How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

336,072 results for

Generic Drug

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Newer Generation Ultra-Thin Strut Drug-Eluting Stents versus Older Second-Generation Thicker Strut Drug-Eluting Stents for Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

Newer Generation Ultra-Thin Strut Drug-Eluting Stents versus Older Second-Generation Thicker Strut Drug-Eluting Stents for Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials Contemporary second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have superior efficacy and safety in comparison with early-generation stents in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, in part, related to their thinner struts. Whether newer-generation ultrathin DES further improve clinical outcomes (...) in comparison with older second-generation thicker strut DES is unknown.We searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized clinical trials that compared newer-generation ultrathin strut DES (defined as strut thickness <70 µm) versus thicker strut second-generation DES and reported clinical outcomes. The primary outcome was target lesion failure (composite of cardiovascular death, target vessel myocardial infarction or ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 EvidenceUpdates

2. Differences in rates of switchbacks after switching from branded to authorized generic and branded to generic drug products: cohort study. (PubMed)

Differences in rates of switchbacks after switching from branded to authorized generic and branded to generic drug products: cohort study. To compare rates of switchbacks to branded drug products for patients switched from branded to authorized generic drug products, which have the same active ingredients, appearance, and excipients as the branded product, with patients switched from branded to generic drug products, which have the same active ingredients as the branded product but may differ (...) extended release tablets, quinapril tablets, and sertraline tablets) were identified when they switched to an authorized generic or a generic drug product after the date of market entry of generic drug products. These patients were followed for switchbacks to the branded drug product in the year after their switch to an authorized generic or a generic drug product. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals after adjusting for demographics, including

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 BMJ

3. Interchangeability of Generic Drugs: A Nonparametric Pharmacokinetic Model of Gabapentin Generic Drugs (PubMed)

Interchangeability of Generic Drugs: A Nonparametric Pharmacokinetic Model of Gabapentin Generic Drugs Substitution by generic drugs is allowed when bioequivalence to the originator drug has been established. However, it is known that similarity in exposure may not be achieved at every occasion for all individual patients when switching between formulations. The ultimate aim of our research is to investigate if pharmacokinetic subpopulations exist when subjects are exposed to bioequivalent (...) formulations. For that purpose, we developed a pharmacokinetic model for gabapentin, based on data from a previously conducted bioavailability study comparing gabapentin exposure following administration of the gabapentin originator and three generic gabapentin formulations in healthy subjects. Both internal and external validation confirmed that the optimal model for description of the gabapentin pharmacokinetics in this comparative bioavailability study was a two-compartment model with absorption

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics

4. Long-term Safety and Efficacy of New-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents in Women With Acute Myocardial Infarction: From the Women in Innovation and Drug-Eluting Stents (WIN-DES) Collaboration (PubMed)

Long-term Safety and Efficacy of New-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents in Women With Acute Myocardial Infarction: From the Women in Innovation and Drug-Eluting Stents (WIN-DES) Collaboration Women with acute myocardial infarction (MI) undergoing mechanical reperfusion remain at increased risk of adverse cardiac events and mortality compared with their male counterparts. Whether the benefits of new-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) are preserved in women with acute MI remains unclear.To (...) investigate the long-term safety and efficacy of new-generation DES vs early-generation DES in women with acute MI.Collaborative, international, individual patient-level data of women enrolled in 26 randomized clinical trials of DES were analyzed between July and December 2016. Only women presenting with an acute coronary syndrome were included. Study population was categorized according to presentation with unstable angina (UA) vs acute MI. Acute MI included non-ST-segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) or ST

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 JAMA cardiology

5. Comparative effectiveness review of biolimus-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents and second-generation drug-eluting stents

Comparative effectiveness review of biolimus-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents and second-generation drug-eluting stents Comparative effectiveness review of biolimus-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents and second-generation drug-eluting stents Comparative effectiveness review of biolimus-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents and second-generation drug-eluting stents HAYES, Inc. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc.. Comparative effectiveness review of biolimus-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents and second-generation drug-eluting stents. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2016 Authors' conclusions Drug-eluting stents (DES) are a device/drug combination product consisting of a coronary stent coated in an antiproliferative drug. Stents are placed within an obstructed artery during percutaneous coronary intervention

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

6. Practice Advisory: FDA Warnings Regarding Use of General Anesthetics and Sedation Drugs in Young Children and Pregnant Women

Practice Advisory: FDA Warnings Regarding Use of General Anesthetics and Sedation Drugs in Young Children and Pregnant Women Practice Advisory: FDA Warnings Regarding Use of General Anesthetics and Sedation Drugs in Young Children and Pregnant Women - ACOG Menu ▼ Practice Advisory: FDA Warnings Regarding Use of General Anesthetics and Sedation Drugs in Young Children and Pregnant Women Page Navigation ▼ Share: Practice Advisory: FDA Warnings Regarding Use of General Anesthetics and Sedation (...) Drugs in Young Children and Pregnant Women December 21, 2016 This is an area of evolving care and practice. Fellows should check periodically for revisions and updates. ACOG will communicate important changes and updates to these guidelines. On December 14, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Drug Safety Communications entitled " " (1,2). In this announcement, the FDA announced that it will require warnings to be added to the labels of general anesthetic and sedation drugs

2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

7. Generic-reference and generic-generic bioequivalence of forty-two, randomly-selected, on-market generic products of fourteen immediate-release oral drugs (PubMed)

Generic-reference and generic-generic bioequivalence of forty-two, randomly-selected, on-market generic products of fourteen immediate-release oral drugs The extents of generic-reference and generic-generic average bioequivalence and intra-subject variation of on-market drug products have not been prospectively studied on a large scale.We assessed bioequivalence of 42 generic products of 14 immediate-release oral drugs with the highest number of generic products on the Saudi market. We (...) bioequivalence. Average geometric mean ratio deviation from 100% was ≤3.2 and ≤5.4 percentage points for AUCI and Cmax, respectively, in both generic-reference and generic-generic comparisons. Individual generic/reference and generic/generic ratios, respectively, were within the ±25% range in >75% of individuals in 79% and 71% of the 14 drugs for AUCT and 36% and 29% for Cmax.On-market generic drug products continue to be reference-bioequivalent and are bioequivalent to each other based on AUCT, AUCI

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 BMC pharmacology & toxicology

8. Presence, persistence and effects of pre-treatment HIV-1 drug resistance variants detected using next generation sequencing: A Retrospective longitudinal study from rural coastal Kenya. (PubMed)

Presence, persistence and effects of pre-treatment HIV-1 drug resistance variants detected using next generation sequencing: A Retrospective longitudinal study from rural coastal Kenya. The epidemiology of HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) determined by Sanger capillary sequencing, has been widely studied. However, much less is known about HIVDR detected using next generation sequencing (NGS) methods. We aimed to determine the presence, persistence and effect of pre-treatment HIVDR variants (...) ]), but not for PI variants (r = -0.117 [p = 0.803]). Participants with pre-treatment NRTI and/or NNRTI resistance had increased odds of sVF (OR = 6.0; 95% CI = 1.0-36.9; p = 0.054).Using NGS, pre-treatment resistance variants were common, though observed PI variants were unlikely transmitted, but rather probably generated de novo. Even when detected from a low frequency, pre-treatment NRTI and/or NNRTI resistance variants may adversely affect treatment outcomes.

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 PLoS ONE

9. Comparison of Generic-to-Brand Switchback Rates Between Generic and Authorized Generic Drugs. (PubMed)

Comparison of Generic-to-Brand Switchback Rates Between Generic and Authorized Generic Drugs. Generic drugs contain identical active ingredients as their corresponding brand drugs and are pharmaceutically equivalent and bioequivalent, whereas authorized generic drugs (AGs) contain both identical active and inactive ingredients as their corresponding brand drugs but are marketed as generics. This study compares generic-to-brand switchback rates between generic and AGs.Retrospective cohort (...) study.Claims and electronic health record data from a regional U.S. health care system.The full cohort consisted of 5542 unique patients who received select branded drugs during the 6 months prior to their generic drug market availability (between 1999 and 2014) and then were switched to an AG or generic drug within 30 months of generic drug entry. For these patients, 5929 unique patient-drug combinations (867 with AGs and 5062 with generic drugs) were evaluated.Ten drugs with AGs and generics marketed

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Pharmacotherapy

10. Drug use generations and patterns of injection drug use: Birth cohort differences among people who inject drugs in Los Angeles and San Francisco, California (PubMed)

Drug use generations and patterns of injection drug use: Birth cohort differences among people who inject drugs in Los Angeles and San Francisco, California A robust literature documents generational trends in drug use. We examined the implications of changing national drug use patterns on drug injection histories of diverse people who inject drugs (PWID).Drug use histories were collected from 776 active PWID in 2011-13. Using descriptive statistics, we examine drug use initiation by year (...) and birth cohort (BC) differences in drug first injected. A multivariate linear regression model of time to injection initiation ([TTII] (year of first injection minus year of first illicit drug use) was developed to explore BC differences.The first drug injected by BC changed in tandem with national drug use trends with heroin declining from 77% for the pre-1960's BC to 58% for the 1960's BC before increasing to 71% for the 1990's BC. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that shorter TTII

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Drug and alcohol dependence

11. Five-year major clinical outcomes between first-generation and second-generation drug-eluting stents in acute myocardial infarction patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PubMed)

Five-year major clinical outcomes between first-generation and second-generation drug-eluting stents in acute myocardial infarction patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention There were limited data comparing the major clinical outcomes between first-generation (1G)-drug eluting stents (DES) and second-generation (2G)-DES in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during very long follow-up periods. We thought to investigate (...) infarction (MI), target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), non-target vessel revascularization (Non-TVR) and the secondary endpoint was stent thrombosis (ST) at 5 years.Two propensity score-matched (PSM) groups (232 pairs, n = 464, C-statistic = 0.802) were generated. During the 5-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of TLR [hazard ratio (HR): 3.133; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.539-6.376; P = 0.002], TVR (HR: 3.144; 95% CI: 1.596-6.192; P = 0.001

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of geriatric cardiology : JGC

12. Generalized polyspike train: An EEG biomarker of drug-resistant idiopathic generalized epilepsy. (PubMed)

Generalized polyspike train: An EEG biomarker of drug-resistant idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To identify clinical and EEG biomarkers of drug resistance in adults with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.We conducted a case-control study consisting of a discovery cohort and a replication cohort independently assessed at 2 different centers. In each center, patients with the idiopathic generalized epilepsy phenotype and generalized spike-wave discharges on EEG were classified as drug-resistant (...) , 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5-214, p < 0.001; 3 vs 2: OR = 14.6, 95% CI: 2.3-93.1, p = 0.004) and generalized polyspike train (burst of generalized rhythmic spikes lasting less than 1 second) during sleep were associated with drug resistance (OR = 10.8, 95% CI: 2.4-49.4, p = 0.002). When these factors were tested in the replication cohort of 80 patients (27.5% drug-resistant and 72.5% drug-responsive; 71.3% female; median age 27.5 years), the proportion of patients with generalized polyspike

2018 Neurology

13. Consequences on economic outcomes of generic versus brand-name drugs used in routine clinical practice: The case of treating peripheral neuropathic pain or generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin. (PubMed)

Consequences on economic outcomes of generic versus brand-name drugs used in routine clinical practice: The case of treating peripheral neuropathic pain or generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin. Discrepancies are seen between arguments in favor of and against prescribing generic versus brand-name drugs.To provide real-world evidence on treatment persistence, economic and clinical outcomes of pregabalin, generic versus brand-name (Lyrica®, Pfizer), routinely used to treat neuropathic pain (...) (NP) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).Electronic medical records from subjects' first starting treatment with pregabalin between January-2015 and June-2016 were analyzed. Persistence, resources utilization, and costs were assessed, along with remitter and responder rates.A total of 4860 records were analyzed. Discontinuation was lower with brand-name than with generic in NP (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.70 [95% CI: 0.58-0.85], p < 0.001) and GAD patients (HR: 0.63 [0.45-0.84], p < 0.001

2018 Expert review of pharmacoeconomics & outcomes research

14. Comparison of 1-Year Outcomes of Triple (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Cilostazol) Versus Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Placebo) After Implantation of Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents into One or More Coronary Arteries: from the DECREA

Comparison of 1-Year Outcomes of Triple (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Cilostazol) Versus Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (Aspirin + Clopidogrel + Placebo) After Implantation of Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents into One or More Coronary Arteries: from the DECREA This study sought to evaluate the impact of triple antiplatelet therapy on clinical outcomes in patients treated with second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) for coronary artery disease. There are limited data regarding the impact (...) of triple antiplatelet therapy in patients who underwent implantation of second-generation DES. We planned to randomly assign 2,110 patients treated with second-generation DES to triple (aspirin, clopidogrel, and cilostazol) and dual (aspirin, clopidogrel, and placebo) antiplatelet therapy groups. The primary end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or target vessel revascularization (TVR) at 1 year since randomization. The study was stopped early owing to slow

2018 EvidenceUpdates

15. Trifluoperazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. (PubMed)

Trifluoperazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between any other antipsychotic compounds, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are often perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds by clinicians, and they also seem to differ in their side-effects.To review the effects in response to treatment (...) of trifluoperazine and low-potency antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (November 2010).We included all randomised trials comparing trifluoperazine with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis.We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Cochrane

16. Haloperidol versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. (PubMed)

Haloperidol versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between antipsychotic compounds, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are often clinically perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds, and they also seem to differ in their side-effects.To review the effects in clinical response of haloperidol and low-potency (...) antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2010).We included all randomised trials comparing haloperidol with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis.We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data, we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we

2014 Cochrane

17. Fluphenazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. (PubMed)

Fluphenazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between any other antipsychotic compounds, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are often perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds by clinicians, and they also seem to differ in their side effects. This review examined the effects of the high-potency (...) antipsychotic fluphenazine compared to those of low-potency antipsychotics.To review the effects of fluphenazine and low-potency antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2010).We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing fluphenazine with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis.We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2014 Cochrane

18. Flupenthixol versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. (PubMed)

Flupenthixol versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between antipsychotic drugs, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are sometimes perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds by clinicians, and they also seem to differ in their side effects.To review the effects in clinical response of flupenthixol and low-potency (...) antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2010).Randomised controlled trials that compared flupenthixol with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis.We extracted data independently. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) based on a random-effects model.The review currently includes one randomised trial from mainland China with 153 participants

2014 Cochrane

19. Perphenazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. (PubMed)

Perphenazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between the various first-generation antipsychotics, however, low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs are sometimes perceived as less efficacious than high-potency first-generation compounds by clinicians, and they also seem to differ in their side effects.To review (...) the effects of high-potency, first-generation perphenazine compared with low-potency, first-generation antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (October 2010).We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing perphenazine with first-generation, low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychoses.We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR

2014 Cochrane

20. Drug-Eluting Balloons versus Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents for Treating In-Stent Restenosis in Coronary Heart Disease after PCI: A Meta-Analysis (PubMed)

Drug-Eluting Balloons versus Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents for Treating In-Stent Restenosis in Coronary Heart Disease after PCI: A Meta-Analysis In-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a common problem following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, the best treatment strategy remains uncertain. There is some controversy over the efficacy of drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) and second-generation drug-eluting stents (DESs) for treating ISR.A meta-analysis was used to compare (...) the efficacy of the DEB and second-generation DES in the treatment of ISR. The primary endpoint is the incidence of target lesion revascularization (TLR). The secondary endpoint is the occurrence of target vessel revascularization (TVR), myocardial infarction (MI), all-cause death (ACM), cardiac death (CD), major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), minimum luminal diameter (MLD), late luminal loss (LLL), binary restenosis (BR), and percent diameter stenosis (DS%).A total of 12 studies (4 randomized controlled

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Cardiology research and practice

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>