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Gingivitis in HIV

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1. Gingivitis

removal of dental plaque by tooth brushing and cleaning between the teeth. Necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is a more serious condition that is mainly found in developing countries associated with people with severe malnutrition or HIV/AIDS with low CD4 T-cell counts. Definition Gingivitis is inflammation of the gingiva. The vast majority of cases are related to bacteria-induced inflammation caused by the dental plaque (bacterial biofilm) that forms daily on the teeth. Necrotising ulcerative (...) mellitus pregnancy severe malnutrition or marginal nutritional deficiencies HIV/AIDS (in necrotising ulcerative gingivitis [NUG]) stress (in necrotising ulcerative gingivitis [NUG]) stress (in plaque-associated gingivitis) xerostomic medicines male gender shared living conditions (necrotising ulcerative gingivitis) high alcohol intake substance abuse Diagnostic investigations clinical diagnosis Treatment algorithm ACUTE Contributors Authors Professor of Oral Medicine and Medical Technologies Department

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Gingival Recession and Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Among HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy. (PubMed)

Gingival Recession and Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Among HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy. Limited information is available on gingival recession or localised aggressive periodontitis among HIV-infected children and adolescents. This study reports on the prevalence of these conditions among children and adolescents receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART).A cross-sectional study on HIV-infected children and adolescents attending a Paediatric HIV clinic (...) %) presented with gingival recession on permanent mandibular incisors and/or localised aggressive periodontitis of molar teeth. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that patients with gingival recession and aggressive periodontitis had a significantly shorter duration of ART, and were more likely to have suboptimal HIV-control (CD4 count ≤500 cells/µL and/or HIV viral load ≥50 copies/mL) and be on advanced ART regimens after virological failure on 1- and 2-line treatment.The results emphasise

2018 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

3. Unexpected Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis in a Well-controlled HIV-infected Case (PubMed)

Unexpected Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis in a Well-controlled HIV-infected Case We herein report the case of a 41-year-old Japanese man with well-controlled HIV who presented with diagnostically difficult acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG). After diet-induced weight loss, he developed oral pain and disturbance of mouth opening, and was admitted to our hospital. Based on preconceptions of HIV-associated diseases, fluconazole was initiated for candidiasis. However (...) , no improvement was seen and ANUG was finally diagnosed. This case suggests that physicians should consider ANUG in HIV-infected individuals when several risk factors are present, even if CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts have remained stable owing to long-term anti-retroviral therapy.

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2017 Internal Medicine

4. A Clinical Trial to Evaluate Kerecis Oralâ„¢ Compared to Autogenous Free Gingival Graft (AFGG) Tissue to Augment Gingival Soft Tissue and Wound Healing

A Clinical Trial to Evaluate Kerecis Oralâ„¢ Compared to Autogenous Free Gingival Graft (AFGG) Tissue to Augment Gingival Soft Tissue and Wound Healing A Clinical Trial to Evaluate Kerecis Oral™ Compared to Autogenous Free Gingival Graft (AFGG) Tissue to Augment Gingival Soft Tissue and Wound Healing - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved (...) Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Clinical Trial to Evaluate Kerecis Oral™ Compared to Autogenous Free Gingival Graft (AFGG) Tissue to Augment Gingival Soft Tissue and Wound Healing The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our

2018 Clinical Trials

5. Gingivitis in HIV

Gingivitis in HIV Gingivitis in HIV Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gingivitis in HIV Gingivitis in HIV Aka (...) : Gingivitis in HIV , Periodontal Disease in HIV II. Epidemiology occurs in 5-10% of HIV patients III. Periodontal Conditions in HIV Necrotizing ulcerative Linear l erythema (Candida infection) IV. Symptoms Painful gums Halitosis l retraction and pocketing V. Management Regular dental care and dental cleaning Debridement and curettage Chlorhexidine deglutinate mouth rinse Removal of soft and hard deposits agents Antibiotics (Short course may be beneficial) VI. Reference Images: Related links to external

2018 FP Notebook

6. Gingivitis and periodontitis

surfaces of the arms). Conjunctiva may be involved in pemphigoid. Causes of gingival bleeding, including platelet disorders, vascular conditions, leukaemia, and HIV infection. Gum hypertrophy caused by drugs: Most commonly caused by phenytoin, calcium-channel blockers (amlodipine, diltiazem, felodipine, nifedipine, and verapamil), or ciclosporin. About 50% of people taking phenytoin, 30% of those taking ciclosporin, and 10% of those taking nifedipine will develop gum hypertrophy. Rarely, other drugs (...) Gingivitis and periodontitis Gingivitis and periodontitis - NICE CKS Clinical Knowledge Summaries Share Gingivitis and periodontitis: Summary Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums. Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) is an acute, atypical, progressive, and painful bacterial infection of the gums with ulceration and necrosis of the dental papillae and bleeding. Periodontitis is chronic inflammation involving the supporting tissues around the teeth with largely irreversible tissue

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

7. HIV

worldwide. HIV -2 is found mainly in West Africa but has also (...) been reported in Portugal, France, and increasingly in India and South America. Infected bodily fluid can transmit HIV : By sexual activity — through vaginal, anal, or oral sex (especially in the presence of oral disease such as ulceration or gingivitis). Vertically from mother to child — during pregnancy, childbirth, or with breastfeeding. By inoculation — via a contaminated needle, instrument, blood, or blood product; through direct (...) HIV Top results for hiv - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4) Loading

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

8. Induced Gingivitis & Intra-oral Imaging

Induced Gingivitis & Intra-oral Imaging Induced Gingivitis & Intra-oral Imaging - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Induced Gingivitis & Intra-oral Imaging The safety and scientific validity (...) by (Responsible Party): Richard Darveau, University of Washington Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Using an experimental, non-invasive intra-oral imaging device, this study evaluates the effects on the gingival tissue when oral hygiene is stopped in a section of the mouth for two weeks and gingivitis develops. The effects on the gingival tissue continues to be evaluated as oral hygiene is resumed and the gingival tissue returns to health. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase

2018 Clinical Trials

9. Biomarkers of oral inflammation in perinatally HIV-infected and perinatally HIV-exposed, uninfected youth. (PubMed)

Biomarkers of oral inflammation in perinatally HIV-infected and perinatally HIV-exposed, uninfected youth. To examine oral biomarkers that have been associated with periodontal disease progression in HIV-infected adults in perinatally HIV-infected and HIV-exposed but uninfected youth.This was a cross-sectional, multicentre substudy of youth participating in the Oral Health Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort study. Gingival crevicular fluid repository samples from participants with and without (...) periodontal disease (using Gingival Index [GI] and Bleeding on Probing [BOP] parameters on dental examination) were tested for concentration levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Associations were assessed using Wilcoxon test and Spearman correlation.For perinatal HIV youth (n = 129), the markers consistently elevated (p < .05) in sites with GI ≥2 and in sites with BOP were interleukin-1β, 6 and 13, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and metalloproteinase-9. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α and soluble CD14

2019 Journal of Clinical Periodontology

10. Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5

interdental and orally oriented fillings are allowed); Non-pigmented gingiva; Signed informed consent. Exclusion Criteria: Subjects with severe systemic diseases (e.g. hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection, tuberculosis, acute cancer treatment); Subjects who require endocarditis prophylaxis for dental examination and treatment; Subjects with caries requiring treatment (e.g. caries with cavity) or other oral diseases (including gingival hyperplasia, diseases of the oral mucosa); Subjects (...) Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5 Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more

2017 Clinical Trials

11. Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5

Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5 Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5 - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more (...) studies before adding more. Study to Assess the Inhibition of Plaque Formation in Subjects With a Gingival Index ≤1.5 The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03322124 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : October 26, 2017 Last Update Posted : January 21, 2019 Sponsor: Schülke & Mayr

2017 Clinical Trials

12. Coronally Advanced Flap and PRF With or Without Demineralized Freeze-dried Bone Allograft in Gingival Recession

Coronally Advanced Flap and PRF With or Without Demineralized Freeze-dried Bone Allograft in Gingival Recession Coronally Advanced Flap and PRF With or Without Demineralized Freeze-dried Bone Allograft in Gingival Recession - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Coronally Advanced Flap and PRF With or Without Demineralized Freeze-dried Bone Allograft in Gingival Recession The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02835430 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : July 18, 2016 Last

2016 Clinical Trials

13. HIV Status Does Not Worsen Oral Health Outcomes. (PubMed)

and selected all HIV-positive subjects (N=73) and matched them by age, sex, ethnicity, and smoking habits with 261 HIV-negative control subjects. Based on these 334 total individuals, several dental conditions, including the need for root canal treatment, gingivitis, periodontitis, hairy leukoplakia, and dental caries were compared between the two groups. Overall there was no difference in dental disease between the HIV-positive and -negative groups. In our data, it was found that the prevalence (...) HIV Status Does Not Worsen Oral Health Outcomes. Last January 31st , Journal of Clinical Periodontology just made available the report titled "A Retrospective Analysis of Dental Implant Survival in HIV Patients", which concluded that "implants placed in HIV-positive patients had similar survival rates as HIV-negative patients." These data support our hypothesis that infection by HIV does not lead to worse oral health outcomes, including worse periodontitis. We looked 6,092 individuals

2019 Journal of Clinical Periodontology

14. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth (PubMed)

in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2-2.9)], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0-1.3)], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0-3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1-1.7)] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6-1.0)]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health (...) The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU).In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT), Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT), oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD). Covariates for oral health parameters were examined

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2016 PloS one

15. Prevalence of Periodontal Diseases in a Multicenter Cohort of Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-exposed and Uninfected Youth. (PubMed)

Prevalence of Periodontal Diseases in a Multicenter Cohort of Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-exposed and Uninfected Youth. To compare the prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases between 180 perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and 118 perinatally HIV-exposed and uninfected (PHEU) youth in a cross-sectional study conducted at 11 clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico from the Adolescent Master Protocol study of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS cohort study (PHACS) network.Several (...) analyses were conducted, employing the current CDC/AAP classification for periodontitis and incorporating a definition of gingivitis based on a bleeding on probing (BOP) threshold, and analyses based on more detailed whole-mouth, intra-oral regionally, site-based and tooth-based criteria of BOP, plaque levels, pockets depths and clinical attachment levels.After adjusting for plaque control habits and behavioural and sociodemographic factors, there were no significant differences in periodontal diseases

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2016 Journal of Clinical Periodontology

16. Gingivitis in HIV

Gingivitis in HIV Gingivitis in HIV Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Gingivitis in HIV Gingivitis in HIV Aka (...) : Gingivitis in HIV , Periodontal Disease in HIV II. Epidemiology occurs in 5-10% of HIV patients III. Periodontal Conditions in HIV Necrotizing ulcerative Linear l erythema (Candida infection) IV. Symptoms Painful gums Halitosis l retraction and pocketing V. Management Regular dental care and dental cleaning Debridement and curettage Chlorhexidine deglutinate mouth rinse Removal of soft and hard deposits agents Antibiotics (Short course may be beneficial) VI. Reference Images: Related links to external

2015 FP Notebook

17. Periodontal Therapy on HIV Patients Undergoing HAART May Provide Slight Benefit in Periodontal Health

). Periodontal monitoring and early therapy is suggested regardless if the patient is on HAART therapy. #2) John/2013 120 randomly selected male and female HIV-positive patients aged between 17-55 years of age Case Control Study Key results No significant differences were found between patients on HAART and their plaque index or their gingival index. However, it was shown that HAART patients' probing depths and clinical attachments were significantly affected (p= 0.0065 and p= 0.0029). Evidence Search (...) Periodontal Therapy on HIV Patients Undergoing HAART May Provide Slight Benefit in Periodontal Health UTCAT2849, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Periodontal Therapy on HIV Patients Undergoing HAART May Provide Slight Benefit in Periodontal Health Clinical Question In adult HIV patients undergoing HAART, are clinical outcomes (BOP, clinical attachments, and reduction in pocket depth) from periodontal

2015 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

18. HIV, viral hepatitis and STIs - a guide for primary care

HIV, viral hepatitis and STIs - a guide for primary care HIV , VIRAL HEPATITIS & STIs SUPPOR TING THE HIV, VIR AL HEPATITIS AND SEXUAL HEALTH WORKFOR CE A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS HIV, VIRAL HEPATITIS & STIsHIV, VIRAL HEPATITIS AND STIs – A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE i HIV , VIRAL HEPATITIS & STIs SUPPOR TING THE HIV, VIRAL HEPATITIS AND SEXUAL HEALTH W ORKFOR CE A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY CAREii HIV, VIRAL HEPATITIS AND STIs – A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY HEALTH CAREHIV, VIRAL HEPATITIS AND STIs (...) – A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY HEALTH CARE iii HIV , VIRAL HEPATITIS & STIs A GUIDE FOR PRIMARY CARE 2014 EDITION EXPERT REFERENCE GROUP (EDITORIAL OVERSIGHT) Dr Michael Burke Nepean Sexual Health & HIV Clinic Ms Tracey Cabrie Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Melbourne Health Associate Professor Ben Cowie Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne Professor Greg Dore The Kirby Institute, UNSW Australia Dr Seamus Duffy Tuggerah Medical Centre Dr

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

19. The association between oral disease and type of antiretroviral therapy among perinatally HIV-Infected youth. (PubMed)

The association between oral disease and type of antiretroviral therapy among perinatally HIV-Infected youth. This study explores the association between combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and oral health outcomes (dental and periodontal) among perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) youth.We conducted a cross-sectional study of oral health among PHIV youth participating in the Oral Health substudy of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS). Dentists at research sites were trained/calibrated (...) on how to perform a standardized oral mucosal, dental and periodontal examination. They assessed the decayed-missing-filled-surfaces and teeth index (DMFS/T). The number of decayed surfaces and teeth and the number of teeth with gingival bleeding on probing for each participant were derived from the examination. Data for analysis included lifetime measurements of CD4 cell count and viral load, sociodemographic information and current/past history of ART.Among 209 PHIV youth, 95% were on ART

2018 AIDS

20. Plasma cell gingivitis (PubMed)

be aware of effects of these products. Early diagnosis is essential as plasma cell gingivitis has similar pathologic changes seen clinically as in leukemia, HIV infection, discoid lupus erythematosis, atrophic lichen planus, desquamative gingivitis, or cicatrical pemphigoid which must be differentiated through hematologic and serologic testing. (...) Plasma cell gingivitis The aim of the article is to present a report on the clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis with the use of herbal toothpowder. Plasma cell gingivitis [PCG] is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterized by sharply demarcated erythematous and edematous gingivitis often extending to the mucogingival junction. As the name suggests it is diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial gingival tissue. It is a hypersensitivity

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2015 Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology

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