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481 results for

Gag Reflex

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461. Randomized, double-blind trial of midazolam and diazepam for endoscopic sedation in children. (Abstract)

Randomized, double-blind trial of midazolam and diazepam for endoscopic sedation in children. We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of 41 children (6-18 years of age) who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) to compare the efficacy of diazepam and midazolam with respect to quality of sedation and amnesia. The endoscopist assessed the patients for control of salivation, gag reflex, vomiting and cooperation after intravenous injection of either 0.1-0.15 mg/kg

1990 Developmental pharmacology and therapeutics Controlled trial quality: uncertain

462. Suppression of hemodynamic change before extubation--lidocaine through modified endotracheal tube. (Abstract)

than those recorded in group II (p less than 0.01). All patients had gag reflex just after awake extubation.

1990 Ma zui xue za zhi = Anaesthesiologica Sinica Controlled trial quality: uncertain

463. Anesthetic effect of EMLA occluded with Orahesive oral bandages on oral mucosa. A placebo-controlled study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA). No significant change in pain perception was obtained after placebo application. The EMLA cream and the Orahesive Oral Bandages were well accepted by the subjects, as only two out of 20 subjects experienced slight gagging reflexes and only three considered the taste unpleasant. No other adverse reactions were observed. Occlusion of topical anesthetics seems to be a useful technique for achieving superficial mucosal anesthesia.

1992 Anesthesia progress Controlled trial quality: uncertain

464. Comparison of lower concentrations of lidocaine to suppress bucking before extubation during recovery of general anesthesia. (Abstract)

in the awakening group I patients were 49.0 +/- 2.5 cmH2 O (mean +/- SD) which shows greater than that in group II (27.9 +/- 7.2 cmH2 O), p less than 0.01. Bucking before awakening was also evaluated clinically. One hundred % (15/15) in group I patients bucked compared with 13.3% (2/15) in group II patients (p less than 0.01). Gag reflex was preserved in all patients and none suffered from aspiration postoperatively. Intratracheal administration of two mL 2% lidocaine through the catheter of modified

1990 Ma zui xue za zhi = Anaesthesiologica Sinica Controlled trial quality: uncertain

465. Midazolam premedication improves tolerance of transesophageal echocardiography. (Abstract)

to 200 consecutive in- and outpatients. Blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored. Patients were interviewed immediately, and 2 to 10 days after TEE. Sixteen patients received an additional dose of midazolam, and in 12 follow-up was incomplete. Patients taking midazolam reported less gag reflex at probe introduction and during TEE, as did the examiners (p < 0.05 to 0.0001). Probe manipulations were found to produce less discomfort after midazolam administration (p < 0.005

1998 The American journal of cardiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

466. Use of colchicine to treat severe constipation in developmentally disabled patients. (Abstract)

Use of colchicine to treat severe constipation in developmentally disabled patients. Patients with severe developmental disabilities often have concurrent decreased neuromuscular tone of the gastrointestinal tract, which can lead to a weak gag reflex, esophageal reflux, aspiration, and severe intractable constipation. High doses of multiple laxatives are frequently needed to maintain bowel motility in these patients. Colchicine, a natural alkaloid that is primarily used for the treatment

1998 The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice / American Board of Family Practice Controlled trial quality: uncertain

467. Comparison of the reinforced laryngeal mask airway and tracheal intubation for adenotonsillectomy. (Abstract)

patients were withdrawn from the laryngeal mask airway group: two because difficulty with placement, and two because the laryngeal mask was obstructed distally when the Boyle Davis gag was opened fully. In children, recovery was less eventful in the laryngeal mask airway group, with less airway obstruction (P < 0.001) and better airway acceptance (P < 0.05). The reinforced laryngeal mask airway provided a clear, secure airway until recovery of protective reflexes.

1993 British Journal of Anaesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

468. Laryngeal mask insertion during target-controlled infusion of propofol. (Abstract)

conditions (mouth opening, gagging, coughing, head or limb movement, laryngospasm, overall ease of insertion) were assessed, and hemodynamic responses were evaluated until 3 minutes after LMA insertion. Total dose of propofol, EC, and elapsed time since the start of TCI were recorded at five times: at the loss of consciousness and eyelash reflex, at 2.5 microg/mL of EC, and immediately, 1 minute, and 3 minutes after the insertion of LMA.There was no significant difference between the two groups

2001 Journal of clinical anesthesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

469. Co-administration of alfentanil-propofol improves laryngeal mask airway insertion compared to fentanyl-propofol. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Co-administration of alfentanil-propofol improves laryngeal mask airway insertion compared to fentanyl-propofol. Insertion of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) requires sufficient depth of anesthesia to relax the jaw and obtund airway reflexes. Recent studies suggest that the short-acting opioid alfentanil provides the best insertion conditions. We therefore compared the insertion conditions following co-administration of alfentanil-propofol with more commonly used fentanyl-propofol.One hundred (...) was recorded. Insertion conditions were compared using Chi-square for trends.The two groups were demographically similar. Mouth opening and ease of insertion were not improved with alfentanil co-administration. Alfentanil-propofol reduced the incidence of swallowing, gagging, movement and laryngospasm (P < 0.05), with 29% (alfentanil) compared to 45% (fentanyl) of patients responding (P = 0.05) to LMA insertion. Apnea [mean (SD)] following alfentanil lasted 154 (139) sec compared to 82 (61) sec following

2002 Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie Controlled trial quality: uncertain

470. Drug-assisted effects on protective airway reflexes during out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation (preliminary report). (Abstract)

and DAI success.We analyzed data from a prospective multicenter trial. Rescuers from 42 emergency medical services systems reported clinical ETI data using standardized reporting forms. We analyzed the subset receiving sedative and/or neuromuscular blocking agents to facilitate ETI. We defined successful ETI as intratracheal placement of the endotracheal tube on the last ETI attempt. Rescuers reported the presence and ablation of six protective airway reflexes, including the presence of a gag, trismus (...) , inadequate relaxation, combativeness, laryngospasm, and seizure/myoclonus. We examined the relationship between protective reflex ablation and DAI success.Of 1,953 ETIs, 208 (10.7%) used DAI (128 sedation only, 80 neuromuscular blocking agents/rapid sequence intubation). Successful DAI was associated with ablation of gag reflex (odds ratio [OR], 12.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.7 to 46.2), clenched jaw/trismus (OR, 54.4; 95% CI, 11.1 to 292.4), inadequate relaxation (OR, 16.3; 95% CI, 3.7 to 96.4

2006 Prehospital emergency care

471. The use of acupuncture in controlling the gag reflex in patients requiring an upper alginate impression: an audit. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The use of acupuncture in controlling the gag reflex in patients requiring an upper alginate impression: an audit. A pronounced gag reflex (GR) can be a problem to both the acceptance and delivery of dental treatment. Despite a range of management strategies, some patients cannot accept even simple dental treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of acupuncture point CV-24 in controlling a profound gag reflex during dental treatment requiring an upper alginate impression.Members (...) of the British Dental Acupuncture Society were invited to take part in an audit of the role of acupuncture point CV-24 in controlling the gag reflex. They were issued with patient inclusion criteria, a standardised procedure instruction sheet and a recording form. All patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria had an upper dental alginate impression taken (or an attempt made at it) before acupuncture, and a second upper alginate impression taken immediately after acupuncture of point CV-24. The GR assessment

2006 British Dental Journal

472. Altering the gag reflex via a palm pressure point. (Abstract)

Altering the gag reflex via a palm pressure point. The gag reflex regularly interferes with dental procedures. The authors hypothesize that applying pressure to a specific point on the palm alters the gag reflex and that hypersensitive gag reflexes may be categorized according to oropharyngeal landmarks.Thirty-six neurologically intact subjects underwent a series of gag reflex trials (baseline, sham and treatment). The authors developed a hand pressure device for subjects to wear, which (...) provided a consistent force, and they described a gag trigger point index (GTPI) scale. On the basis of the GTPI, they divided subjects into a hypersensitive group and an expected-sensitivity (control) group.The trigger point of the gag reflex moved posteriorly in all subjects as a result of pressure to the palm point. Statistical results from repeated measures analysis of variance support the GTPI baseline data, and group assignments helped predict mean GTPI scores across conditions. The authors noted

2008 Journal of the American Dental Association

473. Magnetic resonance imaging evidence of posterior pharynx denervation in pediatric patients with Chiari I malformation and absent gag reflex. (Abstract)

Magnetic resonance imaging evidence of posterior pharynx denervation in pediatric patients with Chiari I malformation and absent gag reflex. The authors hypothesized that children with preoperative Chiari I malformation and an absent gag reflex may harbor pharyngeal musculature atrophy identifiable on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging.Thirty patients with preoperative Chiari I malformation and a functioning gag reflex, five patients with preoperative Chiari I malformation and complete absence (...) of gag reflex, and 50 control individuals underwent radiological measurement of the posterior pharyngeal wall thickness. The thickness of the posterior pharyngeal wall in age-matched controls was significantly thinner (p < 0.0001) than that in patients with Chiari I malformation and no functioning gag reflex. Additionally, in patients with hindbrain herniation and absent gag reflex, the posterior pharyngeal wall thicknesses were comparable to or thinner than those in age-matched controls. A general

2004 Journal of Neurosurgery

474. The effects of glossopharyngeal nerve block on postoperative pain relief after tonsillectomy: the importance of the extent of obtunded gag reflex as a clinical indicator. (Abstract)

The effects of glossopharyngeal nerve block on postoperative pain relief after tonsillectomy: the importance of the extent of obtunded gag reflex as a clinical indicator. We evaluated the efficacy of glossopharyngeal nerve block (GNB) for the control of post-tonsillectomy pain in adult patients, and correlated the extent of obtunded gag reflex as a clinical indicator of GNB with the extent of pain relief.Seventy-five patients undergoing tonsillectomy received bilateral GNB with 0.75 (...) % ropivacaine with epinephrine (Group R), 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine (Group B) at the end of the operation, or no intervention (Group C). To evaluate the effects of GNB, we assessed throat pain (100 mm visual analog scale) and severity of gag reflex response 0.5, 8, and 24 h after surgery.In the immediate postoperative period, pain scores at rest and when swallowing in Groups R and B were significantly lower than those in Group C (21 +/- 17 and 23 +/- 13 vs 42 +/- 16, 28 +/- 22 and 32 +/- 19 vs 62

2007 Anesthesia and analgesia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

475. Relation between Glasgow coma scale and the gag reflex. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Relation between Glasgow coma scale and the gag reflex. 1747645 1992 01 22 2018 11 13 0959-8138 303 6812 1991 Nov 16 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Relation between Glasgow coma scale and the gag reflex. 1240-1 Moulton C C Accident and Emergency Department, Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Pennycook A A Makower R R eng Comparative Study Journal Article England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1991 Nov 30;303(6814):1401 1760613 Airway Obstruction diagnosis Consciousness physiology Emergencies Gagging

1991 BMJ : British Medical Journal

476. Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. 1760613 1992 02 12 2018 11 13 0959-8138 303 6814 1991 Nov 30 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. 1401 Stanners A J AJ eng Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1992 Jan 18;304(6820):185 1737172 BMJ. 1991 Nov 16;303(6812):1240-1 1747645 Airway Obstruction diagnosis Cerebrovascular Disorders physiopathology Gagging Humans 1991 11 30 1991 11 30 0 1 1991 11 30 0 0 ppublish 1760613 PMC1671609 Neurology. 1988 Sep;38

1991 BMJ : British Medical Journal

477. Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. 1737172 1992 03 18 2018 11 13 0959-8138 304 6820 1992 Jan 18 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Glasgow coma scale and gag reflex. 185 Moulton C C Pennycook A G AG eng Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1991 Nov 30;303(6814):1401 1760613 Airway Obstruction diagnosis Gagging Glasgow Coma Scale Humans Reflex 1992 1 18 1992 1 18 0 1 1992 1 18 0 0 ppublish 1737172 PMC1881180 BMJ. 1991 Nov 30;303(6814):1401 1760613 BMJ. 1991 Nov 16;303(6812):1240

1992 BMJ : British Medical Journal

478. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding after acute dysphagic stroke. Gag reflex has no role in ability to swallow. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding after acute dysphagic stroke. Gag reflex has no role in ability to swallow. 8616318 1996 06 07 2018 11 13 0959-8138 312 7036 1996 Apr 13 BMJ (Clinical research ed.) BMJ Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding after acute dysphagic stroke. Gag reflex has no role in ability to swallow. 972; author reply 973-4 Smithard D G DG eng Comment Letter England BMJ 8900488 0959-8138 AIM IM BMJ. 1996 Jan 6;312(7022):13-6 8555849 Cerebrovascular Disorders (...) complications Deglutition Deglutition Disorders etiology therapy Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal Enteral Nutrition Gagging Gastrostomy Humans 1996 4 13 1996 4 13 0 1 1996 4 13 0 0 ppublish 8616318 PMC2350745 Neurology. 1988 Feb;38(2):317-9 3340301 Lancet. 1995 Feb 25;345(8948):487-8 7861875 BMJ. 1996 Jan 6;312(7022):13-6 8555849

1996 BMJ : British Medical Journal

479. Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Gag reflex and intubation. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Gag reflex and intubation. 10572821 1999 12 08 2018 11 13 1351-0622 16 6 1999 Nov Journal of accident & emergency medicine J Accid Emerg Med Towards evidence based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Gag reflex and intubation. 444-5 Mackway-Jones K K Moulton C C eng Journal Article England J Accid Emerg Med 9433751 1351-0622 IM Adult Emergencies Emergency Medical Services (...) Evidence-Based Medicine Gagging Glasgow Coma Scale Humans Intubation, Intratracheal Sensitivity and Specificity 1999 11 26 1999 11 26 0 1 1999 11 26 0 0 ppublish 10572821 PMC1343414 BMJ. 1991 Jul 27;303(6796):240-2 1884064 Lancet. 1995 Feb 25;345(8948):487-8 7861875 J Emerg Med. 1993 Sep-Oct;11(5):579-82 8308236

1999 Journal of accident & emergency medicine

480. The effect of neuroleptic and antiparkinsonian medication on the gag reflex. (Abstract)

The effect of neuroleptic and antiparkinsonian medication on the gag reflex. A polygraph assessment of medicated psychiatric patients suggests anticholinergic effects are the primary cause of a diminished gag reflex. Sex differences indicate that females are relatively protected.

1991 Schizophrenia research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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