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Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale

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1. Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale

Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Framingham Cardiac Risk (...) Scale Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Aka: Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale , Framingham Coronary Heart Disease 10 Year Risk Score , Framingham Score , Framingham Risk Score , Framingham Risk Calculator , ASCVD Risk Calculator From Related Chapters II. Background New calculator released for use with ACC/AHA 2013 Guidelines and replaces the Framingham Calculator Calculator appears to primarily overestimate cardiovascular risk Calculator also allows for estimation of impact of or adding or Calculators

2018 FP Notebook

2. Comparison of self-perceived cardiovascular disease risk among smokers with Framingham and PROCAM scores: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a randomised controlled trial. (PubMed)

or cardiac arrhythmia. Participants with renal or liver failure, psychiatric disorders, substance and alcohol abuse and with smoking cessation therapies were excluded.Participants were asked to estimate their 10-year cardiovascular risk using a 3-item scale corresponding to high-risk, moderate-risk and low-risk categories. We compared their risk perception with Framingham and Prospective Cardiovascular Munster Study (PROCAM) scores. We used multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models to determine (...) Comparison of self-perceived cardiovascular disease risk among smokers with Framingham and PROCAM scores: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a randomised controlled trial. Previous studies suggest that smokers have a misperception of their 10-year cardiovascular risk. We aimed to compare 10-year cardiovascular risk self-perception and calculated risk among smokers willing to quit and assess the determinants of a possible misperception.Cross-sectional secondary analysis of baseline

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2017 BMJ open Controlled trial quality: uncertain

3. Coronary disease risk assessment in men: Comparison between ASCVD Risk versus Framingham. (PubMed)

scale, 637 men were evaluated, 12.56% were at intermediate-risk and 5.49% elevated risk, while on the ASCVD Risk scale 553 men were evaluated, and 7.05% had moderate risk and none had high coronary risk. In this study, 50.43% of men still had no previous diagnosis for any disease that increases the risk factors.The determinant clinical variables were age, blood pressure, smoking, central obesity, race and education. The Framingham scale allowed the assessment of cardiac risk of all men in the study (...) Coronary disease risk assessment in men: Comparison between ASCVD Risk versus Framingham. This study evaluated the risk of men developing coronary heart disease and its determinant variables, comparing these results through two validated coronary risk scales.A cross sectional epidemiological analytical study in which data were collected by spontaneous demand, through a semi-structured questionnaire, clinical examination, and blood collection. The Chi-square test, logistic regression and Kappa

2016 International journal of cardiology

4. Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale

Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Framingham Cardiac Risk (...) Scale Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale Aka: Framingham Cardiac Risk Scale , Framingham Coronary Heart Disease 10 Year Risk Score , Framingham Score , Framingham Risk Score , Framingham Risk Calculator , ASCVD Risk Calculator From Related Chapters II. Background New calculator released for use with ACC/AHA 2013 Guidelines and replaces the Framingham Calculator Calculator appears to primarily overestimate cardiovascular risk Calculator also allows for estimation of impact of or adding or Calculators

2015 FP Notebook

5. Assessment and Management of Patients at Risk for Suicide

Assessment and Management of Patients at Risk for Suicide VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS AT RISK FOR SUICIDE Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard (...) of recommendations for specific testing and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 2.0 – 2019VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Management of Patients at Risk for Suicide May 2019 Page 2 of 142 Prepared by: The Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk Work Group

2019 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

6. Risk factors for breast cancer: A review of the evidence 2018

and risk of breast cancer 393 Table D.53 Diet—processed meat and risk of breast cancer 395 Table D.54 Diet—red meat and risk of breast cancer 398 Table D.55 Environmental tobacco smoke and risk of breast cancer 401 Table D.56 Tobacco smoking and risk of breast cancer 405 Table D.57 Physical activity and risk of breast cancer 409 Table D.58 Shift work disrupting circadian rhythm and risk of breast cancer 415 Table D.59 Aspirin and risk of breast cancer 420 Table D.60 Cardiac glycosides and risk (...) Risk factors for breast cancer: A review of the evidence 2018 Risk factors for breast cancer: A review of the evidence 2018 Breast cancer risk factors: A review of the evidence i Risk factors for breast cancer: A review of the evidence was prepared and produced by: Cancer Australia Locked Bag 3 Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Australia Tel: +61 2 9357 9400 Fax: +61 2 9357 9477 canceraustralia.gov.au © Cancer Australia 2018. ISBN Print: 978–1–74127–336–6 ISBN Online: 978–1–74127–337–3 Recommended

2018 Cancer Australia

7. Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death

reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left vEntricular dysfunction REVERSE MIRACLE ICD Multicenter InSync ICD Randomized Clinical Evaluation RR relative risk RV right ventricular RVOT right ventricular outflow tract SA-ECG signal-averaged ECG SADS sudden arrhythmic death syndrome SCD sudden cardiac death SCD-HeFT Sudden Cardiac Death in HEart Failure Trial SCORE Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation SIDS sudden infant death syndrome SMASH-VT Substrate Mapping and Ablation in Sinus Rhythm to Halt Ventricular (...) ) of a given condition according to ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines (CPG) policy. A critical evaluation of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures was performed, including assessment of the risk–benefit ratio. Estimates of expected health outcomes for larger populations were included, where data exist. The level of evidence and the strength of the recommendation of particular management options were weighed and graded according to predefined scales, as outlined in Tables and . Table 1 Classes

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2015 European Society of Cardiology

8. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Asian population. A large multiethnic study in Canada examined CRP levels in 1250 adults of South Asian, Chinese, European, and aboriginal ancestry. CRP levels were higher in South Asians than in Chinese and Europeans, even after adjustment for metabolic factors. CRP was independently associated with ASCVD after adjustment for Framingham risk factors, atherosclerosis, anthropometric measurements, and ethnicity, adding to the evidence that South Asians may have an underlying proinflammatory state (...) Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in South Asians in the United States: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Treatments: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019

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2018 American Heart Association

9. Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

failure ? hyperlipidemia ? hypertension ? obesity ? risk factors AHA SCIENTIFIC STATEMENT Downloaded from http://ahajournals.org by on March 27, 2019Bozkurt et al December 6, 2016 Circulation. 2016;134:e535–e578. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000450 e536 Hypertension plays a Significant role in the Development of HF Elevated levels of diastolic BP and especially systolic BP (SBP) are major risk factors for the development of HF. 18,19 One of the most impactful observations from the Framingham cohort (...) and cardiac K-ATPase channels. Impairment of cardiac isch- emic preconditioning does not seem to occur with more selective and newer-generation sulfonylureas. 166 The incretin-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 [DPP-4] in- hibitors) have emerged as a new class of hyperglycemic medications. The side-effect profile of these medications when used as monotherapy (less risk of hypoglycemia and association with modest weight loss with GLP-1 ago- nists

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2016 American Heart Association

10. Implementing system wide risk stratification approaches

was considered feasible for full implementation. The Framingham Risk Score was modified for final use (two variables added -alcohol use and family history, two variables changed from binary to continuous measurement - smoking and diabetes, and one variable omitted - left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on electrocardiogram). The modified FRS was used to calculate both the absolute 10-year risk and an associated relative risk of a cardiac event for risk stratification. Assessment We are aware of the existence (...) Emergency Department EHR Electronic Health Record EMR Electronic Medical Record GP General Practitioner HCC Hierarchical Condition Category ICDMP Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program FINDRISC Finnish Diabetes Risk Score FRS Framingham Risk Score JADE Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Risk Engine JHUACG Johns Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups KPSC Kaiser Permanente Southern California LACE Length of Stay, Acuity of Admission, Comorbidities, Emergency Department Visits LVH Left Ventricular

2015 Sax Institute Evidence Check

11. Veteran Peer Coaches Optimizing and Advancing Cardiac Health

intervention consisting of home visits, telephone support, and linkages to appropriate community-based and clinic resources compared to usual VHA primary care. The primary outcome is reduction in systolic blood pressure from baseline to follow-up at 1-year. Secondary outcomes include a reduction in Framingham Cardiovascular risk score, individual cardiovascular risks (tobacco use, lipids), health related quality of life, and health care use. The investigators will also assess the effects of the peer health (...) who meet the same eligibility criteria as participants in the intervention group will be randomly assigned to receive no intervention. Participants will continue to receive their regular, usual primary care. Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Reduction in systolic blood pressure [ Time Frame: Baseline to follow-up at 1 year ] Reduction in systolic blood pressure. Secondary Outcome Measures : Reduction in Framingham Cardiovascular risk score [ Time Frame: Baseline to follow-up at 1

2016 Clinical Trials

12. Risk factors for early chronic kidney disease

progresses at a rate that requires approximately 2300 individuals each year in Australia to commence either dialysis or kidney transplantation [4]. Furthermore, the presence of CKD is one of the most potent known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such that individuals with CKD have a 2 to 3-fold greater risk of cardiac death than age- and sex-matched controls without CKD [5-7]. According to death certificate data, CKD directly or indirectly contributes to the deaths of approximately 10 (...) -1.41) in a multivariate model. Other risk factors amongst baseline characteristics were increasing age, a low GFR, diabetes and smoking. In a prospective observational cohort study involving the Framingham Offspring participants (n = 2,676; 52% women; mean age, 43 years) [22], obesity was associated with increased risk of developing stage 3 CKD (OR 1.68, 95% CI: 1.10-2.57, P = 0.02), which was no longer significant after adjustment for known cardiovascular disease risk factors. The authors

2013 KHA-CARI Guidelines

13. Vascular risk factor burden and new-onset depression in the community. (PubMed)

Vascular risk factor burden and new-onset depression in the community. Depression is associated with an increased likelihood of cardiac events and stroke. We hypothesized that the vascular risk factor burden might itself predispose to both cardiovascular events and depression. Therefore, we examined whether aggregate scores of vascular risk factor burden were associated with the new-onset of depression in the community. We studied 2023 depression- and dementia-free Framingham Heart Study (...) (Framingham, USA) Offspring participants who attended both examination cycles 7 (1998-2001) and 8 (2005-2008). The American Heart Association Ideal Cardiovascular Health metric and the Framingham stroke risk profile were calculated at exam seven. New-onset depression was adjudicated at examination cycle eight as antidepressant medication use or Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores ≥16, after a mean follow-up of 6.6years (standard deviation=0.7). Of the 2023 participants, 269 (13

2017 Preventive Medicine

14. The Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

, the purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a 12-week standardized cardiac rehabilitation exercise program on systemic inflammation and CVD risk in individuals with RA. Specifically, this study will characterize the effects of a community based CR exercise program on systemic markers of inflammation (proinflammatory cytokines) and global CVD risk (Framingham risk profile) as well as the therapeutic effects of CR exercise on the severity of RA. This study will help to clarify the mechanism(s (...) The Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients The Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2012 Clinical Trials

15. Asymptomatic Patient at Risk for Coronary Artery Disease

contrast 2 O X-ray chest 2 ? Fluoroscopy heart 2 ?? Rating Scale: 1,2,3 Usually not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation Level ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 4 Asymptomatic Patient at Risk for CAD ASYMPTOMATIC PATIENT AT RISK FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE Expert Panel on Cardiac Imaging: James P. Earls, MD 1 ; Pamela K. Woodard, MD 2 ; Suhny Abbara, MD 3 ; Scott R. Akers, MD 4 ; Philip A. Araoz, MD 5 ; Kristopher Cummings, MD 6 ; Ricardo C. Cury, MD 7 (...) ]. Risk assessment for CAD is intended to aid in determining the appropriate lifestyle changes and pharmacological interventions to reduce a patient’s risk of cardiac death. A global risk score, such as Framingham, Reynolds, Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation, or Prospective Cardiovascular Munster, is used to categorize patient risk as low, intermediate, or high. However, these risk factors are strong population-based markers but poor individual discriminators of CAD disease, and many individuals

2013 American College of Radiology

16. Inclusion of stroke in cardiovascular risk prediction instruments

instruments,moreover,isappropriatebecauseoftheimpactofstrokeonmorbidityandmortality,thesimilarityofmany approaches to prevention of stroke and these other forms of vascular disease, and the importance of stroke relative to coronary disease in some subpopulations. Non-US guidelines often include stroke patients among others at high cardiovascular risk and include stroke as a relevant outcome along with cardiac end points. Conclusions—Patients with atherosclerotic stroke should be included among those (...) to be at the same elevated risk as patients with ischemic heart disease. Patients deemed CHD riskequivalentsincludepatientswithdiabetesmellitus(DM), those whose Framingham Heart Score calculates to a risk of 20% over 10 years, and patients with “other forms of symptomatic atherosclerotic disease.” The latter group in- cludes those with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), abdom- inal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and symptomatic carotid artery disease. Ischemic stroke unrelated to carotid artery disease is Lackland et

2012 American Academy of Neurology

17. The added value of computed tomography coronary angiogram in predicting future cardiovascular events in a low risk population: comparison with Framingham Risk Score

The added value of computed tomography coronary angiogram in predicting future cardiovascular events in a low risk population: comparison with Framingham Risk Score Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g (...) points). We will test the robustness of linear regression of time-to-treatment by performing stratified analysis (treatment pre-ischemia vs during vs post-ischemia). We will assess the effect of our decision to pool all reported scales for histological damage by re-running the analyses using only data from studies using the Jablonski scale. ">Sensitivity Example: For meta-analyses using the mean difference or risk ration as effect measure and containing at least 20 studies, we will produce funnel

2015 PROSPERO

18. Cardiovascular Risk in Asymptomatic Adults: Guideline For Assessment of

), which was considered to be a CHD risk equivalent. Some versions of the FRS have focused on CHD death and nonfatal MI as endpoints, whereas a more recent version focused on more comprehensive total cardio- vascular events (27,28,36). A European “SCORE” (System- atic Coronary Risk Evaluation) was developed based on a regression model derived from observations of 200,000 adults (37). This model differs from the Framingham model in a variety of factors, including incorporation of age into a time scale (...) PATIENTS OR GUIDING THERAPY e66 2.5. Cardiac and Vascular Tests for Risk Assessment in Asymptomatic Adults e66 2.5.1. Resting Electrocardiogram e66 2.5.1.1. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTING ELECTROCARDIOGRAM e66 2.5.1.2. GENERAL DESCRIPTION e67 2.5.1.3. ASSOCIATION WITH INCREASED RISK AND INCREMENTAL RISK e67 2.5.1.4. USEFULNESS IN MOTIVATING PATIENTS, GUIDING THERAPY, AND IMPROVING OUTCOMES e68 2.5.2. Resting Echocardiography for Left Ventricular Structure and Function and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

2010 American College of Cardiology

19. Myocardial Ischemia - Nuclear Medicine and Risk Stratification

). In patients with ischemic heart disease who undergo revascularization based on PET viability assessment with F-18 FDG, those with a low myocardial perfusion reserve were at an increased risk of adverse cardiac events. [ ] Currently, nuclear myocardial scans include both perfusion and gated wall motion images. Coronary artery blood flow can be assessed, and the scans can also be used to accurately determine the left ventricular ejection fraction, the end-systolic volume of the left ventricle, regional wall (...) but also the clinical risk factors and the results of the stress test. Data from the Framingham Heart Study have enabled a more precise risk stratification according to age, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, presence of diabetes, and history. [ ] The value of exercise treadmill testing in risk stratification is optimized by using the Duke Treadmill Score. [ , ] Several online risk calculators are available. An especially good site is maintained by the . Using the clinical symptoms criteria developed

2014 eMedicine Radiology

20. Reduced Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

patients. Patients will also be excluded if they have the following: Uncontrolled metabolic factors (renal failure, uncontrolled diabetes, endocrinopathies Scheduled revascularization Unable to provide informed consent Unlikely to survive due to non cardiac issues Psychiatric conditions that would interfere with compliance. Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale higher than 16 points. Those coming to the cardiac rehabilitation program due to congenital heart disease with no risk factors (...) : Standard cardiac rehabilitation programs (sCRP) aim to improve risk factors for heart disease such as high blood pressure, weight control, exercise and diet in order to decrease the chances of having heart problems in the future. These programs decrease morbidity and mortality but face important challenges: 1) Long waiting lists to participate in these programs. For example, St. Paul's Hospital has an intake capacity of 480 patients per year. Patients usually wait one to three months to start

2011 Clinical Trials

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