How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

342 results for

Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Group B Streptococcal Cellulitis and Necrotizing Fasciitis in Infants: A Systematic Review. (PubMed)

Group B Streptococcal Cellulitis and Necrotizing Fasciitis in Infants: A Systematic Review. There is no consensus regarding approaches to infantile group B streptococcal (GBS) head and neck cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis. We present a case of GBS necrotizing cellulitis and summarize the literature regarding the presentation and management of infantile head and neck GBS cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis.The literature was searched using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Medline (...) (inception to April 2017) by 2 independent review authors. Inclusion criteria encompassed case reports or case series of infants less than 12 months of age with GBS cellulitis of the head and neck or with GBS necrotizing fasciitis without restriction to the head and neck. Data were extracted using tables developed a priori by 2 independent review authors, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus.An infant presenting at 33 days of age with GBS facial necrotizing fasciitis was successfully treated

2018 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

2. Group C streptococcal cellulitis, looking deeper than the skin (PubMed)

Group C streptococcal cellulitis, looking deeper than the skin 30238045 2019 02 26 2352-5126 4 8 2018 Sep JAAD case reports JAAD Case Rep Group C streptococcal cellulitis, looking deeper than the skin. 818-821 10.1016/j.jdcr.2018.04.008 Khosravi Hasan H Department of Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Hou Amy A Department of Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Colgrove Robert C RC Division of Infectious Diseases, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge (...) United States JAAD Case Rep 101665210 2352-5126 ALT, alanine aminotransferase AST, aspartate aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein ED, emergency department GCS, group C Streptococcus Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis cellulitis group C streptococci rhabdomyolysis 2018 9 22 6 0 2018 9 22 6 0 2018 9 22 6 1 epublish 30238045 10.1016/j.jdcr.2018.04.008 S2352-5126(18)30108-5 PMC6143700 Rev Infect Dis. 1991 Mar-Apr;13(2):270-80 2041960 BMC Genomics. 2011 Jan 11;12:17

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 JAAD Case Reports

3. Group B streptococcal infection

, but infections are most common in the neonatal period, in older people, and in adults with predisposing factors (i.e., pregnancy, diabetes, immunocompromised). GBS can cause a range of infections including sepsis, cellulitis, pneumonia, and meningitis. This monograph deals with confirmed group B streptococcal infection only. History and exam presence of risk factors fever symptoms of meningitis signs of meningitis symptoms of sepsis signs of sepsis symptoms of pneumonia signs of pneumonia symptoms of UTI (...) Group B streptococcal infection Group B streptococcal infection - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Group B streptococcal infection Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Most common cause of early, severe infection in newborns. Also a cause of infection in pregnancy, people with diabetes, immunocompromised people, and older adults. Presentation depends on the age of the patient

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for Group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection in patients with acute sore throat in primary care?

What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for Group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection in patients with acute sore throat in primary care? Evidence note | 1 Evidence Note Number 83 August 2018 In response to enquiries from NHS Borders and the Medicines Management Partnership What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for Group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection in patients with acute sore throat in primary care? What (...) detection tests (RADTs) for presence of Group A Streptococcal (GAS) bacteria were comparable across reviews, at around 85% and 95%, respectively. There was substantial heterogeneity around sensitivity. ? A systematic review identified three non-UK cluster randomised controlled trials (RCTs) conducted between 2005 and 2008 and reported that the use of RADTs reduces rates of antibiotic prescribing for acute pharyngitis when compared with usual care. There was some evidence of antibiotic prescribing

2018 Evidence Notes from Healthcare Improvement Scotland

5. Management of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Disease

Management of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Disease Management of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Disease | From the American Academy of Pediatrics | Pediatrics '); document.write(''); } function OAS_AD(pos) { if (OAS_version >= 11 && typeof(OAS_RICH)!='undefined') { OAS_RICH(pos); } else { OAS_NORMAL(pos); } } //--> Search for this keyword Source User menu Sections Sign up for highlighting editor-chosen studies with the greatest impact on clinical care. Management (...) of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Disease Karen M. Puopolo , Ruth Lynfield , James J. Cummings , COMMITTEE ON FETUS AND NEWBORN , COMMITTEE ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES This article has a correction. Please see: Abstract Group B streptococcal (GBS) infection remains the most common cause of neonatal early-onset sepsis and a significant cause of late-onset sepsis among young infants. Administration of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis is the only currently available effective strategy

2019 American Academy of Pediatrics

6. Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis

Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Non-Group (...) A Streptococcal Cellulitis Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Aka: Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis , Non-Group A Streptococcus Cellulitis , Non-Group A Strep Cellulitis From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology caused by Non-Group A Beta Hemolytic III. Predisposing Conditions Bypass with saphenous vein graft extends along saphenous venectomy course Often recurrent episodes Associated with and often allows portal of entry Radical pelvic surgery, radiation or Pelvic node cancer Involves vulva, inguinal

2018 FP Notebook

7. Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis

Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Group (...) A Streptococcal Cellulitis Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Aka: Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis , Group A Streptococcus Cellulitis , Erysipelas , Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Cellulitis , Group A Strep Cellulitis , Saint Anthony's Fire , Streptococcus Pyogenes Cellulitis , Facial erysipelas From Related Chapters II. History: St. Anthony's Fire Refers to epidemic gangrene of the 11th century Patients presented with bright red extremities Initially attributed to fungus ingestion and Now believed those

2018 FP Notebook

8. Increasing Rates of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease in Alberta, Canada; 2003–2017 (PubMed)

Increasing Rates of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease in Alberta, Canada; 2003–2017 We present an analysis of increasing rates of invasive group A streptococci (iGAS) over a 15-year period in Alberta, Canada.From 2003 to 2017, the emm type of iGAS isolates was identified from patients with iGAS disease in Alberta. Demographic, clinical, and risk factor data were collected.A total of 3551 cases of iGAS were identified in Alberta by isolation of a GAS isolate from a sterile site. The age (...) -standardized incidence rates of iGAS increased from 4.24/100 000 in 2003 to 10.24 in 2017. Rates (SD) were highest in those age <1 (9.69) years and 60+ (11.15) years; 57.79% of the cases were male. Commonly identified risk factors included diabetes, hepatitis C, nonsurgical wounds, addiction, alcohol abuse, drug use, and homelessness. The overall age-standardized case fatality rate was 5.11%. The most common clinical presentation was septicemia/bacteremia (41.84%), followed by cellulitis (17.25%). The top

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Open forum infectious diseases

9. High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northwestern Ontario, Canada (PubMed)

High Incidence of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northwestern Ontario, Canada Worldwide, indigenous populations appear to be at increased risk for invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS) infections. Although there is empirical evidence that the burden of iGAS disease is significant among remote First Nations communities in Northwestern Ontario, Canada, the epidemiology of iGAS infections in the area remains poorly characterized.Individuals that met (...) were identified, for an annualized incidence of 56.2 per 100 000. Primary bacteremia was present in 26.2% of cases, and cellulitis was identified in 55.4% of cases. The most common comorbidities identified were diabetes (38.5%) and skin conditions (38.5%). Prevalent risk factors included alcohol dependence (25%). Fourteen different emm types were identified among 42 isolates, with the most common being emm114 (17.4%), emm11 (15.2%), and emm118 (13.0%). Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Open forum infectious diseases

10. Etiology of Cellulitis and Clinical Prediction of Streptococcal Disease: A Prospective Study (PubMed)

Etiology of Cellulitis and Clinical Prediction of Streptococcal Disease: A Prospective Study Background.  The importance of bacteria other than group A streptococci (GAS) in different clinical presentations of cellulitis is unclear, commonly leading to treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of this study was to describe the etiological and clinical spectrum of cellulitis and identify clinical features predicting streptococcal etiology. Methods.  We prospectively enrolled 216 (...) patients hospitalized with cellulitis. Clinical details were registered. Bacterial culture was performed from blood, cutaneous or subcutaneous tissue, and/or swabs from skin lesions. Paired serum samples were analyzed for anti-streptolysin O and anti-deoxyribonuclease B antibodies. Results.  Serology or blood or tissue culture confirmed β-hemolytic streptococcal (BHS) etiology in 72% (146 of 203) of cases. An additional 13% (27 of 203) of cases had probable BHS infection, indicated by penicillin

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Open forum infectious diseases

11. Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. (PubMed)

Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. Orbital cellulitis is extremely uncommon following strabismus surgery. When it occurs, the infection has been reported to present from day 1 to within 1 week following surgery and has the potential for significant morbidity. We report the case of a 6.5-year-old boy presenting with unilateral orbital cellulitis growing group A Streptococcus pyogenes on postoperative day 1, after uncomplicated bilateral medial rectus (...) recessions. The patient had two contacts with streptococcal pharyngitis at the time of surgery but was completely asymptomatic himself. We hypothesize that these contacts may have led to the rapid onset of his orbital cellulitis.Copyright © 2019 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2019 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

12. Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis

Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Non-Group (...) A Streptococcal Cellulitis Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Aka: Non-Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis , Non-Group A Streptococcus Cellulitis , Non-Group A Strep Cellulitis From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology caused by Non-Group A Beta Hemolytic III. Predisposing Conditions Bypass with saphenous vein graft extends along saphenous venectomy course Often recurrent episodes Associated with and often allows portal of entry Radical pelvic surgery, radiation or Pelvic node cancer Involves vulva, inguinal

2015 FP Notebook

13. Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis

Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Group (...) A Streptococcal Cellulitis Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis Aka: Group A Streptococcal Cellulitis , Group A Streptococcus Cellulitis , Erysipelas , Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Cellulitis , Group A Strep Cellulitis , Saint Anthony's Fire , Streptococcus Pyogenes Cellulitis , Facial erysipelas From Related Chapters II. History: St. Anthony's Fire Refers to epidemic gangrene of the 11th century Patients presented with bright red extremities Initially attributed to fungus ingestion and Now believed those

2015 FP Notebook

14. Primary Care Corner with Geoffrey Modest MD: Cellulitis treatment

that resolved. — 36 patients had treatment failure with cephalexin plus TMP-SMX: 10 (28%) were found to have an abscess the time of clinical failure and 9 (25%) developed an opening of the skin and purulent drainage — 60 patients overall had treatment failure with clinical evidence of infection and had material available for culture: 41 (68%, and 10% of the per-protocol population) had MRSA, 8 (13%) had MSSA, and 3% streptococcal species, with no difference between treatment groups in the proportion having (...) MRSA during follow-up. — Post hoc subgroup analyses showed no difference between the groups if the patients had a history of fever or not, had diabetes, or by the size of the erythema. Commentary: — cellulitis is a common outpatient issue, and a difficult one because it is usually impossible to find the causative organism. b-hemolytic strep is often considered the cause, and the 2014 guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America suggest choosing an antibiotic against Streptococci

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine blog

15. Erysipelas or cellulitis with a prosthetic joint in situ (PubMed)

Erysipelas or cellulitis with a prosthetic joint in situ We describe a case of a 60-year old male who developed an acute prosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the knee, secondary to erysipelas of the lower leg due to beta-hemolytic Group G streptococci. As it is unknown how often this phenomenon occurs in patients with prosthetic implants and which patients are most prone to develop this complication, we analyzed: i) the incidence of the development of a PJI in these patients and ii) the clinical (...) characteristics of streptococcal PJI during an episode of erysipelas/cellulitis. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients with a prosthetic implant in situ presenting at the emergency department with erysipelas/cellulitis, 1 out of 10 patients developed a PJI. An additional analysis within a multicenter cohort on streptococcal PJI demonstrated in 22 patients that a secondary PJI due to erysipelas/cellulitis mostly develops in young implants (<5 years old). In 20 cases (91%), the skin infection

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of Bone and Joint Infection

16. Streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome due to Streptococcus dysgalactiaesubspecies equisimilis in breast cancer-related lymphedema: a case report (PubMed)

Streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome due to Streptococcus dysgalactiaesubspecies equisimilis in breast cancer-related lymphedema: a case report Breast cancer-related lymphedema often causes cellulitis and is one of the most common complications after breast cancer surgery. Streptococci are the major pathogens underlying such cellulitis. Among the streptococci, the importance of the Lancefield groups C and G is underappreciated; most cases involve Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (...) . Despite having a relatively weak toxicity compared with group A streptococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis is associated with a mortality rate that is as high as that of group A streptococci in cases of invasive infection because Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis mainly affects elderly individuals who already have various comorbidities.An 83-year-old Japanese woman with breast cancer-related lymphedema in her left upper limb was referred to our hospital with high

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Journal of medical case reports

17. Effectiveness of clindamycin and intravenous immunoglobulin, and risk of disease in contacts, in invasive group a streptococcal infections. (PubMed)

Effectiveness of clindamycin and intravenous immunoglobulin, and risk of disease in contacts, in invasive group a streptococcal infections. The use of clindamycin and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in treatment of invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS) infection, and the need for prophylactic antibiotics in close contacts, remains contentious. Controlled trials are unlikely to be conducted, so prospective, observational studies provide the best data to inform practice.We conducted population (...) -based, prospective, active surveillance of iGAS infections throughout the state of Victoria, Australia (population 4.9 million), from March 2002 through August 2004.Eighty-four cases of severe iGAS infection (streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, septic shock, or GAS cellulitis with shock) were identified. Clindamycin-treated patients had more severe disease than clindamycin-untreated patients but lower mortality (15% vs 39%; odds ratio [OR], 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Clinical Infectious Diseases

18. Cellulitis

. Causes: General Common (most Cellulitis cases) Staphylococcal Cellulitis (typically with abscess) ( ) Less common Streptococcal infections Pneumococcus Group C or G Cellulitis Cellulitis in newborns Rapidly progressive Cellulitis See ( ) multocida V. Causes: Exposure See See See Fish Handlers or water exposure (See ) Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae ( , fish handler's disease) (Fish tank exposure) Spines of stonefish (South Pacific) risk of serious systemic toxicity, pulmonary edema ( , high risk (...) Cellulitis , Streptococcal Cellulitis From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Accounts for 2% of all Emergency Department visits III. Risk factors See Also see ( ) Post-operative infection at incision site Underlying skin lesion or ( infection) related lesions bypass with saphenous vein graft Radical pelvic surgery or radiation Neoplasms Lymphatic Cutaneous metastases from neoplasms Inflammatory Carcinoma es Extremity Stasis or Chronic (may progress rapidly) (in children) See Immunocompromised patients IV

2018 FP Notebook

19. Streptococcal Infection, Group A (Overview)

. Streptococcus group A infections. Necrotizing fasciitis of the left hand in a patient who had severe pain in the affected area. Streptococcus group A infections. Patient who had had necrotizing fasciitis of the left hand and severe pain in the affected area (from Image 8). This photo was taken at a later date, and the wound is healing. The patient required skin grafting. Streptococcus group A infections. Gangrenous streptococcal cellulitis in a patient with diabetes. Erythema secondary to group (...) A streptococcal cellulitis. Invasive soft tissue infection due to Streptococcus pyogenes. This child developed fever and soft-tissue swelling on the fifth day of a varicella-zoster infection. Leading edge aspirate of cellulitis grew S pyogenes. Although the patient responded to intravenous penicillin and clindamycin, operative débridement was necessary because of clinical suspicion of early necrotizing fasciitis. Streptococcus group A infections. Necrotizing fasciitis rapidly progresses from erythema

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

20. Streptococcal Infection, Group A (Follow-up)

of the left hand in a patient who had severe pain in the affected area. Streptococcus group A infections. Patient who had had necrotizing fasciitis of the left hand and severe pain in the affected area (from Image 8). This photo was taken at a later date, and the wound is healing. The patient required skin grafting. Streptococcus group A infections. Gangrenous streptococcal cellulitis in a patient with diabetes. Erythema secondary to group A streptococcal cellulitis. Invasive soft tissue infection due (...) Streptococcal Infection, Group A (Follow-up) Group A Streptococcal (GAS) Infections Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Pharmacologic Therapy, Monitoring Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>