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Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

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1. Characteristics, Associated Diseases, and Management of Gram-negative Toe-web Infection: A French Experience. (PubMed)

Characteristics, Associated Diseases, and Management of Gram-negative Toe-web Infection: A French Experience. Gram-negative toe-web infection can cause pain and disability, be complicated by a long healing time, management failure, and cellulitis, and recur due to persistent predisposing factors. To describe the clinical features and management of Gram-negative toe-web infection and evaluate predisposing factors and associated diseases, their management, and the effect of controlling them (...) on the rate of recurrence, we conducted a retrospective real-life study of patients with Gram-negative toe-web infection. Among the 62 patients (sex ratio 9:1), 31 experienced more than one episode of Gram-negative toe-web infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most prominent bacteria. Predisposing factors/associated diseases were eczema (66%), suspected Tinea pedis (58%), humidity (42%), hyperhidrosis (16%), psoriasis (11%), and vascular disorders (40%). Patients in whom associated diseases

2019 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

2. Gram-negative bacterial toe web infection - a systematic review. (PubMed)

Gram-negative bacterial toe web infection - a systematic review. Gram-negative bacterial toe web infection (GNBTWI) is a frequent therapeutic challenge in clinical practice with high recurrence rates and frequent need of systemic drugs. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an updated overview and evidence-based data on pathogens, risk factors and treatment of GNBTWI along with promoting a consistent international terminology. This systematic review is based on a search in PubMed (...) database for English and German articles published between 1980 and 2016. A total of seven articles were considered appropriate for inclusion in this review regarding to treatment and outcome. Throughout the medical literature, a variety of terms for bacterial toe web infections is used. Only few data on the incidence of GNBTWI were published. GNBTWI has been shown to have a significant male predominance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified organism beside a high mixed infection rate

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2017 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV

3. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram-Negative Toe Web (...) Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Aka: Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection , Tinea Pedis Superinfection , Interdigital Intertrigo Secondary Infection , Bacterial Intertrigo of Toe Webspace From Related Chapters II. Causes infections (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (part of mixed-infection) Group A Beta Hemolytic saprophyticus III. Risk Factors IV. Symptoms Burning in toe webspace V. Signs Initially mild erythema Later, marked erythema, maceration, odor Pustular discharge from site VI

2018 FP Notebook

4. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Diagnosis)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Diagnosis) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Gram-Negative (...) Toe Web Infection Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Overview Background Gram-negative interweb foot is a relatively common and troubling disorder. [ ] The infection is commonly associated with the use of closed-toe or tight-fitting shoes and in individuals in whom strong physical exertion plays an important role in athletic, occupational, or recreational

2014 eMedicine.com

5. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Treatment)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Treatment) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi10cmVhdG1lbnQ (...) = processing > Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment Medical Care In a 1972 study describing gram-negative toe infection, the authors found no single or simple therapeutic agent to be regularly effective as a quick cure. Patients with positive fungal culture results were treated with bedrest and supportive

2014 eMedicine.com

6. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Overview)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Overview) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Gram-Negative (...) Toe Web Infection Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Overview Background Gram-negative interweb foot is a relatively common and troubling disorder. [ ] The infection is commonly associated with the use of closed-toe or tight-fitting shoes and in individuals in whom strong physical exertion plays an important role in athletic, occupational, or recreational

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Follow-up)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Follow-up) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi10cmVhdG1lbnQ (...) = processing > Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment Medical Care In a 1972 study describing gram-negative toe infection, the authors found no single or simple therapeutic agent to be regularly effective as a quick cure. Patients with positive fungal culture results were treated with bedrest and supportive

2014 eMedicine.com

8. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram-Negative Toe Web (...) Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Aka: Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection , Tinea Pedis Superinfection , Interdigital Intertrigo Secondary Infection , Bacterial Intertrigo of Toe Webspace From Related Chapters II. Causes infections (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (part of mixed-infection) Group A Beta Hemolytic saprophyticus III. Risk Factors IV. Symptoms Burning in toe webspace V. Signs Initially mild erythema Later, marked erythema, maceration, odor Pustular discharge from site VI

2015 FP Notebook

9. Gram-Negative Folliculitis (Diagnosis)

of bacterial flora carried in the nasal passages. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between the presence of gram-positive organisms and gram-negative organisms in the pharyngeal, axillary, and toe-web flora. In patients with acne who are treated with oral antibiotics, the number of Staphylococcus aureus organisms and diphtheroids decreases and the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterobacterial organisms increases in the nose. Usually, gram-negative bacteria constitute less than (...) Folliculitis Updated: Mar 29, 2018 Author: Mordechai M Tarlow, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Folliculitis Overview Background Gram-negative folliculitis, first described by Fulton et al in 1968, [ ] is an infection caused by gram-negative organisms. The infection may occur as a complication in patients with and and usually develops in patients who have received systemic antibiotics for prolonged periods. [ ] Gram-negative folliculitis

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Gram-Negative Folliculitis (Overview)

of bacterial flora carried in the nasal passages. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between the presence of gram-positive organisms and gram-negative organisms in the pharyngeal, axillary, and toe-web flora. In patients with acne who are treated with oral antibiotics, the number of Staphylococcus aureus organisms and diphtheroids decreases and the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterobacterial organisms increases in the nose. Usually, gram-negative bacteria constitute less than (...) Folliculitis Updated: Mar 29, 2018 Author: Mordechai M Tarlow, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Folliculitis Overview Background Gram-negative folliculitis, first described by Fulton et al in 1968, [ ] is an infection caused by gram-negative organisms. The infection may occur as a complication in patients with and and usually develops in patients who have received systemic antibiotics for prolonged periods. [ ] Gram-negative folliculitis

2014 eMedicine.com

11. CRACKCast E137 – Skin Infections

to venous insufficiency Obesity Immunosuppression (such as diabetes, steroids or HIV infection) Breaks in the skin between the toes (“toe web intertrigo”); these may be clinically inapparent Preexisting skin infection (such as tinea pedis, impetigo, varicella) Lymphatic compromise may occur following surgical procedures (such as saphenous venectomy or lymph node dissection) or in the setting of congenital abnormalities. Skin’s broken; skin’s weak; body’s broken; body’s weak. [2] List 6 differential (...) and hypotension. The diagnosis is made on the basis of the clinical presentation. [14] How are Staph. Toxic shock and Strep. Toxic shock managed? What is the mortality rate? Patient with STREP – TSS need surgical debridement of the necrotizing infection! In patients with STAPH – TSS they need the source of the infection addressed (ie FB) Treatment: Resuscitation and interventions above Clindamycin and vancomycin Add gram negative coverage if the patient is in shock ?role for IVIG in staph. TSS Recent INCTINCT

2017 CandiEM

12. Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

infections following clean operations on the trunk, head and neck, or extremities that also have systemic signs of infection (strong, low). A first-generation cephalosporin or an antistaphylococcal penicillin for MSSA, or vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin, telavancin, or ceftaroline where risk factors for MRSA are high (nasal colonization, prior MRSA infection, recent hospitalization, recent antibiotics), is recommended (strong, low). See also Tables and . Agents active against gram-negative bacteria (...) : C & S, culture and sensitivity; I & D, incision and drainage; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ; MSSA, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus ; Rx, treatment; TMP/SMX, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Figure 2. Algorithm for the management and treatment of surgical site infections (SSIs). *For patients with type 1 (anaphylaxis or hives) allergy to β-lactam antibiotics. If Gram stain not available, open and debride if purulent drainage present. Where the rate of infection

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2014 Infectious Diseases Society of America

13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetic Foot Infections

or metabolic perturbations). This classification system, along with a vascular assessment, helps determine which patients should be hospitalized, which may require special imaging procedures or surgical interventions, and which will require amputation. Most DFIs are polymicrobial, with aerobic gram-positive cocci (GPC), and especially staphylococci, the most common causative organisms. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli are frequently copathogens in infections that are chronic or follow antibiotic treatment (...) or in combinations, can cause DFI, but gram-positive cocci (GPC), especially staphylococci, are the most common. Although clinically uninfected wounds do not require antibiotic therapy, infected wounds do. Empiric antibiotic regimens must be based on available clinical and epidemiologic data, but definitive therapy should be based on cultures of infected tissue. Imaging is especially helpful when seeking evidence of underlying osteomyelitis, which is often difficult to diagnose and treat. Surgical interventions

2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America

14. Fungal skin infection - foot

Fungal skin infection - foot Fungal skin infection - foot - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Fungal skin infection - foot: Summary Fungal infection of the foot is also known as 'athlete's foot' or 'tinea pedis', and it describes superficial skin infection of the feet and toes, predominantly caused by dermatophytes. Different sub-types include: Interdigital — most common; affects the lateral toe web spaces first; usually caused by Trichophyton rubrum. Moccasin or dry — diffuse chronic (...) the CKS topic on for more information. Plantar keratosis — localized callus on the sole of the foot, typically over pressure areas such as metatarsal heads. This may mimic infection. Pitted keratolysis — a superficial and sometimes malodorous infection of the pressure-bearing areas of the soles of the feet, characterized by crateriform pitting which may coalesce to form irregular erosions; may be associated with hyperhidrosis. Gram-negative bacterial infection, cellulitis, or impetigo — may cause

2014 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (Diagnosis)

and other streptococcal species. Uncommon causes include C pneumoniae, Neisseria species, anaerobes, and gram-negative rods. Nosocomial sinusitis often involves pathogens that colonize the upper respiratory tract and migrate into the sinuses. Prolonged endotracheal intubation places patients at increased risk for nosocomial sinusitis. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is less common than sensitive staphylococci. [ ] Gram-negative bacilli (eg, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) are other (...) for up to 80% of croup cases. PIV type 1 is the leading cause of croup in children. [ ] Other viruses include influenza viruses and RSV. Uncommon causes include hMPV, adenovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus (including coxsackievirus and enteric cytopathic human orphan [ECHO] viruses), and measles virus. Approximately 95% of all cases of whooping cough are caused by the gram-negative rod Bordetella pertussis . The remaining cases result from B parapertussis . Other forms of laryngitis

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (Overview)

and other streptococcal species. Uncommon causes include C pneumoniae, Neisseria species, anaerobes, and gram-negative rods. Nosocomial sinusitis often involves pathogens that colonize the upper respiratory tract and migrate into the sinuses. Prolonged endotracheal intubation places patients at increased risk for nosocomial sinusitis. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is less common than sensitive staphylococci. [ ] Gram-negative bacilli (eg, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) are other (...) for up to 80% of croup cases. PIV type 1 is the leading cause of croup in children. [ ] Other viruses include influenza viruses and RSV. Uncommon causes include hMPV, adenovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus (including coxsackievirus and enteric cytopathic human orphan [ECHO] viruses), and measles virus. Approximately 95% of all cases of whooping cough are caused by the gram-negative rod Bordetella pertussis . The remaining cases result from B parapertussis . Other forms of laryngitis

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Association of HPV 7 with warts in toe webs. (PubMed)

Association of HPV 7 with warts in toe webs. There have been no studies on the prevalence of types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cutaneous warts that focus on warts in toe webs (WTW). There is no documented association between HPV 7 and WTW.To explore the clinical and histopathological features of WTW, and the distribution of HPV genotypes in patients with WTW.The study group consisted of 20 patients with WTW; 31 patients with typical verruca vulgaris (VV) were enrolled as the disease (...) granules and a pronounced hyperkeratosis with parakeratosis. TA cloning showed that the sequence shared 90% or more homology with the HPV genotype in direct sequencing. No HPV 7 DNA was found in the scales taken from toe webs without warts.This is the first study evaluating the prevalence of HPV types in WTW and the first report of the association between HPV 7 and specific subgroups of patients with warts.

2009 British Journal of Dermatology

18. Spondyloarthritis in over 16s: diagnosis and management

infection). 1.1.4 Be aware that axial spondyloarthritis: affects a similar number of women as men can occur in people who are human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) negative may be present despite no evidence of sacroiliitis on a plain film X-ray. Referr Referral for suspected axial spondyloarthritis al for suspected axial spondyloarthritis 1.1.5 If a person has low back pain that started before the age of 45 years and has lasted for longer than 3 months, refer the person to a rheumatologist (...) , enthesitis and dactylitis) or extra-articular (for example, uveitis and psoriasis [including psoriatic nail symptoms]). Risk factors include recent genitourinary infection and a family history of spondyloarthritis or psoriasis. 1.1.3 Be aware that axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis may be missed, even if the onset is associated with established comorbidities (for example, uveitis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease [Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis], or a gastrointestinal or genitourinary

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

19. Guidelines on Diabetes, Pre-Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases developed in collaboration with the EASD

25 Table 10 Patient characteristics of cardiovascular safety studies with glucose-lowering agents 30 Table 11 Heart failure phenotypes 37 Table 12 Assessment of the risk of amputation: the Wound, Ischaemia, and foot Infection classification 43 Table 13 Chronic kidney disease classification by estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria . 45 List of figures Figure 1 Hazard ratios for vascular outcomes in people with vs. without diabetes mellitus at baseline, based on analyses of 530 083 (...) −Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 53 SBP Systolic blood pressure SE Stress echocardiography SGLT2 Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 SIMA Single internal mammary artery SUSTAIN-6 Trial to Evaluate Cardiovascular and Other Long-term Outcomes with Semaglutide in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes SYNTAX Synergy between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery T1DM Type 1 diabetes mellitus T2DM Type 2 diabetes mellitus TBI Toe–brachial index TECOS Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes

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2019 European Society of Cardiology

20. Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

resistance RA Right atrium/atrial RCT Randomized controlled trial RIETE Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Thromboembolica venosa RR Relative risk rtPA Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator RV Right ventricle/ventricular SaO 2 Arterial oxygen saturation SPECT Single-photon emission computed tomography sPESI Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index SURVET Sulodexide in Secondary Prevention of Recurrent Deep Vein Thrombosis study TAPSE Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion TOE (...) on formulation) In vitro fertilization Oral contraceptive therapy Post-partum period Infection (specifically pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and HIV) Inflammatory bowel disease Cancer (highest risk in metastatic disease) Paralytic stroke Superficial vein thrombosis Thrombophilia Weak risk factors (OR < 2) Bed rest >3 days Diabetes mellitus Arterial hypertension Immobility due to sitting (e.g. prolonged car or air travel) Increasing age Laparoscopic surgery (e.g. cholecystectomy) Obesity Pregnancy

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2019 European Society of Cardiology

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