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10661. Improving outcomes in urological cancers

/health_plan/content/nhsplan-e.pdf 3. A Policy Framework for Commissioning Cancer Services: A Report by the Expert Advisory Group on Cancer to the Chief Medical Officers of England and Wales (1995). Available from: http://www.doh.gov.uk/cancer/pdfs/calman-hine.pdf National Institute for Clinical Excellence 11 Strand London WC2N 5HR Web: www.nice.org.uk ISBN: 1-84257-210-5 Copies of this document can be obtained from the NHS Response Line by telephoning 0870 1555455 and quoting reference N0138. Bilingual (...) and service delivery. While cost impact has been calculated for the main recommendations, formal cost-effectiveness studies have not been performed.Guidance on Cancer Services Improving Outcomes in Urological Cancers The Manual Contents Foreword 3 Key recommendations 6 Background 7 The topic areas Generic issues 1. The urological cancer network and multidisciplinary teams 25 2. Diagnosis and assessment 40 3. Patient-centred care 52 4. Palliative care 60 Treatment for specific cancers 5. Prostate cancer 65

2002 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

10662. Improving outcomes in breast cancer

/nhsplan-e.pdf 3. A Policy Framework for Commissioning Cancer Services: A Report by the Expert Advisory Group on Cancer to the Chief Medical Officers of England and Wales (1995). Available from: http://www.doh.gov.uk/cancer/pdfs/calman-hine.pdf Related NICE publications: Completed appraisals • National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2001) Guidance on the use of taxanes for the treatment of breast cancer. NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance No. 30. London: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (...) , such as Herceptin and new generations of hormonal agents are important and need not be replicated in this guidance. The success of the Cancer Services Collaborative in improving specific aspects of service delivery at local level has been influential, and published evidence on good practice is an important new source of material. One of the important ways in which this guidance is used reflects a greater concern with implementation. Recommendations from the original breast guidance were incorporated

2002 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

10663. Breast fine needle aspiration cytology and core biopsy - a guide for practice

: a guide for practice, National Breast Cancer Centre, Camperdown, NSW . Copies of this book can be ordered through: The National Breast Cancer Centre:Telephone 1800 624 973 This book can also be downloaded from the National Breast Cancer Centre website www.nbcc.org.au 2663J NBCC FNA Guide 23/12/04 1:26 PM Page iiCONTENTS Acknowledgements iv Foreword v Abbreviations vi Key recommendations vii Introduction 1 Chapter 1 General principles of investigation 5 Chapter 2 Indications for FNA cytology and core (...) and method of detection (clinically detected or image- detected) also influence reliability. The relative advantages of FNA cytology, compared with core biopsy, include: • the sampling procedure for FNA cytology is quicker to perform than core biopsy • in most instances FNA cytology does not require local anaesthetic • FNA cytology is generally less traumatic than core biopsy and may be more appropriate for women taking anticoagulant medication • FNA cytology is associated with a low complication rate

2004 Cancer Australia

10664. The clinical management of ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical hyperplasia of the breast

of Cancer ER oestrogen receptor FNAB fine needle aspiration biopsy GP general practitioner Gy Gray (unit of radiation dosage) HR hazard ratio HRT hormone replacement therapy IBIS International Breast Cancer Intervention Study IBT ipsilateral breast tumour IBTR ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence LCIS lobular carcinoma in situ NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council NSABP National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project RFS recurrence-free survival VNPI Van Nuys Prognostic Index (...) . The suggested citation for this document is: National Breast Cancer Centre. 2003. The clinical management of ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma in situ and atypical hyperplasia of the breast, first edition. National Breast Cancer Centre, Camperdown, NSW . Copies of this book can be ordered through: The National Breast Cancer Centre: Telephone 1800 624 973 This book can also be downloaded from the National Breast Cancer Centre website www.nbcc.org.auCONTENTS List of tables and figures iii Foreword v

2003 Cancer Australia

10665. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of women with epithelial ovarian cancer

leadership and work with other relevant organisations to improve the health of all Australians by: • fostering and supporting a high quality and internationally recognised research base; • providing evidence based advice; • applying research evidence to health issues thus translating research into better health practice and outcomes; and • promoting informed debate on health and medical research, health ethics and related issues. This document is a general guide to appropriate practice, to be followed (...) collaboratively with the Australian Cancer Network to develop, revise and complete the guidelines. The working party comprised representatives from the disciplines of: • Gynaecological Oncology • Medical Oncology • Pathology • Radiation Oncology • Nursing • General Practice • Epidemiology; and • Consumers The Clinical practice guidelines for the management of women with epithelial ovarian cancer, aim to: • improve the quality of healthcare for women; • educate those involved in the care of women

2004 Cancer Australia

10666. Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer

in the treatment unit and evidence to support their implementation 38 3.1 General interactional skills 42 3.2.1 Recommended steps for telling a person they have cancer, a recurrence or metastases 45 3.2.2 Recommended steps for discussing prognosis with individuals with cancer 50 3.2.3 Recommended steps for discussing treatment options and encouraging involvement in decision-making 62 3.2.4 Recommended steps involved in adequately preparing a patient for a potentially threatening medical procedure 64 3.2.5 (...) oncologists, medical oncologists, general practitioners, nurses, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. While most aspects of psychosocial care are common to all cancers, there are some aspects that will be relevant to specific cancers and to specific stages of treatment. It is recognised that while some aspects of psychosocial care are common to all the health professionals involved in a patient’s treatment and care, different members of the treatment

2003 National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre

10668. A systematic review of the evidence for incentive schemes to encourage positive health and other social behaviours in young people

with other systematic review evidence. We found no evidence that single or dual component incentive schemes are effective in improving either the levels of effort applied to educational tests or attendance levels in school. Overall single or dual component incentive schemes do not appear to offer policy- makers or practitioners a simple route to ensuring general positive behaviour changes in young people. However, they may be useful in particular settings and for particular groups. Process evaluations (...) or another can encourage young people to adopt healthy and prosocial behaviours. This interest is driven by a long-term policy concern that improving population health in part depends on the willingness, and ability, of people to choose health-enhancing behaviours (Department of Health, 1996). The general pattern of health inequalities may be partly explained by differences in these behaviours, which are in turn closely related to structural and material inequalities (Acheson, 1998). Health-related

2006 EPPI Centre

10669. Scoping review on evaluation of Healthy Start

by repeated cross-sectional or longitudinal surveys and, in most cases, available in the form of complete datasets on the UK Data Archive website B Data collected on the general population or in specific settings and, in most cases, available on various websites C Data collected as part of routine care, but not readily accessible at the individual level, unless one is involved in the routine care Initial results suggested that routine data sources may have the potential to be useful for collection (...) identified important issues related to programme evaluation and, particularly routine data collection, in general: Consideration of evaluation options is best done before programmes are put in place; this is likely to result in more robust designs and more accurate assessment of impact. We found no relevant datasets in which a priori sample size calculations had been conducted for specific population groups of interest. Such considerations at the planning stage of routine data collection would enhance

2007 Public Health Research Consortium

10670. Shiftwork and health: a systematic review

amongst shift workers were 6 reported to have positive health, wellbeing and economic effects. Generally, health and wellbeing may be more likely to be improved by interventions which involved workers in their design and implementation. Considerations/issues for policy Changing the organisation of work can have positive health and wellbeing effects: The review suggests that certain interventions (particularly CWW, slow to fast rotation, backward to forward rotation, or self-scheduling) which change (...) types of work patterning on health and health inequalities, and in particular there is a large body of evidence spanning several decades, which describes the negative effects of shift work on health and wellbeing.[17, 18] Reported health problems include sleep disturbances, fatigue, digestive problems, emotional problems and stress-related illnesses, as well as increases in general morbidity, and in sickness absence.[19] These problems may derive from disruption to physiological, psychological

2006 Public Health Research Consortium

10671. Statement on Fatigue and the Anaesthetist

must have knowledge of fatigue related risk categories, as set out in the Australian Medical Association National Code of Practice (March 1999) (28) . Anaesthetists have a moral and ethical responsibility to consider not proceeding with clinical duties if physical or mental fatigue, stress or ill health, alone or in combination, might interfere with safe patient care. 2. When working out-of-hours results in significant disturbance to normal rest and sleep, the anaesthetist should ensure that any (...) , and psychomotor vigilance decrements during a week of sleep restricted to 4-5 hours per night. Sleep 1997; 20: 267-277. (13) Dinges DF, Graeber CR. Crew Fatigue Monitoring. Flight Safety Digest; October 1989. 65-75 (14) http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/pubs/books/nightshift/index.asp (accessed May 2007) (15) Dement WC, Seidel WF, Cohen SA, Bliwise NG, Carkadon MA. Sleep and wakefulness in aircrew before and after transoceanic flights. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 1986; 57: B14-B28. (16) Van Dongen HA

2007 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

10672. Antiepileptic drug prophylaxis in severe traumatic brain injury

M, Klebs K, Baltzer V. Inhibition or enhancement of kindling evolution by antiepileptics. J Neural Transm . 1988; 72 : 245 –257. Goldstein LB. Prescribing of potentially harmful drugs to patients admitted to hospital after head injury. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry . 1995; 58 : 753 –755. Jennett B. Epilepsy after non-missile head injuries. Chicago, IL: William Heinemann Medical Books, 1975. Temkin NR, Haglund MM, Winn HR. Post-traumatic seizures. In: Youmans JR, ed. Neurological surgery, 4th ed (...) the prophylactic use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI is a common neurologic disorder, accounting for about 1.1 million emergency department visits and one hospitalization per 1,000 people each year in the United States. Among all patients with head trauma who seek medical attention, about 2% develop post-traumatic seizures, although the number varies widely depending primarily on injury severity. About 12% of patients with severe TBI develop post

2003 American Academy of Neurology

10673. Neuroprotective strategies and alternative therapies for parkinson disease

or nonpharmacologic therapies that have been shown to improve motor function in PD? Description of the analytical process. The QSS of the American Academy of Neurology identified five movement disorder specialists and a general neurologist with methodologic expertise. For the literature review, the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for the years 1997–2002. Only articles written in English were included. A second MEDLINE search covered 1966 (...) a diminished rate of loss of these neurons. Currently, measurement of neurons can only be done postmortem, and even then, determining rate of decline poses a challenge. As direct visualization during the patient’s life would be optimal, but is not possible at the present time, surrogate markers that are thought to reflect nigrostriatal neuron counts need to be employed. Potential clinical surrogate markers include ratings of motor impairment, general disability, quality of life measures, and time

2006 American Academy of Neurology

10674. Statement on Fatigue and the Anaesthetist

must have knowledge of fatigue related risk categories, as set out in the Australian Medical Association National Code of Practice (March 1999) (28) . Anaesthetists have a moral and ethical responsibility to consider not proceeding with clinical duties if physical or mental fatigue, stress or ill health, alone or in combination, might interfere with safe patient care. 2. When working out-of-hours results in significant disturbance to normal rest and sleep, the anaesthetist should ensure that any (...) , and psychomotor vigilance decrements during a week of sleep restricted to 4-5 hours per night. Sleep 1997; 20: 267-277. (13) Dinges DF, Graeber CR. Crew Fatigue Monitoring. Flight Safety Digest; October 1989. 65-75 (14) http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/pubs/books/nightshift/index.asp (accessed May 2007) (15) Dement WC, Seidel WF, Cohen SA, Bliwise NG, Carkadon MA. Sleep and wakefulness in aircrew before and after transoceanic flights. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine. 1986; 57: B14-B28. (16) Van Dongen HA

2007 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

10675. Guidelines for the management of primary cutaneous T-cell lympohomas

to the management of primary CTCL, and speci?cally of mycosis fungoides and Se ´zary syndrome. Two sections devoted to primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders and rare CTCL variants are found towards the end of the article. It is recommended that all patients, possibly with the excep- tion of those with early stages of mycosis fungoides (IA) or with lymphomatoid papulosis, should be reviewed by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) which should include a dermatologist, a clinical or medical (haemato (...) of a peripheral blood T-cell clone; some mycosis fungoides clinical variants may have a better prognosis d In Se ´zary syndrome the median survival is 32 months from diagnosis d Primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative dis- orders without peripheral nodal disease have an excellent prognosis (range 96–100% 5-year survival) d The prognosis of other types of CTCL is generally poor with the frequent development of systemic disease. (Grade A/ level IIii) Therapy Topical therapy For patients with limited early

2003 British Association of Dermatologists

10676. Developing and Sustaining Effective Staffing and Workload Practices

and organizations that are making our vision for HWE BPGs a reality. To the Government of Ontario and Health Canada for recognizing RNAO’s ability to lead this program and providing generous funding. To Donna Tucker – Program Director from 2003 to 2005, and Irmajean Bajnok – Director, Centre for Professional Nursing Excellence and the program’s lead since 2005, for providing wisdom and working intensely to advance the production of these HWE BPGs. To Pauline Matthews, HWE Program Assistant for the endless hours (...) of unwavering support and committed work. To each and all HWE BPG leaders and in particular, for this BPG, Panel Co-Chairs Linda O’Brien-Pallas, Donna Thomson and Phyllis Giovannetti, and Panel Coordinator Val Coubrough, for providing superb stewardship, commitment and above all exquisite expertise. Thanks also go to the amazing Panel Members who generously contributed their time and knowledge. We could not have delivered such a quality resource without you! We thank in advance the entire nursing community

2007 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

10677. BPG for the Subcutaneous Administration of Insulin in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

and family obligations, dealing with common illnesses, taking medications, and living with the fears and realities of long-term complications and daily hyper- or hypoglycemia. Symptoms of both depression and anxiety are more commonly found in people with diabetes than in the general population, however, it is not yet clear whether these conditions increase with the use of insulin therapy (CDA, 2003a; Rubin & Peyrot, 2001). Depression can interfere with concentration, energy levels, and the ability (...) , Ontario Lynne LaFrance, RN, HBScN Diabetes Nurse Educator Geraldton Diabetes Education Centre Geraldton, Ontario Carolyn Lawton, RN, MScN, CDE Nurse Practitioner, Endocrinology Sunnybrook & Women’s College Health Sciences Centre Toronto, Ontario Freda Leung, BScPhm, CDE Clinical Pharmacist Scarborough Hospital, General Division Toronto, Ontario Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe, MD, FRCPC Clinical Associate Endocrinology & Metabolism Sunnybrook & Women’s College Health Sciences Centre Toronto, Ontario Donna

2004 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

10678. Reducing Foot Complications for People with Diabetes

, CRRN Clinical Nurse The Rehabilitation Centre Ottawa, Ontario Yvonne Harvey, RPN Private Practice Ottawa, Ontario Hazel Hoogkamp, RN, CDE Diabetes Education Centre Woodstock General Hospital Woodstock, Ontario Robert Hunks, BSc, DCh Chiropodist Brantford, Ontario Dr. David Keast, MSc, MD, CCFP , FCFP Medical Director, Chronic Wound Management Clinic Parkwood Hospital St. Joseph’s Health Care London, Ontario Ester Kuh, RN KCI Medical Canada, Inc. Mississauga, Ontario Sally Lewis, RN, CDE Coordinator (...) North Bay General Hospital North Bay, Ontario Judy Costello, RN, MScN Director of Nursing – Toronto General Hospital University Health Network Toronto, Ontario Darlean Coulter Canadian Diabetes Association – Tri-County Branch Brockville, Ontario Cheryl Colborne, RN, CDE Diabetes Educator Windsor Regional Hospital Windsor, Ontario Ruth Collins Client Focus Group Windsor, Ontario Community Care Access Centre Agency Representative Ontario Dr. Timothy Daniels, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor University

2004 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

10679. Assessment and Management of Venous Leg Ulcers

Elaine Diebold Enterostomal Therapy Nurse Durham, Ontario Geneviève Grégoire Dietetic Intern Moncton, New Brunswick Connie Harris Enterostomal Therapist/Consultant Kitchener, Ontario Cheri Hernandez Associate Professor Faculty of Nursing University of Windsor Windsor, Ontario Dr. Pamela Houghton Associate Professor School of Physiotherapy University of Western Ontario London, Ontario Madge Legrace Registered Nurse Unionville, Ontario Dr. Ronald Mahler Dermatologist Thunder Bay Medical Centre Thunder (...) Bay, Ontario Stephanie McIntosh Consumer Marie-Andre Meloche Victorian Order of Nurses – Peel Mississauga, Ontario Beverly Monette Clinical Nurse Consultant Dell Pharmacy, Home Health Care Centre Hamilton, Ontario 4 Assessment and Management of Venous Leg UlcersSue Morrell-DeVries Nurse Coordinator, Vascular Surgery Toronto General Hospital Toronto, Ontario Dr. Gary Sibbald Director of Dermatology Day Care and Wound Healing Clinic Sunnybrook & Women’s College Health Sciences Centre Associate

2004 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

10680. Collaborative Practice Among Nursing Teams Guideline

for HWE BPGs a reality . T o the Government of Ontario and Health Canada for recognizing RNAO’s ability to lead this program and providing generous funding. To Donna Tucker – Program Director from 2003 to 2005, and Irmajean Bajnok – Director, Centre for Professional Nursing Excellence and the program’s lead since 2005, for providing wisdom and working intensely to advance the production of these HWE BPGs. To each and all HWE BPG leaders and in particular, for this BPG, Panel Co-Chairs Diane Doran (...) and Leslie Vincent and Panel Coordinator Val Coubrough, for providing superb stewardship, commitment and above all exquisite expertise. Thanks also go to the amazing Panel Members who generously contributed their time and knowledge. We could not have delivered such a quality resource without you! We thank in advance the entire nursing community , committed and passionate about excellence in nursing care and healthy work environments, who will now adopt these BPGs and implement them in their worksites. We

2006 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

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