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Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

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1. Characteristics, Associated Diseases, and Management of Gram-negative Toe-web Infection: A French Experience. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Characteristics, Associated Diseases, and Management of Gram-negative Toe-web Infection: A French Experience. Gram-negative toe-web infection can cause pain and disability, be complicated by a long healing time, management failure, and cellulitis, and recur due to persistent predisposing factors. To describe the clinical features and management of Gram-negative toe-web infection and evaluate predisposing factors and associated diseases, their management, and the effect of controlling them (...) on the rate of recurrence, we conducted a retrospective real-life study of patients with Gram-negative toe-web infection. Among the 62 patients (sex ratio 9:1), 31 experienced more than one episode of Gram-negative toe-web infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most prominent bacteria. Predisposing factors/associated diseases were eczema (66%), suspected Tinea pedis (58%), humidity (42%), hyperhidrosis (16%), psoriasis (11%), and vascular disorders (40%). Patients in whom associated diseases

2019 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

2. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram-Negative Toe Web (...) Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Aka: Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection , Tinea Pedis Superinfection , Interdigital Intertrigo Secondary Infection , Bacterial Intertrigo of Toe Webspace From Related Chapters II. Causes infections (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (part of mixed-infection) Group A Beta Hemolytic saprophyticus III. Risk Factors IV. Symptoms Burning in toe webspace V. Signs Initially mild erythema Later, marked erythema, maceration, odor Pustular discharge from site VI

2018 FP Notebook

3. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Treatment)

LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection) and Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Infectious Disease Physicians Recommended 2002 1830144-overview Procedures Procedures 2001 /viewarticle/893736 Journal Article Journal Article 2001 /viewarticle/879429 Journal Article (...) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Treatment) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi10cmVhdG1lbnQ

2014 eMedicine.com

4. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Overview)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Overview) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Gram-Negative (...) Toe Web Infection Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Overview Background Gram-negative interweb foot is a relatively common and troubling disorder. [ ] The infection is commonly associated with the use of closed-toe or tight-fitting shoes and in individuals in whom strong physical exertion plays an important role in athletic, occupational, or recreational

2014 eMedicine.com

5. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Follow-up)

LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties. Close encoded search term (Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection) and Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection What to Read Next on Medscape Related Conditions and Diseases Medscape Consult News & Perspective Tools Slideshow Most Popular Articles According to Infectious Disease Physicians Recommended 2002 1830144-overview Procedures Procedures 2001 /viewarticle/893736 Journal Article Journal Article 2001 /viewarticle/879429 Journal Article (...) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Follow-up) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi10cmVhdG1lbnQ

2014 eMedicine.com

6. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Diagnosis)

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection (Diagnosis) Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA1NTMwNi1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Gram-Negative (...) Toe Web Infection Updated: Apr 23, 2018 Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Overview Background Gram-negative interweb foot is a relatively common and troubling disorder. [ ] The infection is commonly associated with the use of closed-toe or tight-fitting shoes and in individuals in whom strong physical exertion plays an important role in athletic, occupational, or recreational

2014 eMedicine.com

7. Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection

Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram-Negative Toe Web (...) Infection Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection Aka: Gram-Negative Toe Web Infection , Tinea Pedis Superinfection , Interdigital Intertrigo Secondary Infection , Bacterial Intertrigo of Toe Webspace From Related Chapters II. Causes infections (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (part of mixed-infection) Group A Beta Hemolytic saprophyticus III. Risk Factors IV. Symptoms Burning in toe webspace V. Signs Initially mild erythema Later, marked erythema, maceration, odor Pustular discharge from site VI

2015 FP Notebook

8. CRACKCast E137 – Skin Infections

to venous insufficiency Obesity Immunosuppression (such as diabetes, steroids or HIV infection) Breaks in the skin between the toes (“toe web intertrigo”); these may be clinically inapparent Preexisting skin infection (such as tinea pedis, impetigo, varicella) Lymphatic compromise may occur following surgical procedures (such as saphenous venectomy or lymph node dissection) or in the setting of congenital abnormalities. Skin’s broken; skin’s weak; body’s broken; body’s weak. [2] List 6 differential (...) and hypotension. The diagnosis is made on the basis of the clinical presentation. [14] How are Staph. Toxic shock and Strep. Toxic shock managed? What is the mortality rate? Patient with STREP – TSS need surgical debridement of the necrotizing infection! In patients with STAPH – TSS they need the source of the infection addressed (ie FB) Treatment: Resuscitation and interventions above Clindamycin and vancomycin Add gram negative coverage if the patient is in shock ?role for IVIG in staph. TSS Recent INCTINCT

2017 CandiEM

9. Fungal skin infection - foot

Fungal skin infection - foot Fungal skin infection - foot - NICE CKS Share Fungal skin infection - foot: Summary Fungal infection of the foot is also known as 'athlete's foot' or 'tinea pedis', and it describes superficial skin infection of the feet and toes, predominantly caused by dermatophytes. Different sub-types include: Interdigital — most common; affects the lateral toe web spaces first; usually caused by Trichophyton rubrum. Moccasin or dry — diffuse chronic scaling and hyperkeratosis (...) callus on the sole of the foot, typically over pressure areas such as metatarsal heads. This may mimic infection. Pitted keratolysis — a superficial and sometimes malodorous infection of the pressure-bearing areas of the soles of the feet, characterized by crateriform pitting which may coalesce to form irregular erosions; may be associated with hyperhidrosis. Gram-negative bacterial infection, cellulitis, or impetigo — may cause interdigital erythema, scaling, and maceration. See the CKS topics

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Gram-Negative Folliculitis (Overview)

of bacterial flora carried in the nasal passages. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between the presence of gram-positive organisms and gram-negative organisms in the pharyngeal, axillary, and toe-web flora. In patients with acne who are treated with oral antibiotics, the number of Staphylococcus aureus organisms and diphtheroids decreases and the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterobacterial organisms increases in the nose. Usually, gram-negative bacteria constitute less than (...) Folliculitis Updated: Mar 29, 2018 Author: Mordechai M Tarlow, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Folliculitis Overview Background Gram-negative folliculitis, first described by Fulton et al in 1968, [ ] is an infection caused by gram-negative organisms. The infection may occur as a complication in patients with and and usually develops in patients who have received systemic antibiotics for prolonged periods. [ ] Gram-negative folliculitis

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Gram-Negative Folliculitis (Diagnosis)

of bacterial flora carried in the nasal passages. An inverse relationship has been demonstrated between the presence of gram-positive organisms and gram-negative organisms in the pharyngeal, axillary, and toe-web flora. In patients with acne who are treated with oral antibiotics, the number of Staphylococcus aureus organisms and diphtheroids decreases and the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterobacterial organisms increases in the nose. Usually, gram-negative bacteria constitute less than (...) Folliculitis Updated: Mar 29, 2018 Author: Mordechai M Tarlow, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Gram-Negative Folliculitis Overview Background Gram-negative folliculitis, first described by Fulton et al in 1968, [ ] is an infection caused by gram-negative organisms. The infection may occur as a complication in patients with and and usually develops in patients who have received systemic antibiotics for prolonged periods. [ ] Gram-negative folliculitis

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetic Foot Infections Full Text available with Trip Pro

or metabolic perturbations). This classification system, along with a vascular assessment, helps determine which patients should be hospitalized, which may require special imaging procedures or surgical interventions, and which will require amputation. Most DFIs are polymicrobial, with aerobic gram-positive cocci (GPC), and especially staphylococci, the most common causative organisms. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli are frequently copathogens in infections that are chronic or follow antibiotic treatment (...) peripheral neuropathy; more than half had PAD; and nearly half had evidence of osteomyelitis. In the year prior to hospitalization, 40% had a history of an infected foot ulcer (perhaps implying inadequate outpatient care); most infections involved the toes (45%) or forefoot (34%) and were of moderate severity (by Infectious Diseases Society of America [IDSA] criteria). Clinicians performed cultures on 86% of patients (usually by swabbing the wound) and initiated antibiotic therapy for all patients (half

2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America

13. Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (Diagnosis)

and other streptococcal species. Uncommon causes include C pneumoniae, Neisseria species, anaerobes, and gram-negative rods. Nosocomial sinusitis often involves pathogens that colonize the upper respiratory tract and migrate into the sinuses. Prolonged endotracheal intubation places patients at increased risk for nosocomial sinusitis. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is less common than sensitive staphylococci. [ ] Gram-negative bacilli (eg, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) are other (...) for up to 80% of croup cases. PIV type 1 is the leading cause of croup in children. [ ] Other viruses include influenza viruses and RSV. Uncommon causes include hMPV, adenovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus (including coxsackievirus and enteric cytopathic human orphan [ECHO] viruses), and measles virus. Approximately 95% of all cases of whooping cough are caused by the gram-negative rod Bordetella pertussis . The remaining cases result from B parapertussis . Other forms of laryngitis

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (Overview)

and other streptococcal species. Uncommon causes include C pneumoniae, Neisseria species, anaerobes, and gram-negative rods. Nosocomial sinusitis often involves pathogens that colonize the upper respiratory tract and migrate into the sinuses. Prolonged endotracheal intubation places patients at increased risk for nosocomial sinusitis. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) is less common than sensitive staphylococci. [ ] Gram-negative bacilli (eg, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ) are other (...) for up to 80% of croup cases. PIV type 1 is the leading cause of croup in children. [ ] Other viruses include influenza viruses and RSV. Uncommon causes include hMPV, adenovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus (including coxsackievirus and enteric cytopathic human orphan [ECHO] viruses), and measles virus. Approximately 95% of all cases of whooping cough are caused by the gram-negative rod Bordetella pertussis . The remaining cases result from B parapertussis . Other forms of laryngitis

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Prevention and Control of Methecillin-Resistant Staphylcoccus Aureus (MRSA)

nursing staff helps reduce patient-to-patient spread of the microorganism within the hospital (27). Healthcare associated infections are a serious patient safety issue and staff must adhere to good infection control practices in particular hand hygiene. The patient is no longer considered infectious after three negative screens but while in hospital such patients should continue to be screened at weekly intervals as MRSA may recur, especially if the patient is exposed to the selective pressures (...) contact with blood and/or body fluids. Gloves are used to prevent contamination of healthcare personnel hands when anticipating direct contact with blood or body fluids, mucous membranes, non-intact skin and other potentially infectious material (37). Having direct contact with patients who are colonised or infected with pathogens transmitted by the contact route e.g. MRSA or handling or touching visibly or potentially contaminated patient care equipment and environmental surfaces is a significant

2019 National Clinical Guidelines (Ireland)

16. Management of Diabetic Foot

(Second Edition) smaller number demonstrating efficacy against gram-negative bacteria (e.g. neomycin, silver sulphadiazine). Some antibiotics that are used systemically (e.g. gentamicin, metronidazole, clindamycin) have also been formulated for topical use. 47, level I In a Cochrane systematic review, topical antimicrobial dressing was more effective than non-antimicrobial dressing in wound healing of diabetic foot (RR=1.28, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.45). However, there was no significant difference in adverse (...) for a revision including the scope of the revised CPG. A multidisciplinary team will be formed and the latest systematic review methodology used by MaHTAS will be employed. Every care is taken to ensure that this publication is correct in every detail at the time of publication. However, in the event of errors or omissions, corrections will be published in the web version of this document, which is the definitive version at all times. This version can be found on the websites mentioned above.Management

2018 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

17. Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Appendix I: Pressure Injury Assessment Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Appendix J: Progression from Bacterial Balance to Bacterial Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Appendix K: Assessment for Infection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Appendix L: Swabbing (...) medical status using a valid and reliable pressure injury risk assessment tool. V ? Recommendation 1.3: Assess the person’s pressure injury using the same valid and reliable wound assessment tool on initial examination and whenever there is a signi? cant change in the pressure injury. V ? Recommendation 1.4: Assess the person’s pressure injury for signs and symptoms of infection (super? cial critical colonization/localized infection and/or deep and surrounding infection/systemic infection) using

2016 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

18. Dalbavancin hydrochloride (HCl) (Dalvance)

currently breastfeeding an infant. 3. Patients with sustained shock, defined as systolic blood pressure 8 µg/mL). 7. Patients with evidence of meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis, gas gangrene, gangrene, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis; endovascular infection, such as clinical and/or echocardiographic evidence of endocarditis or septic thrombophlebitis. 8. Infections caused exclusively by Gram-negative bacteria (without Gram-positive bacteria present) and infections caused by fungi, whether alone (...) catheter, or a neurosurgical device such as a ventricular peritoneal shunt, intracranial pressure monitor, or epidural catheter. 12.Gram-negative bacteremia, even in the presence of Gram-positive infection or Gram-positive bacteremia. Note: If a Gram-negative bacteremia developed during the study, or was subsequently found to have been present at Baseline, the patient was removed from study treatment and received appropriate antibiotic(s) to treat the Gram-negative bacteremia. Such patients were

2013 FDA - Drug Approval Package

19. Assessment and Management of Foot Ulcers for People with Diabetes, Second Edition

and depth of wound bed . Ia – IV ? 1 . 2 Assess bed of foot ulcer(s) for exudate, odour, condition of peri-ulcer skin and pain . IV ? 1 . 3 Assess affected limb(s) for vascular supply and facilitate appropriate diagnostic testing, as indicated . III – IV ? 1 . 4 Assess foot ulcer(s) for infection G using clinical assessment techniques, based on signs and symptoms, and facilitate appropriate diagnostic testing, if indicated . Ia ? 1 . 5 Assess affected limb(s) for sensory, autonomic and motor changes (...) and the interprofessional team to establish mutually agreed upon goals to improve quality G of life if factors affecting poor healing have been addressed and complete wound closure is unlikely . IV ? Implementation 3 . 0 Implement a plan of care to mitigate risk factors that can influence wound healing . IV ? 3 . 1 Provide wound care consisting of debridement, infection control and moisture balance where appropriate . Ia – IV ? 3 . 2 Redistribute pressure applied to foot ulcer(s) by the use of offloading devices . Ia

2013 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

20. Supportive care in multiple myeloma

is crucial in preventing and managing infection in myeloma. Streptococcus pneumoniae , Haemophilus influenzae and Gram negative bacilli are the most frequent causes of infection in myeloma patients ( ). Prophylactic antibiotics may have a role in reducing infection rates but have the potential for leading to increased Clostridium difficile infection and antibiotic resistance. The role of prophylactic antibiotics in myeloma needs to be addressed in larger numbers of multiple myeloma patients (...) with the effects of the disease. It is given equal priority alongside diagnosis and treatment’. This definition is sufficiently broad to cover not only to cover symptomatic treatment and palliative care but also the wide range of management options considered to be ‘haematological supportive care’, including anti‐infectives, transfusion therapy, anticoagulation and growth factors. Although much of the supportive care can be provided by the haematologists and their teams principally responsible for the care

2011 British Committee for Standards in Haematology

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