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Glomerulonephritis Causes

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161. Glomerulonephritis, Acute (Follow-up)

processing > Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Updated: Apr 08, 2016 Author: Bonnie Jean Brown, DO; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Overview Overview Acute glomerulonephritis requires prompt diagnosis, as it can rapidly progress to permanent kidney disease if left undiagnosed. Glomerulonephritis is the third most common cause of end-stage renal disease, following diabetes mellitus (...) and hypertension, [ ] and is responsible for about 15% of cases of end-stage renal disease. [ ] The emergency physician must consider acute glomerulonephritis in the differential diagnosis for patients that present with hypertension, hematuria, proteinuria, peripheral edema, and/or acute pulmonary edema. Acute glomerulonephritis is defined as inflammation and subsequent damage of the glomeruli leading to hematuria, proteinuria, and azotemia; it may be caused by primary renal disease or systemic conditions

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

162. Glomerulonephritis, Acute (Treatment)

processing > Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Updated: Apr 08, 2016 Author: Bonnie Jean Brown, DO; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Overview Overview Acute glomerulonephritis requires prompt diagnosis, as it can rapidly progress to permanent kidney disease if left undiagnosed. Glomerulonephritis is the third most common cause of end-stage renal disease, following diabetes mellitus (...) and hypertension, [ ] and is responsible for about 15% of cases of end-stage renal disease. [ ] The emergency physician must consider acute glomerulonephritis in the differential diagnosis for patients that present with hypertension, hematuria, proteinuria, peripheral edema, and/or acute pulmonary edema. Acute glomerulonephritis is defined as inflammation and subsequent damage of the glomeruli leading to hematuria, proteinuria, and azotemia; it may be caused by primary renal disease or systemic conditions

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

163. Acute Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis (Diagnosis)

of open access article, "The Role of Nephritis-Associated Plasmin Receptor (NAPlr) in Glomerulonephritis Associated with Streptococcal Infection." Oda T, Yoshizawa N, Yamakami K, et al. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, 2012; doi: 10.1155/417675. Acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN) results from an antecedent infection of the skin (impetigo) or throat (pharyngitis) caused by nephritogenic strains of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. [ , , , ] The concept of nephritogenic (...) % of children with acute sporadic poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. The prognosis for persons with acute glomerulonephritis secondary to other causes is less certain. Edema usually resolves within 5-10 days, and the blood pressure usually returns to normal after 2-3 weeks, even though persistence of elevated pressures for as many as 6 weeks is compatible with complete resolution. Urinary abnormalities resolve at various times after onset. Proteinuria may disappear within the first 2-3 months or may

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

164. Glomerulonephritis, Acute (Diagnosis)

processing > Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Updated: Apr 08, 2016 Author: Bonnie Jean Brown, DO; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Overview Overview Acute glomerulonephritis requires prompt diagnosis, as it can rapidly progress to permanent kidney disease if left undiagnosed. Glomerulonephritis is the third most common cause of end-stage renal disease, following diabetes mellitus (...) and hypertension, [ ] and is responsible for about 15% of cases of end-stage renal disease. [ ] The emergency physician must consider acute glomerulonephritis in the differential diagnosis for patients that present with hypertension, hematuria, proteinuria, peripheral edema, and/or acute pulmonary edema. Acute glomerulonephritis is defined as inflammation and subsequent damage of the glomeruli leading to hematuria, proteinuria, and azotemia; it may be caused by primary renal disease or systemic conditions

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

165. Glomerulonephritis, Acute (Overview)

processing > Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Updated: Apr 08, 2016 Author: Bonnie Jean Brown, DO; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Emergent Management of Acute Glomerulonephritis Overview Overview Acute glomerulonephritis requires prompt diagnosis, as it can rapidly progress to permanent kidney disease if left undiagnosed. Glomerulonephritis is the third most common cause of end-stage renal disease, following diabetes mellitus (...) and hypertension, [ ] and is responsible for about 15% of cases of end-stage renal disease. [ ] The emergency physician must consider acute glomerulonephritis in the differential diagnosis for patients that present with hypertension, hematuria, proteinuria, peripheral edema, and/or acute pulmonary edema. Acute glomerulonephritis is defined as inflammation and subsequent damage of the glomeruli leading to hematuria, proteinuria, and azotemia; it may be caused by primary renal disease or systemic conditions

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

166. Idiopathic or iatrogenic membranous glomerulonephritis? A case of spironolactone-induced membranous glomerulonephritis (PubMed)

Idiopathic or iatrogenic membranous glomerulonephritis? A case of spironolactone-induced membranous glomerulonephritis Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults in the UK. In most cases, the aetiology remains unknown, although recent data suggested a clear mechanism of pathogenesis. In approximately a quarter of cases, however, a presumed cause is found, such as systemic lupus nephritis, malignancy, hepatitis B and various drugs. Here, we present

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2011 NDT Plus

167. Pathology of Podocytopathies Causing Nephrotic Syndrome in Children (PubMed)

Pathology of Podocytopathies Causing Nephrotic Syndrome in Children Nephrotic syndrome (NS) in children includes a diverse group of diseases that range from genetic diseases without any immunological defects to causes that are primarily due to immunological effects. Recent advances in molecular and genomic studies have resulted in a plethora of genetic defects that have been localized to the podocyte, the basic structure that is instrumental in normal filtration process. Although the disease (...) can manifest from birth and into adulthood, the primary focus of this review would be to describe the novel genes and pathology of primary podocyte defects that cause NS in children. This review will restrict itself to the pathology of congenital NS, minimal change disease (MCD), and its variants and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The two major types of congenital NS are Finnish type characterized by dilated sausage shaped tubules morphologically and diffuse mesangial sclerosis

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2016 Frontiers in pediatrics

168. Acute Kidney Injury Causes

) Diaphoresis (e.g. , major upper gastrointestinal ) Extracellular fluid volume sequestration Muscle crush injury Systemic vasodilation (e.g. , ) Inadequate Severe Intra-Renal striction See (e.g. s, ARBs, S) Cardiorenal syndrome III. Causes: Intrinsic Renal Failure - Vascular Injury Afferent arteriolar striction Results in decreased driving force Decreased Glomerular filtration Causes (Microvascular and Macrovascular) (TTP) (HUS) IV. Causes: Intrinsic Renal Failure - Glomerulonephritis See Associated (...) Acute Kidney Injury Causes Acute Kidney Injury Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Acute Kidney Injury Causes Acute

2018 FP Notebook

169. Devastating renal outcome caused by skin infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A case report. (PubMed)

Devastating renal outcome caused by skin infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A case report. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging pathogen that infects the skin and soft tissue. However, there are few reports of renal complications from MRSA involving immunoglobulin (Ig)A-dominated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Favorable renal outcomes from IgA GN are achieved by administering timely therapy. In the present study, we describe

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2016 Medicine

170. Validation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis as the primary cause of renal failure in the United States Renal Data Systems. (PubMed)

had SLE by record only. Among the 97 SLE patients, the attributed causes of ESRD in the USRDS were 77 SLE and 12 with other causes (unspecified glomerulonephritis, hypertension, scleroderma), and 8 missing. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for SLE in the USRDS were 79%, 99.9%, 93%, and 99.7%, respectively. Of the 60 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, 44 (73%) had SLE as primary ESRD cause in the USRDS. Attribution of the primary ESRD causes among SLE patients with ACR/SLICC (...) Validation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis as the primary cause of renal failure in the United States Renal Data Systems. Using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification as gold standards, we determined sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of having SLE denoted as the primary cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD

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2016 Arthritis care & research

171. Dual pathology as a cause of proteinuria in the post-transplant period; report of a case (PubMed)

Dual pathology as a cause of proteinuria in the post-transplant period; report of a case Proteinuria is common after renal transplantation and affects between 35%-45% of patients during the same year as their transplant. We report a case of dual pathology in the renal allograft as a cause of severe proteinuria. A 38-year-old male presented with end-stage renal disease. He underwent live related renal allograft transplant. His immediate post-transplant period was unremarkable. He developed rise (...) in serum creatinine (2.1 mg/dl) 6 months after transplant and was biopsied. He was diagnosed as a case of acute cellular rejection type Ib with suspicion for antibody mediated rejection. He was treated with methylprednisolone to which he showed a good response with return of serum creatinine to 1.6 mg/dl. Subsequently, he developed a nephrotic range proteinuria 6 months after this episode of rejection. Repeat biopsy was performed. He was diagnosed as a case of immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis

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2015 Journal of nephropharmacology

172. Attribution of cause of end-stage renal disease among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: the Georgia Lupus Registry (PubMed)

to ESRD, 78.9% had SLE as their attributed cause of ESRD. Of the remaining 53 patients, 43.4%, 18.9% and 15.6% had ESRD attributed to hypertension, diabetes mellitus type II and non-SLE-related glomerulonephritis, respectively. Attribution of ESRD to SLE was higher among patients aged ≤30 (87.9-93.9%) vs >30 (52.6%; p<0.001) but did not differ by sex or race. Having Medicaid (86.2%) or no insurance (93.5%) was associated with greater attribution of ESRD to SLE than having private insurance (72.5%; p (...) Attribution of cause of end-stage renal disease among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: the Georgia Lupus Registry Whether using provider-attributed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cause of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in national surveillance data captures the entire population of patients with SLE and ESRD remains uncertain. Our goal was to examine attributed cause of ESRD in US surveillance data among patients with SLE who have developed ESRD.Data from a national registry

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2016 Lupus science & medicine

173. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis. (PubMed)

cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting (...) Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis. Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma

2013 Mayo Clinic Proceedings

174. Bartonella Endocarditis-Associated Glomerulonephritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. (PubMed)

are a known and relatively common cause of culture-negative endocarditis and have been associated with the development of endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis. We present a case of Bartonella endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis in which recognition of a characteristic immunofluorescent pattern and thorough investigation of the clinical history led to this uncommon diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (...) Bartonella Endocarditis-Associated Glomerulonephritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. Infectious endocarditis is associated with a number of systemic manifestations, including kidney disease. Kidney manifestations, including hematuria, parenchymal infarction, and glomerulonephritis, may affect as many as 40%-50% of patients with infective endocarditis. In a minority of cases of infective endocarditis, routine bacterial cultures do not yield an offending organism. Bartonella species

2013 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

175. Etiology-Based Diagnostic Approach to Proliferative Glomerulonephritis. (PubMed)

Etiology-Based Diagnostic Approach to Proliferative Glomerulonephritis. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) often is classified based on the pattern of injury. The pattern of injury does not reveal the underlying cause. New insights into the causes of proliferative GN suggest that determining the type of deposits is more likely to provide clues to the underlying cause than determining the pattern of injury. This article proposes a new classification of proliferative GN that links findings (...) from both immunofluorescence and light microscopy. The basis of the classification is whether the proliferative GN is immune complex mediated, pauci-immune, or complement mediated; the type of immunoglobulin deposits and complement factors then determine or suggest the underlying cause. One of the aims of the proposed classification system is to focus on the pathophysiology of the GN with emphasis on the underlying cause, leading to appropriate evaluation and management. The second aim

2013 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

176. [Clinical efficacy and safety of sequential treatment with alprostadil and beraprost sodium for chronic renal failure induced by chronic glomerulonephritis]. (PubMed)

[Clinical efficacy and safety of sequential treatment with alprostadil and beraprost sodium for chronic renal failure induced by chronic glomerulonephritis]. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of sequential treatment with alprostadil and beraprost sodium for chronic renal failure caused by chronic glomerulonephritis.Sixty-three patients with chronic renal failure due to chronic glomerulonephritis, after receiving a 2-week-long conventional treatment, were randomly divided (...) sodium can improve the glomerular filtration rate and decrease urine albumin excretion rate, serum creatinine increase rate, and lower blood fibrinogen and D-dimer levels, thus delaying the progression of chronic renal failure caused by chronic glomerulonephritis. This therapy shows a dose-related effect with good clinical safety.

2013 Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University

177. Effect of add-on pentoxifylline on proteinuria in membranous glomerulonephritis: a 6-month placebo-controlled trial. (PubMed)

Effect of add-on pentoxifylline on proteinuria in membranous glomerulonephritis: a 6-month placebo-controlled trial. Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) may cause proteinuria as the main complication and is a strong risk factor for end-stage renal disease. Current therapeutic regimens provide only partial renoprotection. Data derived from both animal and human studies provide a scientific basis for the use of pentoxifylline as an antiproteinuric agent.This study was designed to evaluate

2013 Clinical drug investigation

178. Recurrent HIV-Associated Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis With Lupus-like Features After Kidney Transplantation. (PubMed)

glomerulonephritis with histologic features identical to lupus nephritis in the absence of clinical or serologic markers of lupus, is well recognized as a cause of end-stage renal disease in HIV-infected patients. None of the HIV-associated kidney lesions, whether classic HIVAN or non-HIVAN, has been reported to recur in kidney transplants. We report here for the first time clinical and histologic recurrence of HIV-associated lupus-like nephritis after successful kidney transplantation, causing proteinuria (...) Recurrent HIV-Associated Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis With Lupus-like Features After Kidney Transplantation. A spectrum of kidney diseases besides classic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) exists in HIV-infected patients. Immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis has emerged as a significant contributor to the burden of kidney disease in this population, particularly in patients of non-African descent. Lupus-like nephritis, a form of immune complex

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2013 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

179. Proliferative Glomerulonephritis With Monoclonal Immunoglobulin Deposits in a Kidney Allograft. (PubMed)

Proliferative Glomerulonephritis With Monoclonal Immunoglobulin Deposits in a Kidney Allograft. Paraprotein may accumulate in glomeruli and cause kidney damage associated with variable histopathologic patterns and a characteristic immunofluorescence staining restricted to a single light chain and/or a single heavy chain isotype. Hence, such glomerular injury includes diseases caused by deposition of a monoclonal light chain, heavy chain, or entire immunoglobulin (light and heavy chains), which (...) may manifest as proliferative glomerulonephritis. In this report, we focus on the latter as the least characterized of the 3, particularly in the transplantation setting. We describe a case of late transplant dysfunction associated with glomerular immunoglobulin G1/κ deposits. We also present our experience with proliferative glomerulonephritis and monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits in transplant and native kidney biopsies, with reference to the literature. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney

2013 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

180. Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis: The Role for Laser Microdissection and Mass Spectrometry. (PubMed)

Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis: The Role for Laser Microdissection and Mass Spectrometry. Monoclonal gammopathy is increasingly recognized as a common cause of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN); however, establishing this diagnosis can be challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old asymptomatic woman who presented with proteinuria with protein excretion of 5,000mg/d, microscopic hematuria, and normal kidney function. Kidney biopsy was consistent with MPGN pattern (...) restriction), laser microdissection and mass spectrometry were performed on the kidney biopsy tissue. This identified the deposits as monoclonal IgG κ, thereby leading to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy-associated MPGN. Our case emphasizes the importance of searching for an underlying cause of MPGN, reviews the technique of laser microdissection-mass spectrometry, and highlights its application as a pathology tool for the evaluation of monoclonal gammopathy-related glomerulonephritis. Copyright ©

2013 American Journal of Kidney Diseases

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