How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

38 results for

Gram negative HACEK Bacilli

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Risk factors and outcomes of endocarditis due to non-HACEK Gram-negative bacilli: data from the prospective multicenter SEI cohort. (PubMed)

Risk factors and outcomes of endocarditis due to non-HACEK Gram-negative bacilli: data from the prospective multicenter SEI cohort. The objective of this study was to investigate predisposing factors and outcomes of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by non-HACEK Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in a contemporary multicenter cohort. Patients with IE due to GNB, prospectively observed in 26 Italian centers from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed. Using a case-control design, each case was compared to three

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

2. Gram negative HACEK Bacilli

Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram negative HACEK Bacilli (...) Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Aka: Gram negative HACEK Bacilli , HACEK From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Causative organisms of III. Types species Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cardiobacterium hominis Eikenella corrodens Kingella kingae Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Gram negative HACEK Bacilli." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies

2018 FP Notebook

3. Gram negative HACEK Bacilli

Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gram negative HACEK Bacilli (...) Gram negative HACEK Bacilli Aka: Gram negative HACEK Bacilli , HACEK From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Causative organisms of III. Types species Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cardiobacterium hominis Eikenella corrodens Kingella kingae Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Gram negative HACEK Bacilli." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies

2015 FP Notebook

4. HACEK Group Infections (Treatment)

larger than 1 cm in diameter; (3) increase in size of vegetations after 1 month of therapy; (4) periannular extension of infection; and (5) valvular dysfunction, perforation, or rupture. [ ] Ineffective antimicrobial therapy (usually not the case with HACEK organisms) Resection of mycotic aneurysms Most cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by more resistant organisms (eg, methicillin-resistant S aureus [MRSA], vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE], enteric gram-negative bacilli) Local (...) . If the patient is stable, has good social support, and is afebrile with negative blood cultures, outpatient therapy can then be offered for the remainder of the treatment course. Previous References Geraci JE, Wilson WR. Symposium on infective endocarditis. III. Endocarditis due to gram-negative bacteria. Report of 56 cases. Mayo Clin Proc . 1982 Mar. 57 (3):145-8. . Chambers et al. HACEK infective endocarditis: characteristics and outcomes from a large, multi-national cohort. PLoS One . 2013. 8 (5):e63181

2014 eMedicine.com

5. HACEK Group Infections (Follow-up)

larger than 1 cm in diameter; (3) increase in size of vegetations after 1 month of therapy; (4) periannular extension of infection; and (5) valvular dysfunction, perforation, or rupture. [ ] Ineffective antimicrobial therapy (usually not the case with HACEK organisms) Resection of mycotic aneurysms Most cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by more resistant organisms (eg, methicillin-resistant S aureus [MRSA], vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE], enteric gram-negative bacilli) Local (...) . If the patient is stable, has good social support, and is afebrile with negative blood cultures, outpatient therapy can then be offered for the remainder of the treatment course. Previous References Geraci JE, Wilson WR. Symposium on infective endocarditis. III. Endocarditis due to gram-negative bacteria. Report of 56 cases. Mayo Clin Proc . 1982 Mar. 57 (3):145-8. . Chambers et al. HACEK infective endocarditis: characteristics and outcomes from a large, multi-national cohort. PLoS One . 2013. 8 (5):e63181

2014 eMedicine.com

6. HACEK Infections

includes weakly virulent, gram-negative organisms that primarily cause endocarditis. The HACEK group of nonmotile, gram-negative bacilli or coccobacilli contains a number of minimally pathogenic, slow-growing, fastidious genera. Their primary pathology is in susceptible people; about 5% of endocarditis cases are due to this group, making them the most common causes of gram-negative bacilli endocarditis. The group consists of Haemophilus sp ( H. parainfluenza , H. aphrophilus , and H. paraphrophilus (...) HACEK Infections HACEK Infections - Infectious Diseases - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge Smallpox Because of worldwide vaccination

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

7. A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2018 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society for Microbiology

, acid-fast bacilli; ASAP, as soon as possible; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; IFA, indirect fluorescent antibody; IgG, immunoglobulin G; IgM, immunoglobulin M; NAAT, nucleic acid amplification test; RT, room temperature. a HACEK bacteria include Haemophilus (Aggregatibacter) aphrophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus ) actinomycetemcomitans , Cardiobacterium hominis , Eikenella corrodens , and Kingella kingae. b Typically, blood specimens are split (...) directly into AFB-specific blood culture bottle Inoculated culture vials should be transported to the laboratory ASAP for early incubation. Abbreviations: AFB, acid-fast bacilli; ASAP, as soon as possible; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; IFA, indirect fluorescent antibody; IgG, immunoglobulin G; IgM, immunoglobulin M; NAAT, nucleic acid amplification test; RT, room temperature. a HACEK bacteria include Haemophilus (Aggregatibacter) aphrophilus , Haemophilus parainfluenzae , Aggregatibacter

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Infectious Diseases Society of America

8. CRACKCast E083 – Infective Endocarditis and Valvular Disease

IV catheters, immunosuppression, recent dental/surg. Procedure 2) List 5 common bacteria responsible for infective endocarditis Most common microorganisms (Table 83-1): Staphylococcus aureus (30%) Viridans – 18% enterococci – 10% Coag-negative staph. – 10% Bovis Other strep. non-HACEK gram negative bacteria Fungi (candida, aspergillus) HACEK haemophilus, actinobacillus, cardiobacterium, eikenella, kingella Polymicrobial Culture negative – 8% 3) Give three examples of immunologic sequelae (...) These are rare <5-10%. They are fastidious gram -ve bacilli They occur in people with native valves, who DO NOT use IV drugs Historically hard to culture (>6 days needed, and thought to be the etiology in culture-negative IE), but now with automated blood culturing machines they can be cultured in 5 days or so. Susceptible to ceftriaxone 3)What are buzz-bizz features of all four valve diseases? Mitral stenosis Rheumatic heart disease – keep them SLOW and FULL Mitral regurg: Sudden fulminant pulmonary edema

2017 CandiEM

9. Antibacterial-coated sutures versus non-antibacterial-coated sutures for the prevention of abdominal, superficial and deep, surgical site infection (SSI)

%), Escherichia coli (9.4%) and Enterococcus faecalis (5.9%) [91]. Antimicrobial-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), vancomycin- resistant Enterococcus, gram-negative bacilli or Candida albicans, are recognized as a major problem, since they are causing an ever increasing proportion of SSIs [42,92]. Outbreaks or clusters of SSIs have also been caused by unusual pathogens, such as Rhizopus oryzae, Clostridium perfringens, Rhodococcus bronchialis, Nocardia farcinica, Legionella (...) ), but may include faecal flora (e.g., anaerobic bacteria and gram-negative aerobes) when incisions are made near the perineum or groin. If a gastrointestinal organ is opened during an operation and it becomes the source of pathogens, gram-negative bacilli (e.g., E. coli), gram-positive microorganisms (e.g., enterococci) and sometimes anaerobes (e.g., Bacillus fragilis) are found in the typical SSI isolates [42]. Infection caused by microorganisms from an outside source following surgery is less common

2017 EUnetHTA

10. Prevention, Diagnosis & Management of infective endocarditis

Enterococcus species 88 4.2.2.5 HACEK microorganisms 91 4.2.2.6 Candida 92 4.2.2.7 Non-HACEK Gram-negative microorganisms 93 4.2.2.8 Other microorganisms 94 4.2.3 Empirical therapy 95 4.2.4 Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for infective endocarditis 99 5.0 SURGICAL INTERVENTION 100 5.1 Indications 100 5.2 Timing of surgery 102 5.2.1 Preventing systemic embolism 103 5.3 Sur gery in specific conditions 104 5.3.1 Cerebral infarction or haemorrhage 104 5.3.2 Right-sided endocarditis 105 5.3.3 (...) microorganisms if it is community acquired NVE or late PVE. Consider additional cover for MSSA in patients with acute presentation or with additional risk factors such as intravenous drug use (IVDU) and patients with prosthesis. If it is healthcare associated NVE or early PVE, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), enterococci and non-HACEK Gram-negative microorganisms should be covered (refer Section 4.2 and Figure 4a). • Patients with IE should be closely monitored for response to treatment

2017 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

11. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications

, and Gram-negative bacilli ; in animal models of experimental IE , ; and clinically. High inocula are also more likely to have antibiotic-resistant subpopulations that can emerge in the setting of antibiotic therapy. For example, in an in vitro PD model, the activity of vancomycin against heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S aureus (hVISA) and non-hVISA isolates was reduced in the presence of a high inoculum amount (10 8 colony-forming units per milliliter). Bactericidal Drugs Data from animal models (...) : glomerulonephritis, Osler nodes, Roth spots, and rheumatoid factor Microbiological evidence: positive blood culture but does not meet a major criterion as noted above (excludes single positive cultures for coagulase-negative staphylococci and organisms that do not cause endocarditis) or serological evidence of active infection with organism consistent with IE Echocardiographic minor criteria eliminated HACEK indicates Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America

12. Vascular Graft Infections, Mycotic Aneurysms, and Endovascular Infections: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

microorganism from cultures of wound drainage from purulent material or fluid from ultrasound-guided aspiration, antimicrobial therapy usually is empiric and should be directed against staphylococci and gram-negative bacilli. Figure 5. Antimicrobial therapy for extracavitary VGI. IV indicates intravenous; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; PO, oral; and VGI, vascular graft infection. If a specific microorganism is identified, therapy should be adjusted accordingly. Antimicrobial therapy can (...) for at least two thirds of VGIs. , Infections caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci are more common than those caused by S aureus . Among S aureus infections, methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) infections are increasing in frequency. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is now the most common cause of gram-negative infections and accounts for at least 10% of VGIs , ( ). Figure 1. Microbiology of prosthetic vascular graft infections. ICD indicates implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; and PPM, permanent

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 American Heart Association

13. Guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment of Infective Endocarditis

of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), European Heart Journal , Volume 36, Issue 44, 21 November 2015, Pages 3075–3128, Download citation file: © 2019 Oxford University Press Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Abbreviations and acronyms 3D three-dimensional AIDS acquired immune deficiency syndrome b.i.d. bis in die (twice daily) BCNIE blood culture-negative infective endocarditis CDRIE cardiac device-related infective endocarditis CHD (...) congenital heart disease CIED cardiac implantable electronic device CoNS coagulase-negative staphylococci CPG Committee for Practice Guidelines CRP C-reactive protein CT computed tomography E. Enterococcus ESC European Society of Cardiology ESR erythrocyte sedimentation rate EuroSCORE European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation FDG fluorodeoxyglucose HF heart failure HIV human immunodeficiency virus HLAR high-level aminoglycoside resistance i.m. intramuscular i.v. intravenous ICE International

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 European Society of Cardiology

14. Infective Endocarditis in Childhood: 2015 Update

are implanted at the time of surgery, and infection manifests within 60 days after cardiac surgery, but coagulase-negative staphylococci infection may present as late as ≥1 years after surgery. Among newborn infants, S aureus , coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Candida species are the most common causes of IE. , Less frequently, group B Streptococcus , enteric Gram-negative rod species, and S pneumoniae cause IE in this population. Although catheter-related bacteremias caused by Gram-negative bacilli (...) occur relatively frequently in pediatric patients in intensive care units, IE rarely is caused by these organisms. The rarity of IE caused by Gram-negative bacilli likely is attributable to poor adhesion of Gram-negative bacilli to cardiac valves. Pediatric patients who inject drugs intravenously are at risk for IE, especially caused by S aureus. Fungal endocarditis in children usually is caused by Candida species, especially C albicans , although Aspergillus endocarditis also occurs. With the use

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 American Heart Association

15. Infective Endocarditis in Adults: Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Therapy, and Management of Complications

, and Gram-negative bacilli ; in animal models of experimental IE , ; and clinically. High inocula are also more likely to have antibiotic-resistant subpopulations that can emerge in the setting of antibiotic therapy. For example, in an in vitro PD model, the activity of vancomycin against heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S aureus (hVISA) and non-hVISA isolates was reduced in the presence of a high inoculum amount (10 8 colony-forming units per milliliter). Bactericidal Drugs Data from animal models (...) : glomerulonephritis, Osler nodes, Roth spots, and rheumatoid factor Microbiological evidence: positive blood culture but does not meet a major criterion as noted above (excludes single positive cultures for coagulase-negative staphylococci and organisms that do not cause endocarditis) or serological evidence of active infection with organism consistent with IE Echocardiographic minor criteria eliminated HACEK indicates Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens

2015 American Heart Association

16. Detection of the Most Common Microorganism of Infective Endocarditis in Assiut University Hospital

staphylococci , Streptococcus bovis , other streptococci , gram-negative bacteria, HACEK organisms in this category include a number of fastidious gram-negative bacilli: Haemophilus aphrophilus(subsequently called Aggregatibacter aphrophilus and Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus); Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (subsequently called Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans); Cardiobacterium hominis; Eikenella corrodens; and Kingella kingae , and fungi (1,2). A variable proportion of IE remain blood culture (...) - negative (1-4). Most clinically significant bacteremias are detected within 48 hours; common and fastidious pathogens (such as members of the HACEK group) may be detected within five days of incubation with modern automated blood culture detection systems. The optimal volume of blood for each blood culture in adults is 20 ml. Zoonotic agents, such as Coxiella burnetii, Brucella spp., and Bartonella spp. were frequently detected in North Africa and identified as causes of infective endocarditis (IE

2018 Clinical Trials

17. A case of Klebsiella oxytoca endocarditis in an intravenous drug user (PubMed)

A case of Klebsiella oxytoca endocarditis in an intravenous drug user Non-HACEK Gram-negative bacilli account for only a small percentage of infective endocarditis cases globally. Among those, Klebsiella species account for only about 10% of cases and are most often health-care acquired. We present a rare case of Klebsiella oxytoca endocarditis in a young intravenous drug user.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 IDCases

18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Surgery

. d For procedures in which pathogens other than staphylococci and streptococci are likely, an additional agent with activity against those pathogens could be considered. For example, if there are surveillance data showing that gram-negative organisms are a cause of surgical-site infections (SSIs) for the procedure, practitioners may consider combining clindamycin or vancomycin with another agent (cefazolin if the patient is not β-lactam allergic; aztreonam, gentamicin, or single-dose (...) , a mechanical bowel preparation combined with oral neomycin sulfate plus oral erythromycin base or with oral neomycin sulfate plus oral metronidazole should be given in addition to i.v. prophylaxis. n Where there is increasing resistance to first- and second-generation cephalosporins among gram-negative isolates from SSIs, a single dose of ceftriaxone plus metronidazole may be preferred over the routine use of carbapenems. o The necessity of continuing topical antimicrobials postoperatively has not been

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2013 Infectious Diseases Society of America

19. Guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment of Infective Endocarditis

organisms such as nutritionally variant streptococci, fastidious Gram-negative bacilli of the HACEK group (Haemophilus parain?uenzae, H. aphrophilus, H. paraphrophilus, H. in?uenzae, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomi- tans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae, and K. denitri?cans), Brucella, and fungi. 4. Infective endocarditis associated with constantly negative blood cultures They are caused by intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii, Bartonella, Chlamydia (...) streptococci (groups A, B, C, and G) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2384 Nutritionally variant streptococci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2384 Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2386 Methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant staphylococci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2387 Enterococcus spp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2387 Gram-negative bacteria

2009 European Society of Cardiology

20. Sepsis, Bacterial (Follow-up)

[MSSA] or methicillin-resistant S aureus [MRSA]) ,but gram-negative bacilli can be involved. The preferred empiric therapy for these infections is meropenem or cefepime (for Pseudomonas ) plus additional coverage for staphylococci. [ , ] If MRSA is prevalent in the institution, add linezolid, vancomycin, or daptomycin. Otherwise, nafcillin, oxacillin, or cefazolin provides adequate coverage for MSSA. Unless coagulase-negative, methicillin-sensitive staphylococci are recovered from the blood (...) imipenem, meropenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, or piperacillin-tazobactam. Cephalosporins or quinolones in combination with metronidazole are alternate first-line agents for the treatment of biliary tract infections. Empiric therapy for intra-abdominal and pelvic infections The main pathogens in the lower abdomen and pelvis include aerobic coliform gram-negative bacilli and B fragilis . Enterococci do not require special coverage unless the patient has recurrent infection or enterococci have been

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>