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Functional Incontinence

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1. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women's knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial

An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women's knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial Does an educational program with instructions for performing 'the Knack' improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women's knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles?Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention (...) by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks.The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH2O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI -0.5 to 5.9); ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65); or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point

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2018 EvidenceUpdates

2. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management

Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management prolapse in women: management NICE guideline Published: 2 April 2019 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng123 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse in women: management (NG123) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

3. Urinary Incontinence-85: An Expanded Prostate Cancer Composite (EPIC) Score Cutoff Value for Urinary Incontinence Determined Using Long-term Functional Data by Repeated Prospective EPIC-Score Self-assessment After Radical Prostatectomy (PubMed)

Urinary Incontinence-85: An Expanded Prostate Cancer Composite (EPIC) Score Cutoff Value for Urinary Incontinence Determined Using Long-term Functional Data by Repeated Prospective EPIC-Score Self-assessment After Radical Prostatectomy To determine an objective cutoff value (COV) for urinary incontinence (UI) using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Composite (EPIC) score after radical prostatectomy (RP).From 2004-2013, all RP patients at our institution completed the EPIC urinary domain (EPIC-UD

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2017 International neurourology journal

4. Female Sexual Function Following Surgical Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Female Sexual Function Following Surgical Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. The impact of surgery for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) on female sexual function has received attention in the medical literature, but not in a structured manner.To assess the most recent evidence on the impact of surgical management for female SUI on female sexual function.The review and meta-analysis of available articles published in Medline, Cochrane, LILACS, SCOPUS (...) , Web of Science, CINHAL, and EMBASE included prospective randomized and non-randomized studies that assessed patients who underwent surgical treatment for UI through 2 validated questionnaires: the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI).The following terms were searched: (urinary incontinence OR female OR woman OR women) AND (suburethral slings OR transobturator tape* OR transobturator suburethral tape OR trans-obturator

2017 Sexual medicine reviews

5. Yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women. (PubMed)

Yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women. Urinary incontinence in women is associated with poor quality of life and difficulties in social, psychological and sexual functioning. The condition may affect up to 15% of middle-aged or older women in the general population. Conservative treatments such as lifestyle interventions, bladder training and pelvic floor muscle training (used either alone or in combination with other interventions) are the initial approaches to the management (...) of urinary incontinence. Many women are interested in additional treatments such as yoga, a system of philosophy, lifestyle and physical practice that originated in ancient India.To assess the effects of yoga for treating urinary incontinence in women.We searched the Cochrane Incontinence and Cochrane Complementary Medicine Specialised Registers. We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify any ongoing

2019 Cochrane

6. Interventions for treating urinary incontinence after stroke in adults. (PubMed)

of TENS reporting two comparisons found that the intervention probably improves overall functional ability (MD 8.97, 95% CI 1.27 to 16.68; 81 participants; moderate-quality evidence).Intervention versus placeboPhysical therapy: One trial of physical therapy suggests TPTNS may make little or no difference to the number of participants continent after treatment (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.19 to 3.04; 54 participants) or number of incontinent episodes (MD -1.10, 95% CI -3.99 to 1.79; 39 participants). One trial (...) Interventions for treating urinary incontinence after stroke in adults. Urinary incontinence can affect 40% to 60% of people admitted to hospital after a stroke, with 25% still having problems when discharged from hospital and 15% remaining incontinent after one year.This is an update of a review published in 2005 and updated in 2008.To assess the effects of interventions for treating urinary incontinence after stroke in adults at least one-month post-stroke.We searched the Cochrane

2019 Cochrane

7. Bowel Function, Sexual Function, and Symptoms of Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Women with and Without Urinary Incontinence (PubMed)

Bowel Function, Sexual Function, and Symptoms of Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Women with and Without Urinary Incontinence Bowel symptoms, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction are common, but their frequency among women with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has not been well described. Our aims were to describe pelvic floor symptoms among women with and without urinary incontinence (UI) and among subtypes of UI.Women with LUTS seeking care at six U.S. tertiary care centers enrolled (...) , mean PISQ-IR subscale scores were lower among those with UI (condition specific: 89.8 vs 96.7, P < 0.01; condition impact: 79.8 vs 92.5, P < 0.01). Women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) (n = 240) reported more prolapse symptoms, fecal incontinence, and worse sexual function compared to those with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI).Women presenting with LUTS with UI reported significantly worse constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, and sexual

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2018 Neurourology and urodynamics

8. Surgery for women with pelvic organ prolapse with or without stress urinary incontinence. (PubMed)

Surgery for women with pelvic organ prolapse with or without stress urinary incontinence. Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is common in women and is frequently associated with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). In many cases however, SUI is present only with the prolapse reduced (occult SUI) or may develop after surgical treatment for prolapse (de novo SUI).To determine the impact on postoperative bladder function of surgery for symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse with or without concomitant (...) or delayed two-stage continence procedures to treat or prevent stress urinary incontinence.We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE-In-Process, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO ICTRP, handsearching journals and conference proceedings (searched 11 November 2017) and reference lists of relevant articles. We also contacted researchers in the field.Randomised controlled trials

2018 Cochrane

9. Urinary incontinence in women

). May be caused by alterations in anatomical support and/or neuromuscular function of the pelvic floor, or may be idiopathic. Risk factors are multifactorial. Increased prevalence in puerperal period and in older, obese women with neurological conditions. Treatment approach depends on type of incontinence, but can include biofeedback, pharmacotherapy, neuromodulation, or surgery. Definition Urinary incontinence is a complaint of involuntary loss of urine. Bo K, Frawley HC, Haylen BT, et al (...) or tenderness nocturia abnormal bulbocavernosus and wink reflexes weakened sphincter tone chronic heart failure diabetes mellitus excess fluid intake post-void dribbling haematuria history of recurrent urinary tract infections enlarged uterus faecal impaction loss of perineal sensation increasing age white ethnicity pregnancy obesity post-menopausal status functional impairment lower urinary tract symptoms long-term residence in a care facility dementia family history of incontinence childhood enuresis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

10. Urinary incontinence in women

). May be caused by alterations in anatomical support and/or neuromuscular function of the pelvic floor, or may be idiopathic. Risk factors are multifactorial. Increased prevalence in puerperal period and in older, obese women with neurological conditions. Treatment approach depends on type of incontinence, but can include biofeedback, pharmacotherapy, neuromodulation, or surgery. Definition Urinary incontinence is a complaint of involuntary loss of urine. Bo K, Frawley HC, Haylen BT, et al (...) or tenderness nocturia abnormal bulbocavernosus and wink reflexes weakened sphincter tone chronic heart failure diabetes mellitus excess fluid intake post-void dribbling haematuria history of recurrent urinary tract infections enlarged uterus faecal impaction loss of perineal sensation increasing age white ethnicity pregnancy obesity post-menopausal status functional impairment lower urinary tract symptoms long-term residence in a care facility dementia family history of incontinence childhood enuresis

2018 BMJ Best Practice

11. Optimisation of RIZIV – INAMI lump sums for incontinence

or presence of concomitant day-time symptoms. Figure 1 – Nocturnal enuresis prevalence in children and adolescents 22 Incontinence KCE Report 304 Functional lower urinary tract dysfunction defined as any other leakage than NE, and often seen with symptoms as frequency, urgency and infections, is present in 3.2 to 9% of children; with a decreasing frequency of UI more than once a week with age: 7 years 2.6%, 11-13 years 1.1% and 15-17 0.3%. NE has been identified as an independent risk factor for day-UI (...) . Diurnal UI in children has been linked to bowel problems (constipation and functional FI), family history and socio-cultural factors, minor neurological dysfunction, developmental delay, organic anomalies such as infra-vesical obstruction in boys and sexual abuse. Urinary and faecal incontinence often coexist with approximately one-third of children with UI suffering from constipation or functional FI. 2.2.2 Urinary incontinence in women and men An estimated 30% to 60% of middle-aged and older women

2019 Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre

12. A Meta-Analysis Detailing Overall Sexual Function and Orgasmic Function in Women Undergoing Midurethral Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence. (PubMed)

A Meta-Analysis Detailing Overall Sexual Function and Orgasmic Function in Women Undergoing Midurethral Sling Surgery for Stress Incontinence. More than 200,000 midurethral slings are placed yearly for stress urinary incontinence. Approximately 14% to 20% of women experience worsening sexual function overall after these procedures. We postulated that sling placement injures neural pathways regulating "female prostate" tissue within the anterior vaginal wall.To perform a meta-analysis (...) for overall sexual function and orgasm using validated questionnaires for transvaginal tape, transobturator tape, and their variants.Effect sizes of preoperative and postoperative questionnaire scores for overall sexual function and orgasm were calculated. Random-effects models were selected for meta-analyses. Statistical analysis involved determination of the ratio of total heterogeneity to total variability.Differences of overall sexual and orgasm functions were calculated by subtracting postoperative

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2017 Sexual Medicine

13. Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence

Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence No. 186-Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 40, Issue 2, Pages e119–e125 No. 186-Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence x Magali Robert , MD Calgary, AB x Sue Ross , PhD Calgary, AB No. 186, December 2006 (Reaffirmed February 2018) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click (...) to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To outline the evidence for conservative management options for treating urinary incontinence. Options Conservative management options for treating urinary incontinence include behavioural changes, lifestyle modification, pelvic floor retraining, and use of mechanical devices. Outcomes To provide understanding of current available evidence concerning efficacy of conservative alternatives for managing urinary incontinence; to empower women

2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

14. Incontinence after Prostate Treatment: AUA/SUFU Guideline

that age, pre-operative erectile function, or nerve sparing status significantly affect the risk of sexual arousal or orgasm-related incontinence. 38 Close Guideline Statement 3 Clinicians should inform patients undergoing radical prostatectomy that incontinence is expected in the short-term and generally improves to near baseline by 12 months after surgery but may persist and require treatment. (Strong Recommendation; Evidence Level: Grade A) × Discussion A commonly accepted definition of urinary (...) progressive endarteritis decreases the functional capabilities of the external sphincter. Even in the absence of direct damage to the sphincter, adjacent surgical cautery or laser energy further compromises sphincter function. The need for subsequent resections, patient age, and pre-TURP urgency is correlated with higher rates of incontinence. 52 There is little to no published evidence discussing post-TURP outcomes with patients who have undergone other forms of local therapy such as high-intensity

2019 American Urological Association

15. Urinary Incontinence

measures in male incontinence surgery. Ann R Coll Surg Engl, 2014. 96: 521. 18. Shy, M., et al. Objective Evaluation of Overactive Bladder: Which Surveys Should I Use? Curr Bladder Dysfunct Rep, 2013. 8: 45. 19. Abrams, P., et al. The standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: report from the Standardisation Sub-committee of the International Continence Society. Neurourol Urodyn, 2002. 21: 167. 20. Haylen, B.T., et al. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA (...) : implications for function and dysfunction. Int Urogynecol J, 2011. 22: 493. 87. Morgan, D.M., et al. Urethral sphincter morphology and function with and without stress incontinence. J Urol, 2009. 182: 203. 88. Digesu, G.A., et al. Three-dimensional ultrasound of the urethral sphincter predicts continence surgery outcome. Neurourol Urodyn, 2009. 28: 90. 89. Nguyen, L., et al. Surgical technique to overcome anatomical shortcoming: balancing post-prostatectomy continence outcomes of urethral sphincter lengths

2019 European Association of Urology

16. Electrical stimulation with non-implanted devices for stress urinary incontinence in women. (PubMed)

floor muscle function to reduce involuntary urine loss.To assess the effects of electrical stimulation with non-implanted devices, alone or in combination with other treatment, for managing stress urinary incontinence or stress-predominant mixed urinary incontinence in women. Among the outcomes examined were costs and cost-effectiveness.We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (...) Electrical stimulation with non-implanted devices for stress urinary incontinence in women. Several treatment options are available for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), including pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), drug therapy and surgery. Problems exist such as adherence to PFMT regimens, side effects linked to drug therapy and the risks associated with surgery. We have evaluated an alternative treatment, electrical stimulation (ES) with non-implanted devices, which aims to improve pelvic

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2017 Cochrane

17. Coital incontinence: a factor for deteriorated health-related quality of life and sexual function in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (PubMed)

Coital incontinence: a factor for deteriorated health-related quality of life and sexual function in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence To assess the impact of coital incontinence (CI) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and quality of sexual function (QSF) in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (SUI).Women were recruited for this cross-sectional study from among 289 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, underwent clinical and urodynamic evaluation (...) . Of these 289 women, 127 sexually active women with SUI completed the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ), of whom 97 were enrolled for the study. The study group comprised 53 women with CI occurring 'sometimes', 'usually' or 'always', and the control group comprised 44 women without CI. Total and individual domain scores were evaluated.CI was reported by 65.35 % of the women. The frequency of CI was correlated with lower

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2016 International urogynecology journal

18. Non-ablative Er:YAG laser therapy effect on stress urinary incontinence related to quality of life and sexual function: A randomized controlled trial. (PubMed)

Non-ablative Er:YAG laser therapy effect on stress urinary incontinence related to quality of life and sexual function: A randomized controlled trial. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a common complaint in women after childbirth. It affects their quality of life and sexual satisfaction and is one of the major reasons for gynaecological surgery. There is a need for effective non-invasive treatment alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of non-ablative (...) treatment patients were clinically examined, answered questionnaires for SUI severity and sexual function assessment and their pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function was assessed with perineometry. Validated International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) was used as the primary outcome measure. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire short form (PISQ-12) and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) were used to assess

2018 European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology

19. Impact of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function of women with urinary incontinence and a comparison of electrical stimulation versus standard treatment (IPSU trial): a randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

Impact of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function of women with urinary incontinence and a comparison of electrical stimulation versus standard treatment (IPSU trial): a randomised controlled trial. To evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of electric stimulation plus standard pelvic floor muscle training compared to standard pelvic floor muscle training alone in women with urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction.Single centre two arm parallel group randomised controlled (...) trial conducted in a Teaching hospital in England. Participants were women presenting with urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. The interventions compared were electric stimulation versus standard pelvic floor muscle training.included Prolapse and Incontinence Sexual function Questionnaire (PISQ) physical function dimension at post-treatment (primary); other dimensions of PISQ, SF-36; EQ-5D, EPAQ, resource use, adverse events and cost-effectiveness (secondary outcomes).114 women were

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2018 Physiotherapy

20. Stem Cells for Urinary Incontinence: Functional Differentiation or Cytokine Effects? (PubMed)

Stem Cells for Urinary Incontinence: Functional Differentiation or Cytokine Effects? Minimally invasive stem cell therapy for stress urinary incontinence may provide an effective nonsurgical treatment for this common condition. Clinical trials of periurethral stem cell injection have been under way, and basic science research has demonstrated the efficacy of both local and systemic stem cell therapies. Results differ as to whether stem cells have a therapeutic effect by differentiating (...) into permanent, functional tissues or exert benefits through a transient presence and the secretion of regenerative factors. This review explores the fate of therapeutic stem cells for stress urinary incontinence and how this may relate to their mechanism of action.Published by Elsevier Inc.

2018 Urology

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