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Gestational Diabetes Management

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161. Effect of antenatal depression on gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effect of antenatal depression on gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files (...) , see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one experimental group, we will correct the total number of control

2020 PROSPERO

162. A meta-analysis of the effect of vitamin plus trace element co-supplementation on the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes

A meta-analysis of the effect of vitamin plus trace element co-supplementation on the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) will yield the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than

2020 PROSPERO

163. Effectiveness of Telemedicine on Glycemic Control and Pregnancy Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Updated Meta-Analysis of 32 Randomized Controlled Trials with Trial Sequential Analysis

Effectiveness of Telemedicine on Glycemic Control and Pregnancy Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Updated Meta-Analysis of 32 Randomized Controlled Trials with Trial Sequential Analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete (...) between-study variance be very low or zero, the random-effects model will yield the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre

2020 PROSPERO

164. Effect of Probiotics Intake on Infant Birth Weight in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes or Overweight: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Effect of Probiotics Intake on Infant Birth Weight in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes or Overweight: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) will yield the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than

2020 PROSPERO

165. Treatment effects of vitamin and other nutrient co-supplementation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes.

Treatment effects of vitamin and other nutrient co-supplementation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes. Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration (...) the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one

2020 PROSPERO

166. Treatment effects of vitamin and nutrient co-supplementation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Treatment effects of vitamin and nutrient co-supplementation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability (...) will yield the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than

2020 PROSPERO

167. Aerobic or resistance exercise for improved glycaemic control and obstetric outcomes in women with gestational diabetes. A protocol for a systematic review.

Aerobic or resistance exercise for improved glycaemic control and obstetric outcomes in women with gestational diabetes. A protocol for a systematic review. Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) will yield the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than

2020 PROSPERO

168. adverse foetal outcomes in gestational diabetes

adverse foetal outcomes in gestational diabetes Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith (...) meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one experimental group, we will correct the total number of control animals in the meta-analysis

2020 PROSPERO

169. Fetal biometry for guiding the medical management of women with gestational diabetes mellitus for improving maternal and perinatal health [Cochrane protocol]

Fetal biometry for guiding the medical management of women with gestational diabetes mellitus for improving maternal and perinatal health [Cochrane protocol] Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr (...) of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one experimental group, we will correct the total number of control animals in the meta-analysis by dividing the number of animals in the control group

2017 PROSPERO

170. Care of Women Presenting with Suspected Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes from 24+0 Weeks of Gestation Full Text available with Trip Pro

, Bowen, JPJ , Bond, DM , Algert, CS , Thornton, JG , Crowther, CA . Immediate delivery compared with expectant management after preterm pre‐labour rupture of the membranes close to term (PPROMT trial): a randomised controlled trial . Lancet 2016 ; 387 : 444 – 52 . 3 Peaceman, AM , Lai, Y , Rouse, DJ , Spong, CY , Mercer, BM , Varner, MW , et al. Length of latency with preterm premature rupture of membranes before 32 weeks’ gestation . Am J Perinatol 2015 ; 32 : 57 – 62 . 4 Dale, PO , Tanbo, T (...) 2011 ; 18 : 645 – 53 . 43 Bond, DM , Middleton, P , Levett, KM , van der Ham, DP , Crowther, CA , Buchanan, SL , et al. Planned early birth versus expectant management for women with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes prior to 37 weeks’ gestation for improving pregnancy outcome . Cochrane Database of Syst Rev 2017 ;: CD004735 . 44 Getahun, D , Strickland, D , Ananth, CV , Fassett, MJ , Sacks, DA , Kirby, RS , et al. Recurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes in relation to interval

2019 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

171. Service evaluation of diabetes management during pregnancy in a regional maternity hospital: potential scope for increased self-management and remote patient monitoring through mHealth solutions. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Service evaluation of diabetes management during pregnancy in a regional maternity hospital: potential scope for increased self-management and remote patient monitoring through mHealth solutions. Pre-gestational and gestational diabetes mellitus are common complications in pregnancy affecting one in six pregnancies. The maternity services are under significant strain managing the increasing number of complex pregnancies. This has an impact on patients' experience of antenatal care. Therefore (...) , there is a clear need to address pregnancy care. One possible solution is to use home-based digital technology to reduce clinic visits and improve clinical monitoring.The aim of this study was to evaluate the antenatal services provided to pregnant women with diabetes who were monitored at the joint metabolic and obstetric clinic at the Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland.The questionnaires were completed by sixty-three women, most of whom had gestational diabetes mellitus. Most

2019 BMC health services research

172. "Why screen if we cannot follow-up and manage?" Challenges for gestational diabetes screening and management in low and lower-middle income countries: results of a cross-sectional survey. Full Text available with Trip Pro

"Why screen if we cannot follow-up and manage?" Challenges for gestational diabetes screening and management in low and lower-middle income countries: results of a cross-sectional survey. The prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM) in low and lower middle income countries (LLMIC) is increasing. Despite its associated short and long term complications for mothers and their newborns, there is a lack of knowledge about how to detect and manage GDM. The objective of our study was to identify (...) the challenges that first line healthcare providers in LLMIC face in screening and management of GDM.We conducted a cross-sectional survey of key informants from 40 low and lower-middle income countries in Africa, South-Asia and Latin-America by sending out questionnaires to 182 gynecologists, endocrinologists and medical doctors. Sixty-seven respondents from 26 LLMIC provided information on the challenges they encounter. Data was thematically analyzed and revealed eight overarching themes, including

2016 BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

173. Screening and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus*

of Difference There are no significant areas of disagreement between the guidelines. Screening and Diagnosis of GDM TES (2013) NGC Note : See the TES guideline summary for recommendations on the following topics, which are beyond the scope of this synthesis: Preconception care of women with diabetes Testing for overt diabetes in early pregnancy Management of gestational diabetes Labor, delivery, lactation and postpartum care Gestational Diabetes Testing for Gestational Diabetes at 24 to 28 Weeks Gestation (...) Screening and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus* Screening and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUL Aug 12 2018 2019 30 Sep 2016 - 13 Jul 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective dedicated to saving copies of rapidly dying or deleted websites for the sake of history and digital heritage. The group is 100% composed

2014 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

174. ADIPS Consensus guidelines for the testing and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in Australia

ADIPS Consensus guidelines for the testing and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in Australia Page 1 of 8 ADIPS Consensus Guidelines for the Testing and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Australia Nankervis A, McIntyre HD, Moses R, Ross GP, Callaway L, Porter C, Jeffries W, Boorman C, De Vries B, McElduff A for the Australasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society The Australasian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society (ADIPS) originally formulated recommendations for the testing (...) and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in 1991. 1 These guidelines were primarily based on expert opinion. With some local variations, the ADIPS guidelines have been used nationally since that time. In the light of more recent evidence, ADIPS has elected to revise these guidelines in the current document. Recommendations for future research are summarized at the end of this document. The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study (HAPO) published in 2008 2 was a large, prospective

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

175. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Screening

evidence about the benefits and harms of screening before 24 weeks of gestation. Treatment Initial treatment includes moderate physical activity, dietary changes, support from diabetes educators and nutritionists, and glucose monitoring. If the patient's glucose is not controlled after these initial interventions, she may be prescribed medication (either insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents), or have increased surveillance in prenatal care or changes in delivery management. Suggestions for Practice (...) Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation to see the latest documents available. Recommendation Summary Population Recommendation Asymptomatic Pregnant Women, After 24 Weeks of Gestation The USPSTF recommends screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in asymptomatic pregnant women after 24 weeks of gestation. B Asymptomatic Pregnant Women, Before 24 Weeks

2014 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

176. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Treating mild gestational diabetes yields benefits with little or no evidence of harms

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Treating mild gestational diabetes yields benefits with little or no evidence of harms Treating mild gestational diabetes yields benefits with little or no evidence of harms | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Treating mild gestational diabetes yields benefits with little or no evidence of harms Article Text Therapeutics Systematic review with meta-analysis Treating mild gestational

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine

177. Gestational hypertension

' gestation in a previously normotensive patient, without the presence of proteinuria. Patient requires regular monitoring of BP and urinalysis during the pregnancy to exclude pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes. Mild hypertension is managed with lifestyle modification and antihypertensive therapy. Severe hypertension (BP ≥160/110 mmHg) requires admission for antihypertensive therapy. For women over 37 weeks' gestation, induction should be considered. Definition Gestational hypertension is defined (...) by sustained BP readings of ≥140/90 mmHg during pregnancy after 20 weeks’ gestation in a previously normotensive patient, without the presence of proteinuria (<300 mg in 24 hours). All manifestations of gestational hypertension are presumptive until retrospectively confirmed by complete resolution of hypertension and any other new abnormalities by 12 weeks postpartum; otherwise, other diagnoses should be considered. Sibai BM. Diagnosis and management of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. Obstet

2018 BMJ Best Practice

178. Clinical practice guideline for the care of women with decreased fetal movements for women with a singleton pregnancy from 28 weeks’ gestation

state of the mother during pregnancy to facilitate the energy supply of the fetus. Hypertension (Maternal) Elevated blood pressure exceeding 140/90 mmHg. Hypoglycaemia (Neonatal) Low level of blood glucose ( 24 hours) as well as sudden loss of fetal movements was reported in 47%-64% of all stillbirths 97,100 . 4.4 Investigations for DFM prior to 28 weeks’ gestation There is currently insufficient evidence to inform the management of women who report DFM prior to 28 weeks’ gestation. Between 20 (...) concerns of DFM at time of assessment. 16,25,27 C v v The first step in the management of DFM is to ensure the fetus is alive and not in imminent danger of death. A handheld Doppler can immediately confirm the presence of a fetal heartbeat. A cardiotocography (CTG) may be performed to detect a fetal heart beat and to establish the fetal heart rate (FHR) pattern in women greater than 28+0 weeks’ gestation. In both situations, a fetal heartbeat needs to be differentiated from the maternal heartbeat

2019 Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth

179. Management of adults with diabetes undergoing surgery

. Unfortunately, the NHS is often unable to cope with these individual needs during the hospital stay 19,27 . The guidelines emphasised the importance of allowing the person with diabetes to retain control of diabetes management during their admission unless their medical condition prevents them from doing so. There is also a JBDS14 guideline on self-management of diabetes in hospital 29 . Although the main focus is on elective surgery and procedures much of the guidance applies equally to the management (...) Management of adults with diabetes undergoing surgery Management of adults with diabetes undergoing surgery and elective procedures: Improving standards Revised March 2016Lead authorship Dr Ketan Dhatariya – Consultant in Diabetes, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Dr Nicholas Levy – Consultant in Anaesthesia, West Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust Dr Daniel Flanagan – Consultant in Diabetes, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust Louise Hilton – Senior Diabetes Nurse, Bolton PCT

2016 Association of British Clinical Diabetologists

180. The role of smartwatch technology in the provision of care for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes: a systematic review

The role of smartwatch technology in the provision of care for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus or gestational diabetes: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content (...) the same results as the fixed-effect model. For further details, see the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Because of the exploratory nature of animal studies, a random effects model will be used to account for anticipated heterogeneity. ">Effect models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one

2019 PROSPERO

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