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Football Helmet

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1. A football helmet prototype that reduces linear and rotational acceleration with the addition of an outer shell. (PubMed)

A football helmet prototype that reduces linear and rotational acceleration with the addition of an outer shell. OBJECTIVEAmid the public health controversy surrounding American football, a helmet that can reduce linear and rotational acceleration has the potential to decrease forces transmitted to the brain. The authors hypothesized that a football helmet with an outer shell would reduce both linear and rotational acceleration. The authors' objectives were to 1) determine an optimal material (...) for a shock-absorbing outer shell and 2) examine the ability of an outer shell to reduce linear and/or rotational acceleration.METHODSA laboratory-based investigation was undertaken using an extra-large Riddell Revolution football helmet. Two materials (Dow Corning Dilatant Compound and Sorbothane) were selected for their non-Newtonian properties (changes in viscosity with shear stress) to develop an outer shell. External pads were attached securely to the helmet at 3 locations: the front boss, the side

2018 Journal of Neurosurgery

2. High School Football Players Use Their Helmets to Tackle Other Players Despite Knowing the Risks (PubMed)

High School Football Players Use Their Helmets to Tackle Other Players Despite Knowing the Risks There is greater attention to head-related injuries and concussions in American football. The helmet's structural safety and the way that football players use their helmets are important in preventing head injuries. Current strategies include penalizing players for high-risk behavior such as leading with their helmet or hitting an opposing player above the shoulder. Passive strategies include helmet (...) modification to better protect the head of the players or to change the playing style of the players. Hawai'i high school varsity football players were surveyed to determine how they use their helmets and how a new helmet design would affect their style of play. One hundred seventy-seven surveys were completed; 79% said that they used their helmet to hit an opposing player during a tackle and 46% said they made this contact intentionally. When asked about modifying helmets with a soft material

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2017 Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health

3. Comparison of Impact Performance between Youth and Varsity Football Helmets (PubMed)

Comparison of Impact Performance between Youth and Varsity Football Helmets Current youth football helmets, intended for players under the age of 14 years old, are similar in design and are tested under the same standard as varsity football helmets. This study evaluated the impact performance of matched youth and adult varsity football helmets. Eight helmet models were evaluated using an impact pendulum, with a modified National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE (...) ) medium sized headform mounted on a Hybrid III 50th percentile neck. Four locations on the helmet shell at three impact velocities were tested for three trials, for a total of 576 impact tests. Linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and a concussion correlate were recorded for each test and a comparison between the youth and varsity helmets were made. It was found that the age group the helmet is intended for did not have a significant effect on the impact performance of the helmet in either

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2017 Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Part P, Journal of sports engineering and technology

4. The Influence of Friction Between Football Helmet and Jersey Materials on Force: A Consideration for Sport Safety (PubMed)

The Influence of Friction Between Football Helmet and Jersey Materials on Force: A Consideration for Sport Safety The pocketing effect of helmet padding helps to dissipate forces experienced by the head, but if the player's helmet remains stationary in an opponent's shoulder pads, the compressive force on the cervical spine may increase.To (1) measure the coefficient of static friction between different football helmet finishes and football jersey fabrics and (2) calculate the potential amount (...) of force on a player's helmet due to the amount of friction present.Cross-sectional study.Laboratory.Helmets with different finishes and different football jersey fabrics.The coefficient of friction was determined for 2 helmet samples (glossy and matte), 3 football jerseys (collegiate, high school, and youth), and 3 types of jersey numbers (silkscreened, sublimated, and stitched on) using the TAPPI T 815 standard method. These measurements determined which helmet-to-helmet, helmet-to-jersey number

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2016 Journal of athletic training

5. Inadequate Helmet Fit Increases Concussion Severity in American High School Football Players (PubMed)

Inadequate Helmet Fit Increases Concussion Severity in American High School Football Players There is limited information on the relationship between football helmet fit and concussion severity.Poor helmet fit may predispose football players to a more severe concussion.Descriptive epidemiology study.Level 3.Data from concussion injury reports were obtained from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System over a 9-year period. Symptoms, duration, and helmet parameters (fit (...) had greater rates of sensitivity to light (RR, 1.13; P = 0.02), sensitivity to noise (RR, 1.25; P = 0.009), and longer symptom duration (P = 0.004) compared with foam or gel liners.An improperly fitted football helmet is a risk factor for a concussion with more symptoms and of longer duration. Concussions of longer duration are also more common in players with an air bladder-lined helmet. Current high school football rules should mandate supervision and maintenance of helmet fit throughout

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2016 Sports health

6. The Ability of American Football Helmets to Manage Linear Acceleration With Repeated High-Energy Impacts (PubMed)

The Ability of American Football Helmets to Manage Linear Acceleration With Repeated High-Energy Impacts Football players can receive up to 1400 head impacts per season, averaging 6.3 impacts per practice and 14.3 impacts per game. A decrease in the capacity of a helmet to manage linear acceleration with multiple impacts could increase the risk of traumatic brain injury.To investigate the ability of football helmets to manage linear acceleration with multiple high-energy impacts.Descriptive (...) laboratory study.Laboratory.We collected linear-acceleration data for 100 impacts at 6 locations on 4 helmets of different models currently used in football. Impacts 11 to 20 were compared with impacts 91 to 100 for each of the 6 locations.Linear acceleration was greater after multiple impacts (91-100) than after the first few impacts (11-20) for the front, front-boss, rear, and top locations. However, these differences are not clinically relevant as they do not affect the risk for head injury.American

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2016 Journal of athletic training

7. Football Helmet

Football Helmet Football Helmet Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Football Helmet Football Helmet Aka: Football Helmet (...) From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Football Helmet prevents Head and Neck fatalities Head, neck injury responsible for 85% football deaths Interventions reducing Head and Neck Injuries Ban on spearing (1976) Helmet used as first point of contact Education for athletes, coaches and trainers C-Spine and airway control ing Controlled helmet removal with 2 people Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Football Helmet

2018 FP Notebook

8. Wearing American Football helmets increases cervicocephalic kinaesthetic awareness in “elite” American Football players but not controls (PubMed)

Wearing American Football helmets increases cervicocephalic kinaesthetic awareness in “elite” American Football players but not controls While there have been investigations into the reduced neck injury rate of wearing protective helmets, there is little information on its effects on normal kinaesthetic neck function. This study aims to quantify the kinaesthetic and movement effects of the American football helmet.Fifteen British Collegiate American football players (mean age 22.2, SD 1.9 (...) ; BMI kg.m(2) 26.3, SD 3.7) were age and size matched to 11 non-American football playing university students (mean age 22.5, SD 3.6; BMI 24.3, SD 3.3 kg.m(2)). Both groups had their active cervical range of motion and head repositioning accuracy measured during neck flexion/extension using a modified cervical range of motion device and a similarly modified football helmet.Wearing helmets significantly reduced active cervical range of motion in extension in both groups (P = 0.007 and P = 0.001

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2015 Chiropractic & manual therapies

9. The Influence of Heavier Football Helmet Faceguards on Head Impact Location and Severity. (PubMed)

The Influence of Heavier Football Helmet Faceguards on Head Impact Location and Severity. To determine whether players with heavier faceguards have increased odds of sustaining top of the head impacts and head impacts of higher severity.Cohort study.On-field.Thirty-five division I collegiate football players.Faceguard mass was measured. Head impact location and severity (linear acceleration [gravity], rotational acceleration [radian per square second], and Head Impact Technology severity (...) = 0.05). Player position was included in all models.Overall, the 4 head impact locations were equally distributed across faceguard groups (F(3,26) = 2.16, P = 0.117). Football players with heavier faceguards sustained a higher proportion impacts to the top of the head (24.7% vs 17.5%) and had slightly increased odds of sustaining top (OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.01-2.94) head impacts rather than front of the head impacts.Football players wearing heavier faceguards might be slightly more prone to sustaining

2017 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

10. Concussion Characteristics in High School Football by Helmet Age/Recondition Status, Manufacturer, and Model: 2008-2009 Through 2012-2013 Academic Years in the United States. (PubMed)

Concussion Characteristics in High School Football by Helmet Age/Recondition Status, Manufacturer, and Model: 2008-2009 Through 2012-2013 Academic Years in the United States. Football helmets used by high school athletes in the United States should meet the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment performance standards. Despite differences in interior padding and exterior shells, all football helmets should provide comparable protection against concussions. Yet, debate (...) continues on whether differences in the rates or severity of concussions exist based on helmet age/recondition status, manufacturer, or model.To investigate whether high school football concussion characteristics varied by helmet age/recondition status, manufacturer, and model.Descriptive epidemiological study.High school football concussion and helmet data were collected from academic years 2008-2009 through 2012-2013 as part of the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study

2016 American Journal of Sports Medicine

11. Wearing a Weapon: The Football Helmet's Dangerous Evolution

Wearing a Weapon: The Football Helmet's Dangerous Evolution CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog: Wearing a Weapon: The Football Helmet's Dangerous Evolution Health News Updated Daily by Internist and Allergist at Cleveland Clinic Florida Pages Wearing a Weapon: The Football Helmet's Dangerous Evolution The history of how helmets arrived on the football field, from TIME: Posted by Allergy on Labels: , No comments: Post a Comment Subscribe to: Total Pageviews About Us All opinions expressed here

2015 CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

12. External Foam Layers to Football Helmets Reduce Head Impact Severity (PubMed)

External Foam Layers to Football Helmets Reduce Head Impact Severity Current American football helmet design has a rigid exterior with a padded interior. Softening the hard external layer of the helmet may reduce the impact potential of the helmet, providing extra head protection and reducing its use as an offensive device. The objective of this study is to measure the impact reduction potential provided by external foam. We obtained a football helmet with built-in accelerometer-based sensors (...) to the football field. Redesigning football helmets could reduce the injury potential of the sport.

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2014 Hawai'i Journal of Medicine & Public Health

13. Can helmet design reduce the risk of concussion in football? (PubMed)

Can helmet design reduce the risk of concussion in football? Of all sports, football accounts for the highest incidence of concussion in the US due to the large number of athletes participating and the nature of the sport. While there is general agreement that concussion incidence can be reduced through rule changes and teaching proper tackling technique, there remains debate as to whether helmet design may also reduce the incidence of concussion. A retrospective analysis was performed of head (...) impact data collected from 1833 collegiate football players who were instrumented with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays for games and practices. Data were collected between 2005 and 2010 from 8 collegiate football teams: Virginia Tech, University of North Carolina, University of Oklahoma, Dartmouth College, Brown University, University of Minnesota, Indiana University, and University of Illinois. Concussion rates were compared between players wearing Riddell VSR4 and Riddell Revolution helmets

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2014 Journal of Neurosurgery

14. The Ability of an Aftermarket Helmet Add-On Device to Reduce Impact-Force Accelerations During Drop Tests (PubMed)

The Ability of an Aftermarket Helmet Add-On Device to Reduce Impact-Force Accelerations During Drop Tests   The Guardian Cap provides a soft covering intended to mitigate energy transfer to the head during football contact. Yet how well it attenuates impacts remains unknown.  To evaluate the changes in the Gadd Severity Index (GSI) and linear acceleration during drop tests on helmeted headforms with or without Guardian Caps.  Crossover study.  Laboratory.  Nine new football helmets sent (...) directly from the manufacturer.  We dropped the helmets at 3 velocities on 6 helmet locations (front, side, right front boss, top, rear right boss, and rear) as prescribed by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. Helmets were tested with facemasks in place but no Guardian Cap and then retested with the facemasks in place and the Guardian Cap affixed.  The GSI scores and linear accelerations measured in g forces.  For the GSI, we found a significant interaction among drop

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2017 Journal of athletic training

15. Elevated markers of brain injury as a result of clinically asymptomatic high-acceleration head impacts in high-school football athletes. (PubMed)

profile of these biomarkers over the course of the football season.METHODSSixteen varsity high-school football athletes underwent baseline neurocognitive testing and blood sampling for the biomarkers tau, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1), neurofilament light protein (NF-L), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs). All athletes wore helmet-based accelerometers to measure and record head impact data during all practices and games. At various time points (...) Elevated markers of brain injury as a result of clinically asymptomatic high-acceleration head impacts in high-school football athletes. OBJECTIVEThis prospective observational cohort study of high-school football athletes was performed to determine if high-acceleration head impacts (HHIs) that do not result in clinically diagnosed concussion still lead to increases in serum levels of biomarkers indicating traumatic brain injury (TBI) in asymptomatic athletes and to determine the longitudinal

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2018 Journal of Neurosurgery

16. Face mask removal is safer than helmet removal for emergent airway access in American football. (PubMed)

Face mask removal is safer than helmet removal for emergent airway access in American football. In cases of possible cervical spine injury, medical professionals must be prepared to achieve rapid airway access while concurrently restricting cervical spine motion. Face mask removal (FMR), rather than helmet removal (HR), is recommended to achieve this. However, no studies have been reported that compare FMR directly with HR.The purpose of this study was to compare motion, time, and perceived (...) difficulty in two commonly used American football helmets between FMR and HR techniques, and when helmet air bladders were deflated before HR compared with inflated scenarios.The study incorporated a repeated measures design and was performed in a controlled laboratory setting.Participants included 22 certified athletic trainers (15 men and seven women; mean age, 33.9±10.5 years; mean experience, 11.4±10.0 years; mean height, 172±9.4 cm; mean mass, 76.7±14.9 kg). All participants were free from upper

2013 The Spine Journal

17. Biomechanical performance of leather and modern football helmets. (PubMed)

Biomechanical performance of leather and modern football helmets. With the increased national concern about concussions in football, recent research has focused on evaluating the impact performance of modern football helmets. Specifically, this technical note offers a biomechanical analysis of classic leather helmets compared with modern helmets. Furthermore, modern helmets were examined to illustrate the performance differences between the better- and worse-performing ones. A total of 1224 (...) drop tests were performed from a range of drop heights and impact locations on 11 different helmet types (10 modern and 1 leather helmet model). The resulting head acceleration was used to assess the risk of concussion for each drop test. The results of this analysis demonstrate that modern helmets are significantly and substantially superior to leather helmets in all impact scenarios, and that notable differences exist among modern helmets.

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2013 Journal of Neurosurgery

18. Safety regulation in professional football: Empirical evidence of intended and unintended consequences. (PubMed)

Safety regulation in professional football: Empirical evidence of intended and unintended consequences. In response to increasing public awareness and negative long-term health effects of concussions, the National Football League implemented the "Crown-of-the-Helmet Rule" (CHR). The CHR imposes penalties on players who initiate contact using the top of the helmet. This paper examines the intended effect of this policy and its potential for unintended consequences. We find evidence supporting

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2017 Journal of health economics

19. White Matter Changes Related to Subconcussive Impact Frequency During a Single Season of High School Football (PubMed)

White Matter Changes Related to Subconcussive Impact Frequency During a Single Season of High School Football The effect of exposing the developing brain of a high school football player to subconcussive impacts during a single season is unknown. The purpose of this pilot study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to assess white matter changes during a single high school football season, and to correlate these changes with impacts measured by helmet accelerometer data and neurocognitive test (...) for multiple comparisons. ROI analysis showed significant (P < .05, corrected) decreases in fractional anisotropy in the fornix-stria terminalis and cingulum hippocampus, which were related to impact frequency. The effects were strongest in the fornix-stria terminalis, where decreases in fractional anisotropy correlated with worsening visual memory.Our findings suggest that subclinical neurotrauma related to participation in American football may result in white matter injury and that alterations in white

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2017 AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology

20. Head impact exposure measured in a single youth football team during practice drills (PubMed)

Head impact exposure measured in a single youth football team during practice drills OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts in practice drills within a youth football team to determine how head impact exposure varies among different types of drills. METHODS On-field head impact data were collected from athletes participating in a youth football team for a single season. Each athlete wore a helmet instrumented with a Head Impact Telemetry (HIT (...) impact frequency, with an average of 0.59 impacts per minute per athlete, but the lowest 95th percentile linear accelerations of all drills. The front of the head was the most common impact location for all drills except dummy/sled tackling. CONCLUSIONS Head impact exposure varies significantly in youth football practice drills, with several drills exposing athletes to high-magnitude and/or high-frequency head impacts. These data suggest that further study of practice drills is an important step

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2017 Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics

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