How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

62 results for

Functional Aphonia

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

21. Diagnosis and Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

) had an increase in time off work and decrease in work productivity. Low scores on sleep scales were seen compared with patients with less frequent symptoms. A decrease in physical functioning was also seen ( 10 ). Nocturnal GERD has a greater impact on QOL compared with daytime symptoms. Both nocturnal symptoms and sleep disturbances are critical to eluci- date when evaluating the GERD patient ( 11 ). Th e balance of evidence suggests that symptom frequency does not change as we age, however (...) in this asso- ciation ( 123 ). Cohort studies suggest that GERD may be the cause in 21 – 41 % o f c hr o nic no n s p e cifi c cough ( 124 ). A large V A popula- tion case – control study found increased odds ratios for pharyngi- tis (OR 1.60), aphonia (OR 1.81), and chronic laryngitis (OR 2.01) in cases with esophagitis or esophageal stricture compared with controls ( 125 ). Th e Montreal Consensus recognized established associations between GERD and asthma, chronic cough, and laryngitis, while

2013 American College of Gastroenterology

22. Hoarseness

. Epidemiology Hoarseness is common, with a point as high as 7% for those <65 years old III. Pathophysiology Abnormal voice production (change in pitch, loudness or effort) Breathiness Harsh, rough or raspy voice Lack of smooth vocal cord approximation Laryngeal pathology Abnormal vocal cord mobility Usually caused by organic disorder (not functional) IV. Causes See V. Symptoms Abnormal voice quality (e.g. Breathy, Strained, Raspy, Weak) VI. History See VII. Evaluation: Laryngoscopy Indications (see (...) of the mucosa leading to VOICE DISORDERS such as APHONIA and HOARSENESS. Definition (CHV) an inflammation of the larynx (voice box) generally associated with hoarseness or loss of voice Definition (MSHCZE) Zánět hrtanu. Probíhá samostatně nebo častěji jako součást zánětu horních cest dýchacích. Nejčastěji má virový původ, ale může být způsobena i bakteriemi a zevními vlivy (dráždivé plyny, inverzní l. aj.). Projevuje se chrapotem až ztrátou hlasu (afonií) a kašlem. V těžkých případech, zejm. u malých dětí

2018 FP Notebook

23. Neurological History and Physical Examination (Overview)

Neurological History and Physical Examination (Overview) Neurological History and Physical Examination: Neurological History, Neurologic Examination, Examination of the Higher Functions Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) , if possible.) Radiation (Pay attention to any dermatomal relationship.) Quality (stabbing, stinging, lightninglike, pounding, etc) Severity or quantity (Estimate functional limitation.) Precipitating factors (stress, periods, allergens, sleep deprivation, etc) Relieving factors (sleep, stress management, etc) Diurnal or seasonal variation Important miscellaneous factors of the history include the following: Results of previous attempts to diagnose the condition Any previous therapeutic intervention

2014 eMedicine.com

24. Enteroviruses (Overview)

and weakness or paralysis of one or more extremities, along with weakness of one or more muscle groups Spinal polio comprises a prolonged prodrome, with features of aseptic meningitis followed in 1-2 days by weakness and, eventually, paralysis Bulbar polio involves cranial nerves, most commonly IX, X, and XII; patients accumulate pharyngeal secretions, have a nasal twang to the voice, and develop paralysis of vocal cords, causing hoarseness, aphonia, and, eventually, asphyxia Polioencephalitis (...) reduce poliovirus shedding; higher secretory IgA titers lead to better immunity. [ ] Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies appear as early as 1-3 days after enteroviral challenge and disappear after 2-3 months. [ ] Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, which is generally detected 7-10 days after infection, is mostly of the IgG 1 and IgG 3 subtypes. Serum neutralizing IgG antibodies persist for life after natural enteroviral infections. [ ] Macrophage function is also a critical component of the immune

2014 eMedicine.com

25. Vocal Fold Cysts

complete aphonia, a significant functional component can be expected. Cysts rarely cause symptoms of stridor, aspiration, globus sensation, or . This patient had an essentially normal speaking voice but complained of fatigue and loss of vocal range. Note the translucent quality of the mucosal cover. Patients may be hoarse or may have normal speaking voices. Patients in the latter group often exhibit difficulty with the singing voice, including decreased range, easy fatigability, strain, and periods (...) . Generally, patients with intracordal lesions have dysphonia that becomes more severe with use. They may also describe periods of aphonia following vocal overuse. Sometimes a vocal fold cyst can affect only the singing voice and not the speaking voice or have little or no effect on voice quality. In the latter situation, no indication exists for treatment. However, for a patient to have a normal speaking and singing voice is not unusual, and a patient may be able to perform. When a patient reports

2014 eMedicine Surgery

26. Communication Disorders (Follow-up)

the voice’s quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , ] Another type of communication problem, dysarthria, encompasses a group of motor speech disorders caused by a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of speech. [ ] A second form of motor speech disorder, apraxia, occurs in the presence of significant weakness or incoordination of the muscles (...) (complexity). By varying the pitch, loudness, rate, and rhythm of voice (prosody), the speaker can convey additional meaning and emotion to words. A voice disorder exists when the quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , , ] Organic dysphonia Organic disorders cause an interruption in the smooth approximation of the vocal folds. [ ] Such disorders

2014 eMedicine.com

27. Conversion Disorders (Diagnosis)

09, 2015 Author: Scott A Marshall, MD; Chief Editor: David Bienenfeld, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Conversion Disorders Overview Background Conversion disorder (Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder) is categorized under the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) category of Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders. [ ] It involves symptoms or deficits affecting voluntary motor or sensory function that suggest a neurologic (...) or other general medical condition. Yet, following a thorough evaluation, which includes a detailed neurologic examination and appropriate laboratory and radiographic diagnostic tests, no neurologic explanation exists for the symptoms, or the examination findings are inconsistent with the complaint. In other words, symptoms of an organic medical disorder or disturbance in normal neurologic functioning exist that are not referable to an organic medical or neurologic cause. [ ] Common examples

2014 eMedicine.com

28. Enteroviruses (Diagnosis)

and weakness or paralysis of one or more extremities, along with weakness of one or more muscle groups Spinal polio comprises a prolonged prodrome, with features of aseptic meningitis followed in 1-2 days by weakness and, eventually, paralysis Bulbar polio involves cranial nerves, most commonly IX, X, and XII; patients accumulate pharyngeal secretions, have a nasal twang to the voice, and develop paralysis of vocal cords, causing hoarseness, aphonia, and, eventually, asphyxia Polioencephalitis (...) reduce poliovirus shedding; higher secretory IgA titers lead to better immunity. [ ] Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies appear as early as 1-3 days after enteroviral challenge and disappear after 2-3 months. [ ] Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, which is generally detected 7-10 days after infection, is mostly of the IgG 1 and IgG 3 subtypes. Serum neutralizing IgG antibodies persist for life after natural enteroviral infections. [ ] Macrophage function is also a critical component of the immune

2014 eMedicine.com

29. Communication Disorders (Diagnosis)

the voice’s quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , ] Another type of communication problem, dysarthria, encompasses a group of motor speech disorders caused by a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of speech. [ ] A second form of motor speech disorder, apraxia, occurs in the presence of significant weakness or incoordination of the muscles (...) (complexity). By varying the pitch, loudness, rate, and rhythm of voice (prosody), the speaker can convey additional meaning and emotion to words. A voice disorder exists when the quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , , ] Organic dysphonia Organic disorders cause an interruption in the smooth approximation of the vocal folds. [ ] Such disorders

2014 eMedicine.com

30. Communication Disorders (Treatment)

the voice’s quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , ] Another type of communication problem, dysarthria, encompasses a group of motor speech disorders caused by a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of speech. [ ] A second form of motor speech disorder, apraxia, occurs in the presence of significant weakness or incoordination of the muscles (...) (complexity). By varying the pitch, loudness, rate, and rhythm of voice (prosody), the speaker can convey additional meaning and emotion to words. A voice disorder exists when the quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , , ] Organic dysphonia Organic disorders cause an interruption in the smooth approximation of the vocal folds. [ ] Such disorders

2014 eMedicine.com

31. Neurological History and Physical Examination (Treatment)

Neurological History and Physical Examination (Treatment) Neurological History and Physical Examination: Neurological History, Neurologic Examination, Examination of the Higher Functions Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) , if possible.) Radiation (Pay attention to any dermatomal relationship.) Quality (stabbing, stinging, lightninglike, pounding, etc) Severity or quantity (Estimate functional limitation.) Precipitating factors (stress, periods, allergens, sleep deprivation, etc) Relieving factors (sleep, stress management, etc) Diurnal or seasonal variation Important miscellaneous factors of the history include the following: Results of previous attempts to diagnose the condition Any previous therapeutic intervention

2014 eMedicine.com

32. Conversion Disorders (Overview)

, 2015 Author: Scott A Marshall, MD; Chief Editor: David Bienenfeld, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Conversion Disorders Overview Background Conversion disorder (Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder) is categorized under the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) category of Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders. [ ] It involves symptoms or deficits affecting voluntary motor or sensory function that suggest a neurologic or other (...) general medical condition. Yet, following a thorough evaluation, which includes a detailed neurologic examination and appropriate laboratory and radiographic diagnostic tests, no neurologic explanation exists for the symptoms, or the examination findings are inconsistent with the complaint. In other words, symptoms of an organic medical disorder or disturbance in normal neurologic functioning exist that are not referable to an organic medical or neurologic cause. [ ] Common examples of conversion

2014 eMedicine.com

33. Communication Disorders (Overview)

the voice’s quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , ] Another type of communication problem, dysarthria, encompasses a group of motor speech disorders caused by a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of speech. [ ] A second form of motor speech disorder, apraxia, occurs in the presence of significant weakness or incoordination of the muscles (...) (complexity). By varying the pitch, loudness, rate, and rhythm of voice (prosody), the speaker can convey additional meaning and emotion to words. A voice disorder exists when the quality, pitch, or volume differs from that of other persons of similar age, culture, and geographic location. Dysphonia is classified as either an organic or a functional disorder of the larynx. [ , , ] Organic dysphonia Organic disorders cause an interruption in the smooth approximation of the vocal folds. [ ] Such disorders

2014 eMedicine.com

34. Neurological History and Physical Examination (Follow-up)

Neurological History and Physical Examination (Follow-up) Neurological History and Physical Examination: Neurological History, Neurologic Examination, Examination of the Higher Functions Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache (...) , if possible.) Radiation (Pay attention to any dermatomal relationship.) Quality (stabbing, stinging, lightninglike, pounding, etc) Severity or quantity (Estimate functional limitation.) Precipitating factors (stress, periods, allergens, sleep deprivation, etc) Relieving factors (sleep, stress management, etc) Diurnal or seasonal variation Important miscellaneous factors of the history include the following: Results of previous attempts to diagnose the condition Any previous therapeutic intervention

2014 eMedicine.com

35. Somatoform Disorder: Somatization (Diagnosis)

medical outpatient visits. [ ] Physical symptoms or painful complaints of unknown etiology are fairly common in pediatric populations. [ ] Many healthy young children express emotional distress in terms of physical pain, such as stomachaches or headaches, but these complaints are usually transient and do not effect the child's overall functioning. The somatoform disorders represent the severe end of a continuum of somatic symptoms. Somatization in children consists of the persistent experience (...) of resources through repeated hospitalizations, consultations from different specialists, and ineffective investigations and treatments. [ ] Somatoform disorders are associated with poor school performance and attendance and overall impaired functioning. [ ] Appropriate and timely diagnosis combined with collaborative psychiatric and medical interventions may decrease significant long-term morbidity and suffering. Clinical The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

36. Somatoform Disorder: Somatization (Overview)

medical outpatient visits. [ ] Physical symptoms or painful complaints of unknown etiology are fairly common in pediatric populations. [ ] Many healthy young children express emotional distress in terms of physical pain, such as stomachaches or headaches, but these complaints are usually transient and do not effect the child's overall functioning. The somatoform disorders represent the severe end of a continuum of somatic symptoms. Somatization in children consists of the persistent experience (...) of resources through repeated hospitalizations, consultations from different specialists, and ineffective investigations and treatments. [ ] Somatoform disorders are associated with poor school performance and attendance and overall impaired functioning. [ ] Appropriate and timely diagnosis combined with collaborative psychiatric and medical interventions may decrease significant long-term morbidity and suffering. Clinical The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

37. Somatoform Disorder: Somatization (Follow-up)

medical outpatient visits. [ ] Physical symptoms or painful complaints of unknown etiology are fairly common in pediatric populations. [ ] Many healthy young children express emotional distress in terms of physical pain, such as stomachaches or headaches, but these complaints are usually transient and do not effect the child's overall functioning. The somatoform disorders represent the severe end of a continuum of somatic symptoms. Somatization in children consists of the persistent experience (...) of resources through repeated hospitalizations, consultations from different specialists, and ineffective investigations and treatments. [ ] Somatoform disorders are associated with poor school performance and attendance and overall impaired functioning. [ ] Appropriate and timely diagnosis combined with collaborative psychiatric and medical interventions may decrease significant long-term morbidity and suffering. Clinical The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

38. Somatoform Disorder: Somatization (Treatment)

medical outpatient visits. [ ] Physical symptoms or painful complaints of unknown etiology are fairly common in pediatric populations. [ ] Many healthy young children express emotional distress in terms of physical pain, such as stomachaches or headaches, but these complaints are usually transient and do not effect the child's overall functioning. The somatoform disorders represent the severe end of a continuum of somatic symptoms. Somatization in children consists of the persistent experience (...) of resources through repeated hospitalizations, consultations from different specialists, and ineffective investigations and treatments. [ ] Somatoform disorders are associated with poor school performance and attendance and overall impaired functioning. [ ] Appropriate and timely diagnosis combined with collaborative psychiatric and medical interventions may decrease significant long-term morbidity and suffering. Clinical The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

39. Toxicity, Chlorine Gas (Diagnosis)

Intercostal retractions Decreased breath sounds Rales (pulmonary edema) Nasal flaring Aphonia, stridor, or laryngeal edema Ulceration or hemorrhage of the respiratory tract Rhinorrhea Lacrimation, salivation, and blepharospasm Chloracne or tooth enamel corrosion (with chronic exposure) Redness, erythema, and chemical burns to the skin from dose-dependent exposure to liquid See for more detail. Diagnosis Studies in patients with significant exposure to chlorine gas may include the following: Pulse oximetry (...) Serum electrolyte, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine levels Arterial blood gases Chest radiography Electrocardiogram (ECG) CT scan of the chest Ventilation-perfusion scan Pulmonary function testing Laryngoscopy or bronchoscopy Abnormalities include hypoxia (from bronchospasm or pulmonary edema) [ ] and metabolic acidosis. The metabolic acidosis may be hyperchloremic (nonanion gap). Chest radiograph findings are frequently normal initially but later may show nonspecific abnormalities

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

40. Glottic Stenosis

. A CT scan also allows for evaluation of the laryngeal framework in order to determine the presence of a fracture or other significant injury. Spiral CT scanning with 3-dimensional reconstruction is advisable for better surgical planning and outcome. [ ] Electromyography (EMG) can help to differentiate posterior glottic stenosis from bilateral vocal cord paralysis. It may also be used to evaluate the function of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx. Under anesthesia, direct laryngoscopy (...) stenosis in the form of laryngeal webs typically manifests with symptoms of airway distress or obstruction, a weak or husky cry, and, occasionally, aphonia. Patients may present with these lesions shortly after birth and may require emergent intubation or tracheotomy if the stenosis is severe. Seventy-five percent of congenital webs are located (usually anteriorly) at the glottic level, with the remainder located in supraglottic and subglottic areas. Occasional extension to the glottic level may occur

2014 eMedicine Surgery

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>