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Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV

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1. Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

to the institution or type of practice. Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection ( ). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care (...) Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus - ACOG Menu ▼ Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Page Navigation ▼ Number 167, October 2016 (Replaces Practice Bulletin 117, December 2010, and Committee Opinion 572, September 2013) (Reaffirmed 2019) Committee on Practice Bulletins—Gynecology. This Practice Bulletin was developed by the American

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2. Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV

Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gynecologic (...) Manifestations of HIV Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Aka: Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV , HIV related Gynecologic Complications II. Associated Conditions: Invasive Cervical Cancer (AIDS defining disease) Progressive enhances HPV replication HPV infection is very common in HIV HPV Implicated in and anal carcinoma Monitor high risk patient with every 6 months Women with <200 III. Associated Conditions: Infectious Vaginitis Occurs in 20-30% HIV infected women if >500 Recurrent in young women suggests HIV

2018 FP Notebook

3. Gynecologic Issues in Children and Adolescent Cancer Patients and Survivors

the ages of 9 and 26 years after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (17). The presence of immunosup- pression, like that experienced in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or organ trans- plantation, is not a contraindication to HPV vaccination. However, theimmuneresponse may be less robust in the immunocompromised patient (18). The three-dose regi- men is recommended for immunosuppressed men and women (19). Surgery Surgical resection of the vagina, uterus, ovaries, or fallopian (...) (15, 16). Human papillomavirus (HPV) related lesions, such as condyloma and cervical dysplasia are frequent in stem cell transplant recipients (13). Therefore, vigilance and routine gynecologic examinations, including the cervix, are recommended. Because these patients are immuno- suppressed, the gynecologist should ask about HPV vac- cinationstatusandencouragevaccination,ifappropriate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends revaccination of HPV vaccine for females between

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection - Infectious Diseases - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS (...) of Tuberculosis (TB) SOCIAL MEDIA Add to Any Platform Loading , MD, MAS, University of California, San Diego Click here for Patient Education NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Topic Resources Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results from 1 of 2 similar retroviruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) that destroy CD4+ lymphocytes and impair cell-mediated immunity, increasing risk of certain infections and cancers. Initial infection may cause nonspecific febrile illness. Risk of subsequent

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

5. Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV

Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gynecologic (...) Manifestations of HIV Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV Aka: Gynecologic Manifestations of HIV , HIV related Gynecologic Complications II. Associated Conditions: Invasive Cervical Cancer (AIDS defining disease) Progressive enhances HPV replication HPV infection is very common in HIV HPV Implicated in and anal carcinoma Monitor high risk patient with every 6 months Women with <200 III. Associated Conditions: Infectious Vaginitis Occurs in 20-30% HIV infected women if >500 Recurrent in young women suggests HIV

2015 FP Notebook

6. British Association for Sexual Health and HIV national guideline for the management of vulvovaginal candidiasis

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV national guideline for the management of vulvovaginal candidiasis British Association for Sexual Health and HIV national guideline for the management of vulvovaginal candidiasis (2019) Guideline Development Group: Cara Saxon (Lead Author), Anne Edwards, Riina Rautemaa- Richardson, Caroline Owen, Bavithra Nathan, Bret Palmer, Clare Wood, Humera Ahmed, Sameena Ahmad, Patient Representatives, Mark FitzGerald (CEG Editor) Clinical Effectiveness Group (...) (CEG), British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) NEW IN THE 2019 GUIDELINES Terminology: • The new guidelines refer to ‘acute’ and ‘recurrent’ vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and no longer use the terms ‘uncomplicated’ and ‘complicated’ VVC; the new definitions are felt to be more reflective of how women with VVC typically present to clinical services and are subsequently managed • The elements of complicated VVC where single dose treatments are not always appropriate are still covered

2019 British Association for Sexual Health and HIV

7. Consolidated guideline on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV

External Review Group FGM female genital mutilation FP family planning FWC WHO Family, Women’s and Children’s Health Cluster GBV gender-based violence GDG Guideline Development Group GER WHO Gender, Equity and Human Rights Team GPS good practice statement GRADE Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation GRC Guidelines Review Committee GVPS Global Values and Preferences Survey HIV human immunodeficiency virus HPV human papillomavirus HRP The UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank (...) (Department of Reproductive Health and Research [RHR]), Rachel Baggaley (Department of HIV/ AIDS), John Beard (Department of Ageing and Life Course [ALC]), Ana Pilar Betrán Lazaga (Department of RHR), Francoise Bigirimana (WHO Regional Office for Africa), Sonja Caffe (WHO Regional Office for the Americas/Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]), Rebekah Bosco Thomas (Gender, Equity and Human Rights T eam), Nathalie Broutet (Department of RHR), T arun Dua (Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

8. Gynecologic Pain (Treatment)

Gynecologic Pain (Treatment) Gynecologic Pain: Overview, Acute Pelvic Pain, Recurrent Pelvic Pain Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjcwNDUwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Gynecologic Pain Updated: May 16 (...) , 2016 Author: G Willy Davila, MD; Chief Editor: Michel E Rivlin, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gynecologic Pain Overview Overview The uterus, cervix, and adnexa share the same visceral innervation as the lower ileum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Signals travel via the sympathetic nerves to spinal cord segments T10 through L1. Because of this shared pathway, distinguishing between pain of gynecologic and gastrointestinal origin is often difficult. [ ] A brief summary

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Gynecologic Pain (Overview)

Gynecologic Pain (Overview) Gynecologic Pain: Overview, Acute Pelvic Pain, Recurrent Pelvic Pain Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjcwNDUwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Gynecologic Pain Updated: May 16 (...) , 2016 Author: G Willy Davila, MD; Chief Editor: Michel E Rivlin, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gynecologic Pain Overview Overview The uterus, cervix, and adnexa share the same visceral innervation as the lower ileum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Signals travel via the sympathetic nerves to spinal cord segments T10 through L1. Because of this shared pathway, distinguishing between pain of gynecologic and gastrointestinal origin is often difficult. [ ] A brief summary

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Gynecologic Pain (Follow-up)

Gynecologic Pain (Follow-up) Gynecologic Pain: Overview, Acute Pelvic Pain, Recurrent Pelvic Pain Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjcwNDUwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Gynecologic Pain Updated: May 16 (...) , 2016 Author: G Willy Davila, MD; Chief Editor: Michel E Rivlin, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gynecologic Pain Overview Overview The uterus, cervix, and adnexa share the same visceral innervation as the lower ileum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Signals travel via the sympathetic nerves to spinal cord segments T10 through L1. Because of this shared pathway, distinguishing between pain of gynecologic and gastrointestinal origin is often difficult. [ ] A brief summary

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Gynecologic Pain (Diagnosis)

Gynecologic Pain (Diagnosis) Gynecologic Pain: Overview, Acute Pelvic Pain, Recurrent Pelvic Pain Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMjcwNDUwLW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Gynecologic Pain Updated: May 16 (...) , 2016 Author: G Willy Davila, MD; Chief Editor: Michel E Rivlin, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gynecologic Pain Overview Overview The uterus, cervix, and adnexa share the same visceral innervation as the lower ileum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Signals travel via the sympathetic nerves to spinal cord segments T10 through L1. Because of this shared pathway, distinguishing between pain of gynecologic and gastrointestinal origin is often difficult. [ ] A brief summary

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Comparative Prevalence of Psychiatric Manifestations in Purely Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome

Comparative Prevalence of Psychiatric Manifestations in Purely Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome Comparative Prevalence of Psychiatric Manifestations in Purely Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparative Prevalence of Psychiatric Manifestations in Purely Obstetrical Antiphospholipid Syndrome (MENT-APL-O) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01649479 Recruitment Status : Terminated (Impossible to include patients at a correct rate

2012 Clinical Trials

13. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA

Hepatocellular carcinoma HCV Hepatitis C virus HIC High-income country HIV Human immunodeficiency virus ICER Incremental cost–effectiveness ratio INH Izoniazid LMIC Low- and middle-income countries LTBI Latent tuberculosis infection MMR Measles, mumps, rubella vaccination MSM Men who have sex with men MTCT Mother-to-child transmission NAT Nucleic acid test NGO Non-governmental organization PCR Polymerase chain reaction PEG-IFN Pegylated interferon PICO Population, intervention, comparison, outcome PMTCT (...) migrants SCIENTIFIC ADVICE iv Figures Figure 1. Annual immigration to the EU/EEA, 2008–2017 6 Figure 2. WHO global map of TB incidence 14 Figure 3. UNAIDS global map of HIV prevalence 23 Figure 3. Estimations of worldwide prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection 28 Figure 4. Prevalence of anti-HCV globally in 2015 33 Figure 5. Distribution of schistosomiasis, worldwide (2012) 39 Figure 6. Countries where schistosomiasis is endemic 42 Figure 7. Countries where strongyloidiasis is endemic 43

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

14. Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain

Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 229 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 229 Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center Portland, OR Investigators: Roger Chou, M.D. Daniel Hartung (...) and mental functioning and reduced quality of life, and is the leading cause of disability in the United States. 1 Chronic pain is caused by a variety of conditions and is influenced by multiple biological, psychological, and social factors. Therefore, optimal approaches to the management of chronic pain should consider psychological and social factors as well as underlying biological mechanisms and physical manifestations of chronic pain (the “biopsychosocial” framework or perspective). 3 Opioids

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

15. Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain

Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 228 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 228 Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center Portland (...) of AHRQ. Therefore, no statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. None of the investigators have any affiliations or financial involvement that conflicts with the material presented in this report. The information in this report is intended to help healthcare decision makers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

16. American College of Rheumatology Guideline for the Management of Reproductive Health in Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Diseases

: use of safe and effective contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancy, pre- pregnancy counseling to encourage conception dur- ing periods of disease quiescence and while receiving pregnancy- compatible medications, and ongoing physician- patient discussion with obstetrics/gynecology collaboration for all reproductive health issues, given the overall low level of available evidence that relates specifically to RMD. Guidelines and recommendations developed and/or endorsed by the American College (...) of reproductive health issues in patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMD) differs from that in healthy persons. As a result, rheumatologists and other clinicians caring for these patients must often discuss with and counsel their patients about contraception, pregnancy and lac- tation (including medications), assisted reproductive technology (ART), fertility preservation, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and they must collaborate with specialists in the fields of obstetrics- gynecology

2020 American College of Rheumatology

17. Lymphogranuloma venereum

Lymphogranuloma venereum Lymphogranuloma venereum - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Lymphogranuloma venereum Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Primary manifestation of infection is painless penile or vulvar inflammation and ulceration at the site of inoculation; often not noticed by patient. Secondary stage typically occurs weeks after development of the primary lesion (...) ; presents as painful, unilateral, inguinal or femoral lymphadenopathy (often referred to as 'inguinal syndrome'). Proctocolitis has emerged as a more typical presentation in men who have sex with men (particularly those who are HIV-positive). Chronic inflammation can lead to scarring and fibrosis causing lymphoedema of the genitals, or formation of strictures and fistulae if anorectal involvement. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis from the swab of a genital ulcer or aspiration of a bubo

2018 BMJ Best Practice

18. Public health service provision by community pharmacies: a systematic map of evidence

search strategy 200 Appendix 4: Coding tool applied to studies included at full text 206 Appendix 5: Systematic reviews screened for primary studies (n=86) 209 Abbreviations Public health service provision by community pharmacies: a systematic map of evidence v Abbreviations EHC Emergency hormonal contraceptives GP General Practice HIV Human immunodeficiency virus HLP Healthy living pharmacy NHS National Health Service OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development PWID People who inject (...) 5.1 Introduction 25 5.2 Included studies 25 5.3 HIV prevention 26 5.4 Chlamydia prevention 28 5.5 Emergency hormonal contraception 31 5.6 Other sexual health services 33 6 Immunisation and travel health 40 6.1 Introduction 40 6.2 Included Studies 40 Public health service provision by community pharmacies: a systematic map of evidence ii 6.3 Influenza 41 6.4 Other immunisation - Shingles (herpes zoster) 44 6.5 Other immunisation - Pneumonia 46 6.6 Other immunisation - Multiple immunisations 47 6.7

2019 EPPI Centre

20. Is the use of chlorhexidine contributing to increased resistance to chlorhexidine and/or antibiotics?

health care settings including acute care, residential aged care, paediatric, neonatal and primary care and rehabilitation as well as the laboratory setting. All forms of use of chlorhexidine in humans and all different exposures (dosage form, duration, stratification of exposure) across different settings. 1. ‘Chlorhexidine Resistance’ (with definition / measures used) to chlorhexidine established. 2. A specific intervention identified as contributing to resistance to Chlorhexidine in a specific (...) Population and setting Intervention Outcome Types of studies Qu. 2 All patients (isolates) / participants (isolates) including children and adults in different health care settings including acute care, residential aged care, paediatric, neonatal and primary care and rehabilitation as well as the laboratory setting All forms of use of chlorhexidine in humans and all different exposures (dosage form, duration, stratification of exposure) across different settings. 1. ‘Resistance against antibiotics

2018 National Health and Medical Research Council

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