. As hospital information systems are updated

2001 Journal of clinical anesthesia

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