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Foot Progression Angle

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1. Effects of foot progression angle adjustment on medial knee loading during walking in individuals with and without knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Effects of foot progression angle adjustment on medial knee loading during walking in individuals with and without knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

2. Validation of wearable visual feedback for retraining foot progression angle using inertial sensors and an augmented reality headset (PubMed)

Validation of wearable visual feedback for retraining foot progression angle using inertial sensors and an augmented reality headset Gait retraining interventions using real-time biofeedback have been proposed to alter the loading across the knee joint in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Despite the demonstrated benefits of these conservative treatments, their clinical adoption is currently obstructed by the high complexity, spatial demands, and cost of optical motion capture systems (...) . In this study we propose and evaluate a wearable visual feedback system for gait retraining of the foot progression angle (FPA).The primary components of the system are inertial measurement units, which track the human movement without spatial limitations, and an augmented reality headset used to project the visual feedback in the visual field. The adapted gait protocol contained five different target angles ranging from 15 degrees toe-out to 5 degrees toe-in. Eleven healthy participants walked

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2018 Journal of neuroengineering and rehabilitation

3. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test: A Dynamic Diagnostic Assessment for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Instability (PubMed)

Foot Progression Angle Walking Test: A Dynamic Diagnostic Assessment for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Instability Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity (...) -related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain.To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability.Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain

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2017 Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine

4. Static and Dynamic Predictors of Foot Progression Angle in Individuals with and without Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Neuropathy (PubMed)

Static and Dynamic Predictors of Foot Progression Angle in Individuals with and without Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Neuropathy Foot progression angle (FPA) is a predictor of elevated regional plantar stresses and loads, which are indicators of dermal injury risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (DMPN). FPA accounts for 15-45% of the variance in plantar stresses and loads in adults with DMPN. However, the biomechanical factors underlying an "out-toeing" gait (...) pattern in this clinical population have not been examined. The primary purpose of this study was to identify static and dynamic predictors of foot progression angle magnitude in adults with and without DMPN.Thirty-three adults with and 12 adults without diabetes mellitus participated. Hip rotation, ankle dorsiflexion, and resting calcaneal stance position were measured using a standard goniometer. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during walking.Static predictor variables did

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2016 Annals of gerontology and geriatric research

5. Impact of foot progression angle modification on plantar loading in individuals with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (PubMed)

Impact of foot progression angle modification on plantar loading in individuals with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy To determine if participants can reduce foot progression angle (FPA), and if FPA reduction decreases regional plantar stresses and forces in individuals with diabetes.Design: Three-group cross-sectional design with repeated measures. subjects: twenty-eight participants either with diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetes and peripheral neuropathy with (DMPN+NPU) or without (...) a prior history of ulceration (DMPN-NPU) were studied. Intervention: Participants were first instructed to walk over a 3.6 m walkway at their preferred FPA, and then to walk with their foot aligned parallel with the line of gait progression at their self-selected speed. Dynamic plantar kinetics in six masked regions were collected using an EMED-st-P-2 pedobarograph. Main measures: Primary outcome measures were FPA, peak plantar pressure (PPP), and force-time integral (FTI). A repeated measures ANOVA

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2016 Edorium journal of disability and rehabilitation

6. Foot Progression Angle

Foot Progression Angle Foot Progression Angle Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Foot Progression Angle Foot Progression (...) Angle Aka: Foot Progression Angle , Gait Rotational Angle II. Indication Pediatric evaluation III. Technique Observe child walk Evaluate foot long axis relative to line of walking Imagine line from heel to second to third toe Estimate angle of foot deviating from this line IV. Interpretation: Normal rotational angles (varies by age) Age 1: -4 to 19 degrees (mean 7 degrees) Age 3: -4 to 17 degrees (mean 6 degrees) Age 5: -4 to 15 degrees (mean 5 degrees) Age 7: -4 to 15 degrees (mean 5 degrees) Age 9

2018 FP Notebook

7. PREDICTING FOOT PROGRESSION ANGLE DURING GAIT USING TWO CLINICAL MEASURES IN HEALTHY ADULTS, A PRELIMINARY STUDY (PubMed)

PREDICTING FOOT PROGRESSION ANGLE DURING GAIT USING TWO CLINICAL MEASURES IN HEALTHY ADULTS, A PRELIMINARY STUDY The foot progression angle (FPA) is related to the transverse plane rotation of the lower extremities and associated with many lower extremity conditions.The purpose of this study was to examine how two commonly used clinical measures, tibio-fibular torsion (TF) and hip rotation, can be used to predict FPA during gait in healthy adults.Cross-sectional study design.Passive hip (...) IR had a moderate negative correlation (r = -.40) with FPA (the greater the hip IR, the greater the in-toeing) while TF torsion had a positive correlation (r = .39) with FPA (the greater the external TF torsion. the greater the out-toeing).Greater amount of passive hip IR predicts in-toeing while greater TF torsion predicts out-toeing of the foot during midstance phase of gait.Level 2.

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2016 International journal of sports physical therapy

8. Altering foot progression angle in people with medial knee osteoarthritis: the effects of varying toe-in and toe-out angles are mediated by pain and malalignment. (PubMed)

Altering foot progression angle in people with medial knee osteoarthritis: the effects of varying toe-in and toe-out angles are mediated by pain and malalignment. To evaluate if altering the foot progression angle (FPA) by varying magnitudes during gait alters the external knee adduction moment (KAM), knee flexion moment (KFM), knee extension moment (KEM) and/or symptoms in people with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Potential influence of pain and knee malalignment on load-modifying effects

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2013 Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

9. Ankle and Foot Surgical Guideline

-relatedness is the presence of osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis is a normal degenerative process and a progressive condition that results from loss or deterioration of articular cartilage. It is the most common arthritic disease, it is the most common cause of long-term disability in persons older than 65, and it is expected to become the world’s 4 th leading cause of disability by 2020. 32 While osteoarthritis is an important consideration for treatment of foot and ankle conditions, the ankle joint (...) as possible any pre- or post-injury presence or progression, objectively or subjectively, of an osteoarthritic condition; 2. An evidence-based explanation supporting the contention that the osteoarthritis would not presently require treatment had the industrial injury or occupational disease not have occurred. V. Assessment With 33 joints, 26 bones, and over 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments, the foot and ankle are a complex structure. Clinical assessment should include: ? Observing the foot and ankle

2017 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

10. Custom Foot Orthotics for Adults with Foot Conditions: A Review of the Clinical and Cost Effectiveness

. In the review by Hume et al., 2 outcomes of interest were loosely described as comprising patient pain and comfort, and prevention of injury. Hennessy et al. 13 did not pre-specify any particular outcomes of interest, but did define six upon identification of the included studies: pain, foot function, walking speed, forefoot plantar pressure, gait parameters, and hallux abductovalgus (HAV) angle progression. Primary outcomes of interest in the RCT by Burns et al. 14 were foot pain and function while (...) parameters -hallux abductovalgus angle progression HRQOL = Health-related quality of life Custom Foot Orthotics for Adults with Foot Conditions 14 Appendix 3: Summary of Critical Appraisal First Author, Publication Year, Country Strengths Limitations Foot pain Hawke, 2008, 1 Australia Systematic review Well described, a priori design with comparators pre- specified Duplicate study selection; independent verification of extracted data by two separate authors Comprehensive literature search performed

2012 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

11. Foot Progression Angle

Foot Progression Angle Foot Progression Angle Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Foot Progression Angle Foot Progression (...) Angle Aka: Foot Progression Angle , Gait Rotational Angle II. Indication Pediatric evaluation III. Technique Observe child walk Evaluate foot long axis relative to line of walking Imagine line from heel to second to third toe Estimate angle of foot deviating from this line IV. Interpretation: Normal rotational angles (varies by age) Age 1: -4 to 19 degrees (mean 7 degrees) Age 3: -4 to 17 degrees (mean 6 degrees) Age 5: -4 to 15 degrees (mean 5 degrees) Age 7: -4 to 15 degrees (mean 5 degrees) Age 9

2015 FP Notebook

12. The direct lateral approach: impact on gait patterns, foot progression angle and pain in comparison with a minimally invasive anterolateral approach. (PubMed)

The direct lateral approach: impact on gait patterns, foot progression angle and pain in comparison with a minimally invasive anterolateral approach. Minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty has been successfully introduced in the past decade. Nevertheless, standard approaches such as the direct lateral approach are still commonly used in orthopaedic surgery due to easy handling, good intra-operative overview and low complication rates. However, a frequent occurrence of fatty atrophy within (...) the anterior third of the gluteus medius muscle has been demonstrated when using the modified direct-lateral approach (mDL), which may be associated with a reduction in function, limitation of internal leg rotation, gait disorders and pain. The question addressed in this study is whether mDL-approach leads to unfavourable changes in foot progression angle (FPA), gait and to more postoperative pain compared with a minimally invasive anterolateral approach (ALMI).Thirty patients with primary osteoarthritis

2012 Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery

13. Biomechanical investigation of two plating systems for medial column fusion in foot. (PubMed)

of this study was to investigate biomechanically plantar and dorsomedial fusion of the medial column using two new plating systems.Eight matched pairs of human cadaveric lower legs were randomized in two groups and medial column fusion was performed using either plantar or dorsomedial variable-angle locking compression plates. The specimens were biomechanically tested under cyclic progressively increasing axial loading with physiological profile of each cycle. In addition to the machine data, mediolateral x (...) Biomechanical investigation of two plating systems for medial column fusion in foot. Arthrodesis of the medial column (navicular, cuneiform I and metatarsal I) is performed for reasons such as Charcot arthropathy, arthritis, posttraumatic reconstruction or severe pes planus. However, the complication rate is still high and mainly resulting from inadequate fixation. Special plates, designed for medial column arthrodesis, seem to offer potential to reduce the complication rate. The aim

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2017 PLoS ONE

14. Tuned Versus Untuned Ankle-foot Orthoses in Children and Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy

the normal gait cycle in degrees. The MAP consists of individual scores for each joint rotation angle (pelvic tilt, pelvic obliquity, pelvic rotation, hip flexion/extension, hip abduction/adduction, hip rotation, knee flexion/extension, ankle dorsiflexion/extension and foot progression) of the affected leg spatio-temporal parameter [ Time Frame: at end of study, an average of 1 month ] calculated from kinematic parameters and expressed as the deviation from the normal gait cycle in degrees,Spatio (...) Tuned Versus Untuned Ankle-foot Orthoses in Children and Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy Tuned Versus Untuned Ankle-foot Orthoses in Children and Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies

2018 Clinical Trials

15. Foot Orthotic for Early Stage Rheumatoid Arthritis

Arthritis of Foot (Disorder) Device: Foot orthotics Device: Standard insole Not Applicable Detailed Description: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune, chronic, progressive, systemic inflammatory disease leading to substantial pain, disability, and other morbidities. In Denmark there are 40.000 patients with RA. In RA, synovitis, effusion, eventually erosive arthritis, bone loss and weakening of the muscle and tendon apparatus are thought to cause clinically recognizable valgus heel or pes (...) Foot Orthotic for Early Stage Rheumatoid Arthritis Foot Orthotic for Early Stage Rheumatoid Arthritis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Foot Orthotic for Early Stage Rheumatoid Arthritis

2018 Clinical Trials

16. The effect of walking speed on the foot inter-segment kinematics, ground reaction forces and lower limb joint moments (PubMed)

for increased HX/FF DF. Although small angle variation in HF/TB EV and FF/HF SP during FW may have profound effects for foot kinetics. Higher HF/TB ER contributed to the FF push-off the ground while the center of mass (COM) progresses forward in FW, therefore accompanied by higher FF/HF abduction in FW. Increased peak vertical GRF in FW may affected by decreased stance duration time, the biomechanical mechanism maybe the change in vertical COM height and increase leg stiffness. Walking speed changes (...) The effect of walking speed on the foot inter-segment kinematics, ground reaction forces and lower limb joint moments Normative foot kinematic and kinetic data with different walking speeds will benefit rehabilitation programs and improving gait performance. The purpose of this study was to analyze foot kinematics and kinetics differences between slow walking (SW), normal walking (NW) and fast walking (FW) of healthy subjects.A total of 10 healthy male subjects participated in this study

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2018 PeerJ

17. Relationship between foot posture and dental malocclusions in children aged 6 to 9 years: A cross-sectional study. (PubMed)

of the University of Málaga (CEUMA 26/2015H).This observational, descriptive, cross-sectional analysis is based on a study population (STROBE). Qualified personnel conducted a podiatric and dental examination of each child, recording the Clarke angle and the foot posture index (FPI) as an outcomes measure in the feet, and also dental malocclusions, according to Angle classification.A significant correlation was observed for the FPI scores (for right foot) as well as the Clarke angle (for right foot (...) ), in relation to dental malocclusions as determined by Angle classification (P < .001). Of all the supinated feet analyzed, 38.46% were Class II according to Angle classification, and none were Class III. Of the pronated feet, 48.57% were Class III, 42.85% were Class I, and 8.57% were Class II.The Clarke angle decreases with the progression from Class I to III, whereas the FPI increases with that from Class I to III. These findings suggest there is a relation between the Clarke angle and FPI, on the one

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2018 Medicine

18. Functional Outcomes Following Anterior Transfer of the Tibialis Posterior Tendon for Foot Drop Secondary to Peroneal Nerve Palsy. (PubMed)

to evaluate the level of functional restoration. Functional evaluations included American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) scores, and isokinetic muscle strength test. Radiographic evaluation for the changes of postoperative foot alignment included Meary angle, calcaneal pitch angle, hindfoot alignment angle, and navicular height.Mean AOFAS, FAOS, and FAAM scores significantly improved from 65.1 to 86.2, 55.6 (...) , tibialis posterior tendon transfer demonstrated no definitive radiographic or clinical progression to postoperative flat foot deformity at intermediate-term follow-up.Level IV, retrospective case series.

2017 Foot & Ankle International

19. Assessment and Management of Foot Ulcers for People with Diabetes, Second Edition

.3 Provide health education to optimize diabetes management, foot care and ulcer care . Ia ? 3 .4 Facilitate client-centred learning based on individual needs to prevent or reduce complications . III ? Evaluation 4 .0 Monitor the progress of wound healing on an ongoing basis using a consistent tool, and evaluate the percentage of wound closure at 4 weeks . Ib ? 4 .1 Reassess for additional correctable factors if healing does not occur at the expected rate . IV ?10 REGISTERED NURSES’ ASSOCIATION (...) exercise. Other factors contributing to delayed onset of complications include control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. Unfortunately, these treatments may not completely control the progression of diabetes-related changes, such as neuropathy (Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) Expert Committee, 2008). Diabetic foot ulceration and amputation are a result of complications of diabetes such as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and neuropathy (see

2013 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

20. Strength and muscle activities during the toe-gripping action: comparison of ankle angle in the horizontal plane between the sitting upright and standing positions (PubMed)

activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, anterior tibialis, and medial head of the gastrocnemius. In addition, we calculated the percent integrated electromyography during foot gripping in 3 different ankle joint positions between the long axis of the foot and the line of progression on the horizontal plane, namely 10° of internal rotation, 0°, and 10° of external rotation. [Results] Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences. A significant main effect was observed (...) Strength and muscle activities during the toe-gripping action: comparison of ankle angle in the horizontal plane between the sitting upright and standing positions [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether toe grip strength and muscle activities are affected by the ankle angle in the horizontal plane in the sitting upright and standing positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and the maximum voluntary contraction

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2016 Journal of physical therapy science

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